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You searched for +publisher:"University of Florida" +contributor:("Wetzel, Paul"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Lindgren, Kristianna. Interspecific Plant Competition Between Eleocharis Montevidensis and Scirpus Validus Along a Salinity Gradient in the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge.

Degree: MS, Interdisciplinary Ecology, 2010, University of Florida

Previous work within the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) has suggested that interspecific competition is an important factor in the species assemblages in the tidal marsh systems. However, this work was completed under different environmental conditions than were currently being experienced. Experiments to quantify competitive interactions within the marsh will lend insight to creating marsh succession models applicable to present conditions. The competitive interactions of soft-stem bulrush (Scirpus validus) and sand spikerush (Eleocharis montevidensis) were studied under two different salinity levels in the field with a transplant experiment using non-destructive sampling methods. One salinity level was representative of freshwater conditions (under 0.5 ppt), while the other represented oligohaline conditions (between 0.5 and 5.0 ppt). Both species are prevalent within the refuge, but S. validus is the only species that is consistently present throughout the tidal salinity gradient from freshwater to mesohaline marshes and this gradient alone only partially explains the distributions. For this reason, I initiated a competition study to better explain the distribution of this generalist species, particularly in the upper reaches of the estuary dominated by both freshwater and oligohaline conditions. At the initiation of the experiment, it was expected that S. validus would outcompete E. montevidensis in the oligohaline conditions because it is a generalist with a greater salinity tolerance. At the conclusion of the experiment, it was clear that belowground competition between the two species was occurring at both freshwater and oligohaline sites. E. montevidensis was able to invade S. validus plots more effectively and quickly than S. validus invaded E. montevidensis plots, regardless of salinity level. At the same time E. montevidensis was increasing in plots of S. validus, stems of S. validus were decreasing. S. validus was slower to invade E. montevidensis plots, and was found in lower density at the tidal freshwater site. The results suggest that E. montevidensis is able to tolerate oligohaline salinity conditions while remaining competitive at both salinities. It also suggests that under fresher conditions E. montevidensis may be capable of preventing invasion of S. validus for a longer period of time. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Kitchens, Wiley M. (committee chair), Clark, Mark W. (committee member), Wetzel, Paul (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Ecology; Fresh water; Interspecific competition; Marshes; Plant competition; Salinity; Salt marshes; Savannas; Species; Vegetation; competition, eleocharis, interspecific, marsh, salinity, scirpus, wetland

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lindgren, K. (2010). Interspecific Plant Competition Between Eleocharis Montevidensis and Scirpus Validus Along a Salinity Gradient in the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042593

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lindgren, Kristianna. “Interspecific Plant Competition Between Eleocharis Montevidensis and Scirpus Validus Along a Salinity Gradient in the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed April 02, 2020. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042593.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lindgren, Kristianna. “Interspecific Plant Competition Between Eleocharis Montevidensis and Scirpus Validus Along a Salinity Gradient in the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge.” 2010. Web. 02 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Lindgren K. Interspecific Plant Competition Between Eleocharis Montevidensis and Scirpus Validus Along a Salinity Gradient in the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2020 Apr 02]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042593.

Council of Science Editors:

Lindgren K. Interspecific Plant Competition Between Eleocharis Montevidensis and Scirpus Validus Along a Salinity Gradient in the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042593


University of Florida

2. Welch, Zachariah. Restoring Pattern Without Process in Lake Restoration A Large-Scale Littoral Habitat Enhancement Project on Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida.

