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You searched for +publisher:"University of Florida" +contributor:("Funderburk, Jamie Ruth"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Swan, Lawton K. Public Attitudes toward Therapy Framed by Common Factors and Specific Ingredients.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2013, University of Florida

Psychotherapy scholars have devoted considerable attention to resolving the question of how psychotherapy works: do specific psychological interventions target distinct psychopathologies, or do the nonspecific factors common to all forms of therapy—such as a compassionate therapist and a cogent rationale for treatment—account for successful treatment outcomes? Despite decades of psychotherapy process and outcome research, a clear answer has yet to emerge from the empirical data. Among psychotherapy consumers, however, recent evidence suggests a marked preference for common factors relative to specific interventions (“ingredients”). The present studies tested the notion that the public preference for therapy framed by common factors stems in part from the belief that the alternative, therapy which focuses on treating pathology(specific ingredients), carries a relatively higher risk of social stigmatization. Participants recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service (N = 98; Study 1) and SocialSci.com (N = 375; Study 2) each rated their attitudes toward seeking two varieties of psychotherapy: one emphasizing nonspecific common factors, and one emphasizing specific evidence-based therapy ingredients. Consistent with prior research, analyses revealed an overall preference for therapy framed by common factors. Differences in participants’ perceptions of stigmatization by others for seeking each type of therapy partially mediated this effect, supporting the specific ingredients stigma model articulated in Chapter 1. Exploratory analyses revealed that therapy preferences depended on whether participants considered treatment for themselves or for another person, and on the type of psychological problem participants anticipated experiencing. Implications for research and for campaigns attempting to improve public attitudes toward psychotherapy are discussed. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Heesacker, Martin (committee chair), Chambers, John Robert (committee member), Abrams, Lise (committee member), Hackett, David Gray (committee member), Funderburk, Jamie Ruth (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical psychology; Gene therapy; Psychological attitudes; Psychological counseling; Psychological research; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social psychology; Stigma; Stigmatization; help-seeking  – psychotherapy  – stigma

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APA (6th Edition):

Swan, L. K. (2013). Public Attitudes toward Therapy Framed by Common Factors and Specific Ingredients. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045887

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swan, Lawton K. “Public Attitudes toward Therapy Framed by Common Factors and Specific Ingredients.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045887.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swan, Lawton K. “Public Attitudes toward Therapy Framed by Common Factors and Specific Ingredients.” 2013. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Swan LK. Public Attitudes toward Therapy Framed by Common Factors and Specific Ingredients. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045887.

Council of Science Editors:

Swan LK. Public Attitudes toward Therapy Framed by Common Factors and Specific Ingredients. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045887

2. Locker, Taylor. Womens Experiences of Perceived Weight Based Discrimination and Psychological Distress a Test of Social Identity Theory.

Degree: PhD, Counseling Psychology - Psychology, 2013, University of Florida

diThis dissertation explores women’s experiences of perceived weight-based discrimination within a social identity theory framework to better understand the link between discrimination and adverse psychological consequences. Previous research has demonstrated that identity status within itself is a worse predictor of distress than discrimination associated with that identity status. For women of size, previous research has demonstrated the perception of discrimination based on weight is associated with poorer psychological outcomes such as greater depression, poorer body image, greater isolation, greater suicidal ideation, and lower self-esteem. However, no work to date has examined this phenomenon within a social identity theory framework. Social identity theory postulates that all individuals gain personal self-esteem through the self-esteem they gain by being associated with one or more social groups. This social or collective self-esteem is heightened if the person belongs to a valued group and is lessened if the person belongs to a devalued group. In this dissertation, a structural equation model tested a hypothesized model in which women’s reports of weight-based discrimination predict public collective self-esteem, which would then predict private collective self-esteem, which, in turn, would predict personal self-esteem, which finally would predict psychological distress, operationally defined as disordered eating and depression symptomatology in this dissertation. A weight,socioeconomic, and age diverse but primarily White and heterosexual sample of 216 women completed measures of weight-based discrimination, public collective self-esteem, private collective self-esteem, personal self-esteem, disordered eating and depression. Data obtained from this sample was used to test the hypothesized model through structural equation modeling. Results indicate the model fit the data well, superiorly to alternative logical models, and explained 64% of the variance associated with participants’ depression and 25% of participants’ disordered eating. Additionally, participants were able to recall various types of weight-based discrimination throughout the past year and their lifetime. Taken together, the results suggest the women sampled do perceive differential treatment based on weight which in turn affects their self-esteem by being reminded they belong to a devalued social group and affects their mental health. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Heesacker, Martin (committee chair), Miller, Scott A (committee member), Shehan, Constance L (committee member), Funderburk, Jamie Ruth (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Employment discrimination; Gender discrimination; Obesity; Psychological counseling; Psychological research; Psychology; Self esteem; Social discrimination; Social psychology; Weight based discrimination; depression  – disordered-eating  – self-esteem  – weight-discrimination  – women

…40 8 Abstract Of Dissertation Presented To The Graduate School Of The University Of… …Florida In Partial Fulfillment Of The Requirements For The Degree Of Doctor Of Philosophy… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Locker, T. (2013). Womens Experiences of Perceived Weight Based Discrimination and Psychological Distress a Test of Social Identity Theory. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Locker, Taylor. “Womens Experiences of Perceived Weight Based Discrimination and Psychological Distress a Test of Social Identity Theory.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Locker, Taylor. “Womens Experiences of Perceived Weight Based Discrimination and Psychological Distress a Test of Social Identity Theory.” 2013. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Locker T. Womens Experiences of Perceived Weight Based Discrimination and Psychological Distress a Test of Social Identity Theory. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045708.

Council of Science Editors:

Locker T. Womens Experiences of Perceived Weight Based Discrimination and Psychological Distress a Test of Social Identity Theory. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045708

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