Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Florida" +contributor:("Kautz, Steven A."). Showing records 1 – 10 of 10 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Florida

1. Bowden, Mark. Measurement of Activity Specific Behavioral Recovery in Chronic Stroke.

Degree: PhD, Rehabilitation Science, 2009, University of Florida

 Current examinations of post-stroke motor control rely on interpretation of isolated movements performed during standardardized clinical examinations. Due to the complexity of human walking, however,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Electromyography; Gait; Legs; Paresis; Propulsion; Reflexes; Speed; Spinal cord; Strokes; Walking; biomechanics, emg, motor, reflexes, stoke, walking

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bowden, M. (2009). Measurement of Activity Specific Behavioral Recovery in Chronic Stroke. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024258

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bowden, Mark. “Measurement of Activity Specific Behavioral Recovery in Chronic Stroke.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024258.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bowden, Mark. “Measurement of Activity Specific Behavioral Recovery in Chronic Stroke.” 2009. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Bowden M. Measurement of Activity Specific Behavioral Recovery in Chronic Stroke. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024258.

Council of Science Editors:

Bowden M. Measurement of Activity Specific Behavioral Recovery in Chronic Stroke. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024258


University of Florida

2. Day, Kristin. Motor Control Solutions to Dynamic Stability Deficits during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury.

Degree: PhD, Rehabilitation Science, 2010, University of Florida

 Dynamic stability, defined as the ability to control one's center-of-mass (CoM) within a moving base-of-support, is a co-requisite of functional walking. Following a spinal cord… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Dynamic stability; Feet; Gait; Head; Pelvis; Physical trauma; Self help devices; Spinal cord; Treadmills; Walking; balance, control, cord, gait, injury, locomotion, motor, recovery, sci, spinal, stability, walking

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Day, K. (2010). Motor Control Solutions to Dynamic Stability Deficits during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041469

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Day, Kristin. “Motor Control Solutions to Dynamic Stability Deficits during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041469.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Day, Kristin. “Motor Control Solutions to Dynamic Stability Deficits during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury.” 2010. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Day K. Motor Control Solutions to Dynamic Stability Deficits during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041469.

Council of Science Editors:

Day K. Motor Control Solutions to Dynamic Stability Deficits during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041469


University of Florida

3. Nott, Cameron. Angular Momentum During Gait - A Computational Simulation.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2010, University of Florida

 There is a 73% incidence of falls among individuals with mild to moderate stroke. 37% of patients that fall sustain injury that required medical treatment.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Angular acceleration; Angular momentum; Feet; Foot joints; Gait; Kinematics; Modeling; Simulations; Treadmills; Walking; computational, gait, generation, power, simulation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nott, C. (2010). Angular Momentum During Gait - A Computational Simulation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042119

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nott, Cameron. “Angular Momentum During Gait - A Computational Simulation.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042119.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nott, Cameron. “Angular Momentum During Gait - A Computational Simulation.” 2010. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Nott C. Angular Momentum During Gait - A Computational Simulation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042119.

Council of Science Editors:

Nott C. Angular Momentum During Gait - A Computational Simulation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042119


University of Florida

4. Fox,Emily J. Locomotor Control and Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury.

Degree: PhD, Rehabilitation Science, 2011, University of Florida

 Animal studies indicate that walking and locomotor behaviors are partially controlled by oscillating spinal networks responsive to task-specific sensory input. Furthermore, the nervous system may… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Electromyography; Gait; Kinematics; Legs; Locomotion; Lower extremity; Physical trauma; Spinal cord; Treadmills; Walking; activation  – biomechanics  – children  – cpgs  – gait  – locomotor  – lt  – modules  – muscle  – recovery  – rehabilitation  – sci  – spinal  – spinalcord  – training  – walking

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

J, F. (2011). Locomotor Control and Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0043293

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

J, Fox,Emily. “Locomotor Control and Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0043293.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

J, Fox,Emily. “Locomotor Control and Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury.” 2011. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

J F. Locomotor Control and Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2011. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0043293.