Degree: PhD, Interdisciplinary Ecology, 2009, University of Florida

Muck removal is an extreme habitat restoration technique, where heavy machinery is used to remove dense vegetation and accumulated organic material from lake shorelines. This approach is used to combat accelerated plant growth and subsequent litter deposition, following decades of altered hydrologic schedules, elevated nutrient levels, and exotic species introductions. This study explored the efficacy of the technique, using results from the largest muck-removal application to date. Vegetation communities were monitored from 2002 to 2008, including two years prior to restoration and four years after. Before muck removal, Pontederia cordata represented the dominant community in the zone of annual water level fluctuation, as compared to Panicum repens, which was dominant in the 1950?s. Four years after muck removal, P. repens had expanded slightly from its pre-restoration levels, but the dominant species in treated areas was Vallisneria americana. This submersed species had no record of ever being prevalent in the system, and represented a novel community. Muck removal effects were short-lived in the shallowest areas of the littoral zone, with sites < 0.75 meters in depth recovering to pre-treatment levels within 3?4 years of reflooding. Deeper sites ( > 1.0 meter) generally had the largest impacts, with entirely new communities established within three years of treatment. These results suggest that future projects focus on deeper-water emergent communities, as dense vegetation may quickly recolonize shallow shorelines. There was concern among managers that hurricanes passing over the lake immediately following muck removal dramatically altered the outcome of the project, but this study found otherwise. While corresponding high water events undoubtedly delayed recovery in treated areas, the compositions of early colonizers were not changed. The same compositions found just prior to hurricane passage were found the following growing season, and the eventually-dominant communities did not appear until nearly two years after the storm events. These results suggest that initial water levels were less important in determining restored community types than the longer-term hydroperiods within treated areas. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Kitchens, Wiley M. (committee chair), Havens, Karl E. (committee member), Allen, Micheal S. (committee member), Wetzel, Paul (committee member), Conrads, Paul (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomass; Bodies of water; Ecology; Hurricanes; Lakes; Shorelines; Species; Vegetation; Water depth; Wetlands; aquatic, drawdown, drydown, habitat, lake, littoral, macrophyte, management, muck, pattern, plant, process, removal, restoration, tohopekaliga, vegetation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Welch, Z. (2009). Restoring Pattern Without Process in Lake Restoration A Large-Scale Littoral Habitat Enhancement Project on Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041053

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Welch, Zachariah. “Restoring Pattern Without Process in Lake Restoration A Large-Scale Littoral Habitat Enhancement Project on Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed April 02, 2020. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041053.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Welch, Zachariah. “Restoring Pattern Without Process in Lake Restoration A Large-Scale Littoral Habitat Enhancement Project on Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida.” 2009. Web. 02 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Welch Z. Restoring Pattern Without Process in Lake Restoration A Large-Scale Littoral Habitat Enhancement Project on Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. [cited 2020 Apr 02]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041053.

Council of Science Editors:

Welch Z. Restoring Pattern Without Process in Lake Restoration A Large-Scale Littoral Habitat Enhancement Project on Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041053


University of Florida

3. Zweig, Christa. Vegetation Ecology of an Impounded Wetland Information for Landscape-Level Restoration.

Degree: PhD, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, 2008, University of Florida

The Florida Everglades, an area of global significance, is an example of an ecosystem whose original pattern and process have been irrevocably altered and is currently the focus of a landscape level restoration effort. Projects of this scope, if they are to achieve the intended restoration, require substantial information regarding ecological mechanisms that are poorly understood. We provide critical information for the restoration of the Everglades and a methodological approach that affords the opportunity to expand knowledge of wetland vegetation pattern beyond the scope of our study area. To address the issue of the non-linear success of wetlands, we develop a general, non-spatial S & T succession conceptual model, and apply the general framework by creating annotated succession/management models as hypotheses for use in impact analysis on a portion of an imperiled wetland. We consider the application of these theories, our S & T succession models, as a fraction of the framework for the Everglades and our understanding will only build with time. They are hypotheses for use in adaptive management as the restoration of the Everglades continues. These models represent the community response to hydrology and illustrate which hydrologic values (temporal or seasonal) are important to community structure. We also synthesize recent literature on ridge and slough landscape maintenance and suggest additional mechanisms. We also demonstrate how these maintenance mechanisms have been disturbed, their effects on the landscape pattern, and how this creates alternate feedback loops that affect persistence of the multiple stable states of ridge and slough. We use techniques from previous analyses to assess the quality of habitat for the endangered Florida Snail Kite by tracking the dynamics of foraging communities within its reduced breeding range in the Everglades by use of multivariate analyses, and identify environmental and demographic correlates of vegetation community composition for habitat restoration purposes. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Kitchens, Wiley M. (committee chair), Bruna, Emilio M. (committee member), Frederick, Peter C. (committee member), Binford, Michael W. (committee member), Conrads, Paul (committee member), Wetzel, Paul (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Ecology; Everglades; Hydrology; Landscapes; Peat; Snails; Vegetation; Water conservation; Water depth; Wetlands

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zweig, C. (2008). Vegetation Ecology of an Impounded Wetland Information for Landscape-Level Restoration. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022810

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zweig, Christa. “Vegetation Ecology of an Impounded Wetland Information for Landscape-Level Restoration.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed April 02, 2020. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022810.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zweig, Christa. “Vegetation Ecology of an Impounded Wetland Information for Landscape-Level Restoration.” 2008. Web. 02 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Zweig C. Vegetation Ecology of an Impounded Wetland Information for Landscape-Level Restoration. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2020 Apr 02]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022810.

Council of Science Editors:

Zweig C. Vegetation Ecology of an Impounded Wetland Information for Landscape-Level Restoration. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022810

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