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You searched for +publisher:"University of Edinburgh" +contributor:("Forbes, John"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Edinburgh

1. Zolala, Farzaneh. Exploring routine data collection systems in Iran, focussing on maternal mortality and using the city of Bam as a case study.

Degree: 2011, University of Edinburgh

Introduction: Health information systems provide information obtained from data for decision making in order to improve the performance of a health system. Although health information systems can be very influential, it can not be exit on its own. It is discussed that the flaw and inefficiency of health information system is rooted to the powerlessness of health system and lack of incorporation in the overall health system [1]. The benefits of using data in planning and implementation go beyond the normal everyday functions of a heath system and include catastrophic situations. Iran is a developing country which experiences a large number of natural disasters each year with a significant number of casualties. Owing to the importance of data for planning, implementation and evaluation, the necessity for sound data is even more pronounced in a country with such conditions. The main aim of this project is to use the city of Bam as a case study to explore the routinely collected data systems in Iran. This investigated the collection of mortality data from all causes, and maternal mortality specifically, in order to determine the usefulness and application of these data systems to monitor the immediate and ongoing health effects of a natural disaster, and to plan for future disasters. Methods: A mixed qualitative and quantitative method used to provide better understanding of the problem at two main data sources, the Medical University and the Civil Registry. This research has commenced with numeric results of maternal ratios and then has employed a qualitative method to gain better understanding of data collection system. The sampling methods are purposive and probability sampling. Interviews, review of documents, and personal observation are the main data collection methods. The data are analysed using qualitative and quantitative methods. They are presented in four sub –chapters , three sub-chapters for non numeric results and one for numeric results. Results: The results show that there are dramatic differences on data collection and data processing between the Civil Registry and the Medical Sciences University. Also it is found that there are some sorts of shortcomings in different stages of data collection system in each organisation. This includes incomplete data coverage, shortcoming in academic staff, insufficient technology infrastructures, lack of training for staff, inadequate data quality checking. Moreover, there are many limitations affecting data collection after the earthquake. These limitations are rooted in basic problems within the existing data collection system and a lack of co-ordination between the groups collecting the data, including national and international aid groups that provided help after the earthquake. Regarding maternal mortality data collection it is found that there was no consistent definition of maternal deaths among interviewees. All data sources are not aware of urgently reporting of maternal deaths as it should be. The results of the estimation of maternal mortality ratios from… Advisors/Committee Members: Forbes, John, Warner, Pam, Pollack, Allyson.

Subjects/Keywords: health information; maternal mortality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zolala, F. (2011). Exploring routine data collection systems in Iran, focussing on maternal mortality and using the city of Bam as a case study. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5962

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zolala, Farzaneh. “Exploring routine data collection systems in Iran, focussing on maternal mortality and using the city of Bam as a case study.” 2011. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5962.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zolala, Farzaneh. “Exploring routine data collection systems in Iran, focussing on maternal mortality and using the city of Bam as a case study.” 2011. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Zolala F. Exploring routine data collection systems in Iran, focussing on maternal mortality and using the city of Bam as a case study. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5962.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zolala F. Exploring routine data collection systems in Iran, focussing on maternal mortality and using the city of Bam as a case study. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5962

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Edinburgh

2. Gallimore, Annette. Barriers to innovation transfer in a remote and rural health, social care & housing setting.

Degree: 2011, University of Edinburgh

Introduction: The transfer of good practice into a new area is seldom straightforward. This study investigates the process leading up to transfer in a project which aimed to transfer best practice into health, social care and housing in a remote and rural area. The specific practice was the use of electronic tablets for single shared assessment. The study aimed to answer the Research Question ‘What factors enable or hinder successful practice transfer within a remote and rural setting?’ This was addressed by asking three main sub-questions: - how and why did the key people select electronic single shared assessment for transfer? - what were the attitudes of staff to the electronic tablets for single shared assessment? - what key issues influenced the process leading up to practice transfer? Methodology: A case study design and qualitative research methods were used. Rogers’ theory of diffusion of innovations was used to design a framework for assessment of evidence against the broad areas of the diffusion process. It provided a checklist of elements characterising the active process of diffusion of new practice or innovation. Semi-structured interviews were held with key stakeholders in the implementation and management of the transfer of electronic single shared assessment. Documents including progress reports, minutes of meetings and emails were reviewed. Data was coded and categorised using the qualitative data package QSR N6, a software tool which assists the user to manage data and ideas. Grounded theory was used to analyse and code data. Emerging themes were established against organisational change theory. Themes were then categorised and interpreted against the framework. Results: The lack of time for the project lead to drive the project and insufficient slack resources arising from the rural setting were key reasons for the delay in practice transfer. The project focus shifted from the transfer of electronic single shared assessment to the transfer of improvements to single shared assessment itself. Key aspects of the results reflected theory around the factors influencing organisational change and knowledge transfer. The framework was successful in providing a structure against which the stages of practice transfer could be checked in relation to organisational change. Three gaps were identified: the framework did not allow for technological change in the arrival of laptops instead of electronic computer tablets; the measurement of time corresponding to the slow progress of the project, and the inability of high level management to resolve the issue of IT incompatibility. None of the gaps significantly affected analysis of the study findings. Conclusion: Transfer of good practice requires leadership, resources, and ownership from frontline users. Slack resources, including time, will be key in whether practice transfer will be completed successfully and the new practice sustained across all geographical project areas. More research is needed on transfer of practice in health, social care and housing… Advisors/Committee Members: Mackie, Phil, Forbes, John.

Subjects/Keywords: Innovation transfer; Knowledge transfer; Rural health services

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gallimore, A. (2011). Barriers to innovation transfer in a remote and rural health, social care & housing setting. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8736

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gallimore, Annette. “Barriers to innovation transfer in a remote and rural health, social care & housing setting.” 2011. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8736.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gallimore, Annette. “Barriers to innovation transfer in a remote and rural health, social care & housing setting.” 2011. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Gallimore A. Barriers to innovation transfer in a remote and rural health, social care & housing setting. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8736.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gallimore A. Barriers to innovation transfer in a remote and rural health, social care & housing setting. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8736

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.