Council of Science Editors:

J F. Locomotor Control and Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2011. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0043293


University of Florida

5. Blum, Adele. Plasticity of the central nervous system and functional recovery following spinal cord injury.

Degree: PhD, Medical Sciences - Neuroscience (IDP), 2010, University of Florida

 The focus of these studies was on plasticity of the central nervous system and functional recovery following a low thoracic hemisection in the cat. Functional… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Axons; Lesions; Locomotion; Materials recovery; Myelin; Neurons; Physical trauma; Rats; Scars; Spinal cord

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Blum, A. (2010). Plasticity of the central nervous system and functional recovery following spinal cord injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041439

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Blum, Adele. “Plasticity of the central nervous system and functional recovery following spinal cord injury.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041439.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Blum, Adele. “Plasticity of the central nervous system and functional recovery following spinal cord injury.” 2010. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Blum A. Plasticity of the central nervous system and functional recovery following spinal cord injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041439.

Council of Science Editors:

Blum A. Plasticity of the central nervous system and functional recovery following spinal cord injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041439


University of Florida

6. Barak, Sharon. Habitual Ambulatory Activity Measurement Post-stroke.

Degree: PhD, Rehabilitation Science, 2009, University of Florida

 This study had four main objectives: (1) to assess the rate of and predictors for inferred compliance with lower extremity Step Activity Monitor (SAM) protocol,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Accelerometers; Ambulation; Community life; Exercise; Gait; Guideline adherence; Lower extremity; Older adults; Strokes; Walking; accelerometer, ambulation, gait, measurement, recovery, stroke

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barak, S. (2009). Habitual Ambulatory Activity Measurement Post-stroke. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024289

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barak, Sharon. “Habitual Ambulatory Activity Measurement Post-stroke.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024289.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barak, Sharon. “Habitual Ambulatory Activity Measurement Post-stroke.” 2009. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Barak S. Habitual Ambulatory Activity Measurement Post-stroke. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024289.

Council of Science Editors:

Barak S. Habitual Ambulatory Activity Measurement Post-stroke. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024289


University of Florida

7. Jefferson, Stephanie. Behavioral and Anatomical Plasticity following Low Thoracic Hemisection and Chondroitinase ABC treatment in the Adult Cat Assessments of Locomotion and the Cough Reflex.

Degree: PhD, Medical Sciences - Neuroscience (IDP), 2009, University of Florida

 Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are potent inhibitors of neuronal growth following spinal cord injury (SCI). Digestion of CSPGs with Chondroitinase ABC (Ch'ase ABC) has been… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Axons; Brain; Cough; Lesions; Locomotion; Neurons; Physical trauma; Rats; Spinal cord; Treadmills; abdominis, axonal, basic, behavioral, bipedal, chondroitin, chondroitinase, cord, cough, cycle, drag, electromyogram, esophageal, feline, fluorogold, gait, growth, hemisection, hindlimb, injury, ipsilateral, locomotion, neurofilament, overground, paw, pegboard, plasticity, pressure, proteoglycan, recovery, rectus, reflex, rubrospinal, skilled, spinal, sulfate, supraspinal, synaptophysin, thoracic, tracing, tract

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jefferson, S. (2009). Behavioral and Anatomical Plasticity following Low Thoracic Hemisection and Chondroitinase ABC treatment in the Adult Cat Assessments of Locomotion and the Cough Reflex. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0023767

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jefferson, Stephanie. “Behavioral and Anatomical Plasticity following Low Thoracic Hemisection and Chondroitinase ABC treatment in the Adult Cat Assessments of Locomotion and the Cough Reflex.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0023767.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jefferson, Stephanie. “Behavioral and Anatomical Plasticity following Low Thoracic Hemisection and Chondroitinase ABC treatment in the Adult Cat Assessments of Locomotion and the Cough Reflex.” 2009. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Jefferson S. Behavioral and Anatomical Plasticity following Low Thoracic Hemisection and Chondroitinase ABC treatment in the Adult Cat Assessments of Locomotion and the Cough Reflex. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0023767.

Council of Science Editors:

Jefferson S. Behavioral and Anatomical Plasticity following Low Thoracic Hemisection and Chondroitinase ABC treatment in the Adult Cat Assessments of Locomotion and the Cough Reflex. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0023767


University of Florida

8. Balasubramanian, Chitralakshmi. Quantification of Asymmetrical Stepping Post-Stroke and Its Relationship to Hemiparetic Walking Performance.

