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You searched for +publisher:"University of Edinburgh" +contributor:("Williams, Joanne"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Edinburgh

1. McColl, Judith. Children's Conceptions of the Brain.

Degree: 2012, University of Edinburgh

The present study explored children’s developing conceptions of the brain in order to enhance previous research and to contribute to debates regarding the nature of children’s naïve biological theories. 56 participants aged 5, 7 and 9-years-old were recruited from 2 different primary schools within Scotland, representing a broad range of socio-economic backgrounds. Results demonstrated that young children have a restricted view of the brain, regarding it in primarily psychological terms. Additionally, results revealed that children begin to demonstrate an understanding of the physiological characteristics and functions of the brain by the age of 9 years, however, that their understanding of the brain is incomplete at this age. Furthermore, children’s understanding was found to demonstrate coherence from the age of 9 years. Stemming from the findings, the study discusses educational implications and areas for future research to explore. Advisors/Committee Members: Williams, Joanne.

Subjects/Keywords: Children; Brain

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McColl, J. (2012). Children's Conceptions of the Brain. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8560

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McColl, Judith. “Children's Conceptions of the Brain.” 2012. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8560.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McColl, Judith. “Children's Conceptions of the Brain.” 2012. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

McColl J. Children's Conceptions of the Brain. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8560.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McColl J. Children's Conceptions of the Brain. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8560

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Edinburgh

2. Collins, Timothy. Children's Understanding of Animal Minds.

Degree: 2012, University of Edinburgh

This paper examines the development of children’s understanding of animals’ minds and mental capabilities over two experiments. Experiment 1 modified standard false-belief and discrepant-desire tasks in two age-groups (3-4 and 7-8 years) to test developmental and species differences in children’ basic cognitive reasoning about animal and human minds. Experiment 2 incorporated a modified mental-capacity rating task in three age-groups (3-4-, 7-8 years, and adults) to investigate developmental changes in children’s judgements of appropriate mental-capacity terms in animals of different species. Mixed-model two-way ANOVA was used in both experiments to calculate age-group, species and age-group species interaction effects, and post-hoc analysis was used where appropriate. Analysis revealed developmental trends in both experiments. In Experiment 1, modified task performance improved between 3-4 years, and peaked at 7-8 years, but showed no species differences. In Experiment 2, there was a developmental trend towards more extensive and consistent species differentiations. Findings are discussed with reference to the origins of animal mentality concepts in relation to naïve biology and psychology and the implications for children’s everyday interactions with animals. Advisors/Committee Members: Williams, Joanne.

Subjects/Keywords: Children; Animals; Theory of Mind; Theory of Animal Mind

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Collins, T. (2012). Children's Understanding of Animal Minds. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8526

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Collins, Timothy. “Children's Understanding of Animal Minds.” 2012. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8526.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Collins, Timothy. “Children's Understanding of Animal Minds.” 2012. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Collins T. Children's Understanding of Animal Minds. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8526.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Collins T. Children's Understanding of Animal Minds. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8526

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Edinburgh

3. Rutherford, Siobhan. Can Dogs Be ‘Child’s Best Friend’?.

Degree: 2013, University of Edinburgh

Pre-school children are at the highest risk of being bitten by dogs, and previous research suggests that this is due to limitations in their emotion recognition ability. The use of stimuli in emotion recognition literature has been criticised for being limited by using photographs as videos acquire better performance. 25 pre-schoolers from Edinburgh aged 3 – 5 years old (mean age=4.1 years) were shown photos and videos of dogs and humans displaying the four basic emotions (anger, happiness, sadness and fear) and were asked how they thought the dog or human was feeling. They were then asked what body parts they were looking at to be able to tell this, and why the child thought they could be feeling this way. Their attitude towards dogs and ability to understand that dogs have emotions was also compared to their dog emotion recognition performance. T-test comparisons found that pre-schoolers performed significantly better in the human (M=87%) than dog condition (M=43%), but stimulus type had no effect on performance. Children mainly attended to the face when looking at humans but looked at the whole body when recognising emotions in dogs. Attitude and ability to understand that dogs have emotions had no effect on ability to recognise dog emotions. Experience with dogs did not seem to have an effect but sampling limitations did not allow for inferential testing. The addition of sound to the stimuli in the future could aid video emotion recognition. If this did improve performance it could be helpful in dog bite prevention programmes and may in turn reduce the number of dog bite incidents. Similarly, if eye-tracking studies were carried out on similar stimuli, prevention programmes could assist children in learning where they need to attend to in order to recognise a dog’s emotion by focusing upon their weaknesses. Advisors/Committee Members: Williams, Joanne.

Subjects/Keywords: emotion recognition; dog bites; humans; pre-school children; dogs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rutherford, S. (2013). Can Dogs Be ‘Child’s Best Friend’?. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/6590

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rutherford, Siobhan. “Can Dogs Be ‘Child’s Best Friend’?.” 2013. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/6590.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rutherford, Siobhan. “Can Dogs Be ‘Child’s Best Friend’?.” 2013. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Rutherford S. Can Dogs Be ‘Child’s Best Friend’?. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/6590.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rutherford S. Can Dogs Be ‘Child’s Best Friend’?. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/6590

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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