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You searched for +publisher:"University of Edinburgh" +contributor:("Sarah, MacPherson"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Edinburgh

1. Olga, Wudarczyk. The effect of anticipatory psychosocial stress on frontal executive functions.

Degree: 2010, University of Edinburgh

Previous research has found that stress hormone cortisol affects cognition, especially those cognitive abilities associated with the areas of the brain abundant in glucocorticoid receptors (e.g. Lupien & McEwen, 1997). Most studies have shown negative effects of induced stress on the functions associated with the hippocampus. Less research has investigated the effects of stress on executive functions, associated with the frontal lobes, also rich in glucocorticoid receptors. The evidence of the effects of stress on frontal functions has been mixed. The present study investigated the effects of induced psychosocial stress on tests of executive functions, both traditional (Verbal Fluency and Cognitive Estimates) and ecologically valid (Zoo Map), in younger adults. 40 healthy female students were exposed to psychosocial stress by having them anticipate a public speech; and a non-stressed condition prior to the performance on the tests of executive functions. Skin conductance and heart rate were measured throughout the experiment to record changes in physiological responses to stress and questionnaires were used to assess participants’ perception of stress. Results showed that participants in the stress condition experienced significantly more negative emotions than participants in the control condition, as measured by questionnaires. Significant differences between performance on traditional and ecologically valid executive tasks were not found, however participants in the stress condition performed not significantly better at the Zoo Map task. The results demonstrated that executive functions might not be affected when participants are exposed to stress prior to the tasks of executive functions. Nonetheless, they may be affected by stress in a Yerkes-Dodson Law pattern. Advisors/Committee Members: Sarah, MacPherson.

Subjects/Keywords: stress; executive functions; frontal lobes; cortisol; Zoo Map task; Verbal Fluency; Cognitive Estimates

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olga, W. (2010). The effect of anticipatory psychosocial stress on frontal executive functions. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/4980

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olga, Wudarczyk. “The effect of anticipatory psychosocial stress on frontal executive functions.” 2010. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/4980.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olga, Wudarczyk. “The effect of anticipatory psychosocial stress on frontal executive functions.” 2010. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Olga W. The effect of anticipatory psychosocial stress on frontal executive functions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/4980.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Olga W. The effect of anticipatory psychosocial stress on frontal executive functions. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/4980

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Edinburgh

2. Barnes, Jenna. Cognitive Ageing: The Effects of Disruption on Multitasking Abilities in Healthy Adults.

Degree: 2013, University of Edinburgh

The ability to multitask is an incredibly important aspect of everyday life and it is thought that the cognitive processes used for multitasking are mediated by the frontal lobes (Stuss & Alexander, 2000). Patients with frontal lobe damage have been shown to be impaired in their ability to multitask, despite having normal IQ’s. It is thought that as human adult’s age, the frontal lobes deteriorate, so there is a possibility that that multitasking skills will also be impaired in older adults. While performing daily tasks we often experience disruptions such as having to answer the phone, send a text message or answer the door. This study investigated the effects of disruption on multitasking abilities in younger and older adults using the cooking breakfast task originally developed by Craik and Bialystok (2006). With creating a non-computerised version of the task, participants were required to ‘cook’ foods by starting and stopping timers next to cardboard imitations of each food. The task was carried out with two versions, one with no disruption and the other with a disruption; participants were required to halt cooking and take part in a silly sentences task (Baddeley, Logie, Nimmo-Smith & Brereton, 1985). Two age groups (18-24 and 60-85) were tested. There was a significant difference between multitasking performance for younger and older adults, but no significant effects of disruption were found. This finding suggests that older adults are more impaired in multitasking abilities compared to younger adults. Further implications for this theory and the effects of disruptions on multitasking are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Sarah, MacPherson.

Subjects/Keywords: Multitasking; Disruptions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barnes, J. (2013). Cognitive Ageing: The Effects of Disruption on Multitasking Abilities in Healthy Adults. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8565

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barnes, Jenna. “Cognitive Ageing: The Effects of Disruption on Multitasking Abilities in Healthy Adults.” 2013. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8565.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barnes, Jenna. “Cognitive Ageing: The Effects of Disruption on Multitasking Abilities in Healthy Adults.” 2013. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Barnes J. Cognitive Ageing: The Effects of Disruption on Multitasking Abilities in Healthy Adults. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8565.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Barnes J. Cognitive Ageing: The Effects of Disruption on Multitasking Abilities in Healthy Adults. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8565

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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