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You searched for +publisher:"University of Delaware" +contributor:("Kaminski, Thomas W."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Delaware

1. Caccese, Jaclyn B. Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Delaware

Soccer is the most popular sport worldwide with over 265 million active players. Soccer is unique in that you can use your head to advance the ball and purposeful heading is an integral part of the game. However, some have suggested that repeated heading of the soccer ball is associated with neurological deficits, though others have claimed that deficits are related to multiple head injuries. Still others have observed no neurological deficits. Ultimately, these studies are limited in that they often examine small, homogenous populations. With over 3 million youth soccer players and nearly 1 million high school soccer players competing across the United States each year, more research is needed to determine the risk associated with repeated purposeful heading, particularly among youth and high school athletes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare head acceleration during purposeful soccer heading across age and gender, determine what factors predict higher head acceleration values, and investigate acute changes in vestibular/ocular function and postural control with purposeful soccer heading. At the collegiate and high school levels, female soccer players exhibited higher head accelerations than their male counterparts, suggesting that if female soccer players experience a similar number of headers as their male counterparts, females may be exposed to greater cumulative head accelerations from repeated heading of a soccer ball over a career of soccer. Greater neck girth, head-neck segment mass, and neck strength predicted lower peak linear and rotational acceleration and may have contributed to the observed gender differences. On average, soccer players presented with higher sway velocity post-heading compared to control participants, but no other group deficits in postural control or vestibular/ocular function were observed. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaminski, Thomas W..

Subjects/Keywords: Biological sciences; Concussion; Heading; Neck strength; Postural control; Repetitive head impacts; Soccer; Sub-concussion

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APA (6th Edition):

Caccese, J. B. (2016). Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Delaware. Retrieved from http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caccese, Jaclyn B. “Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Delaware. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caccese, Jaclyn B. “Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players.” 2016. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Caccese JB. Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Delaware; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614.

Council of Science Editors:

Caccese JB. Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Delaware; 2016. Available from: http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614


University of Delaware

2. Wisthoff, Bethany A. Long-term effects following an acute lateral ankle sprain in a college-aged population.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Delaware

The ankle is the most common body part injured by an athletic population with ankle sprains consisting of 77% of all ankle injuries. Approximately 72% of patients following an ankle sprain have reported residual symptoms six to 18 months later. Of those that reported residual symptoms, 40% reported at least one moderate to severe symptom, which included: perceived ankle weakness, perceived ankle instability, pain, and swelling. Previous research has shown that approximately 30% of patients suffering an initial ankle sprain will develop chronic ankle instability. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is defined by those that have suffered recurrent ankle sprains, may have prolonged symptoms, and may exhibit mechanical and/or functional instability. Functional deficits have been seen in those with CAI, specifically to postural control or dynamic balance. The overall purpose of the current study was to determine if differences existed in the severity of the ankle sprain, pain, and dorsiflexion range-of-motion (DFROM) and the long-term effects of talocrural joint laxity, ligament thickness, and dynamic balance measures after an acute ankle sprain (AAS) in a college-aged population. Secondarily, to determine if differences occur in these measures between AAS, CAI, and to those without a history of ankle sprains (CON). Those who experienced an AAS had increased inversion (INV) stress, INV talofibular interval (TI), and anterior drawer (AD) stress compared to CON and CAI. Anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) thickness was greater in AAS than CON, and greater in CAI than CON. In DFROM, CAI had less ROM than CON. In the Y Balance Test (YBT), CAI had less relative reach distance in anterior (ANT), posteromedial (PM), and composite (COMP) compared to CON. AAS also had less COMP percentage than CAI and CON. As clinicians, we must be aware that those who sustain a lateral ankle sprain should be assessed in the areas mentioned (range-of-motion, ankle laxity, musculoskeletal ultrasound, dynamic balance) to determine if differences exist over time. This research shows that those that have sustained an AAS, regardless of whether or not they have sprained that ankle before, still show deficits in ankle laxity, ROM, and dynamic balance 6-months later; however, those with CAI continue demonstrating deficits over time. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaminski, Thomas W..

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wisthoff, B. A. (2019). Long-term effects following an acute lateral ankle sprain in a college-aged population. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Delaware. Retrieved from http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/24731

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wisthoff, Bethany A. “Long-term effects following an acute lateral ankle sprain in a college-aged population.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Delaware. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/24731.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wisthoff, Bethany A. “Long-term effects following an acute lateral ankle sprain in a college-aged population.” 2019. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Wisthoff BA. Long-term effects following an acute lateral ankle sprain in a college-aged population. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Delaware; 2019. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/24731.

Council of Science Editors:

Wisthoff BA. Long-term effects following an acute lateral ankle sprain in a college-aged population. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Delaware; 2019. Available from: http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/24731

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