Degree: PhD, Rehabilitation Science, 2008, University of Florida

 Asymmetrical stepping is a characteristic feature of hemiparetic walking and a result of sensorimotor deficits post-stroke. Asymmetry measures (that is, relative performance of paretic leg)… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Asymmetry; Feet; Gait; Kinetics; Legs; Paresis; Pelvis; Propulsion; Strokes; Walking; asymmetry, biomechanics, exercise, gait, quanitification, rehabilitation, step, stepping, stroke, walking

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Balasubramanian, C. (2008). Quantification of Asymmetrical Stepping Post-Stroke and Its Relationship to Hemiparetic Walking Performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022333

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Balasubramanian, Chitralakshmi. “Quantification of Asymmetrical Stepping Post-Stroke and Its Relationship to Hemiparetic Walking Performance.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022333.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Balasubramanian, Chitralakshmi. “Quantification of Asymmetrical Stepping Post-Stroke and Its Relationship to Hemiparetic Walking Performance.” 2008. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Balasubramanian C. Quantification of Asymmetrical Stepping Post-Stroke and Its Relationship to Hemiparetic Walking Performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022333.

Council of Science Editors:

Balasubramanian C. Quantification of Asymmetrical Stepping Post-Stroke and Its Relationship to Hemiparetic Walking Performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022333


University of Florida

9. Raja, Bhavana. Non-Paretic Leg Performance in Hemiparetic Walking: Loading Asymmetries, Compensatory Mechanisms and Responsiveness to Locomotor Training.

Degree: PhD, Rehabilitation Science, 2010, University of Florida

Subjects/Keywords: Electromyography; Gait; Kinematics; Knees; Legs; Low speed; Paresis; Strokes; Treadmills; Walking; compensation, forces, gait, ground, hemiparetic, locomotor, non, reaction, training

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Raja, B. (2010). Non-Paretic Leg Performance in Hemiparetic Walking: Loading Asymmetries, Compensatory Mechanisms and Responsiveness to Locomotor Training. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042166

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Raja, Bhavana. “Non-Paretic Leg Performance in Hemiparetic Walking: Loading Asymmetries, Compensatory Mechanisms and Responsiveness to Locomotor Training.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042166.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Raja, Bhavana. “Non-Paretic Leg Performance in Hemiparetic Walking: Loading Asymmetries, Compensatory Mechanisms and Responsiveness to Locomotor Training.” 2010. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Raja B. Non-Paretic Leg Performance in Hemiparetic Walking: Loading Asymmetries, Compensatory Mechanisms and Responsiveness to Locomotor Training. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042166.

Council of Science Editors:

Raja B. Non-Paretic Leg Performance in Hemiparetic Walking: Loading Asymmetries, Compensatory Mechanisms and Responsiveness to Locomotor Training. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042166


University of Florida

10. Nair, Preeti Mohandas. Neuromechanical and Neurophysiological Examination of Walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis in Non-Injured Individuals and Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.

Degree: PhD, Rehabilitation Science, 2008, University of Florida

 Clinicians often use orthotic devices to compensate for walking related impairments after incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI). Orthotic devices such as an ankle foot orthosis… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ankle; Ankle joint; Feet; Gait; Kinematics; Knees; Orthotic devices; Physical trauma; Spinal cord; Walking

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nair, P. M. (2008). Neuromechanical and Neurophysiological Examination of Walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis in Non-Injured Individuals and Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021651

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nair, Preeti Mohandas. “Neuromechanical and Neurophysiological Examination of Walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis in Non-Injured Individuals and Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021651.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nair, Preeti Mohandas. “Neuromechanical and Neurophysiological Examination of Walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis in Non-Injured Individuals and Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.” 2008. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Nair PM. Neuromechanical and Neurophysiological Examination of Walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis in Non-Injured Individuals and Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021651.

Council of Science Editors:

Nair PM. Neuromechanical and Neurophysiological Examination of Walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis in Non-Injured Individuals and Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021651

.