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You searched for +publisher:"University of Dayton" +contributor:("Thompson, Teresa L."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Dayton

1. Parker, Jessica Lynn. The “Party School” Factor: How Messages About Alcohol Use at Universities Influence Prospective Students’ Perceptions.

Degree: MA, Communication, 2009, University of Dayton

This three-phase study was designed to determine what messages prospective students receive about alcohol use and partying at a university, how these messages affect who is most attracted to the university, and whether different types of university messages attract students with different characteristics. Interviews with first-year students at the University of Dayton (UD) revealed that most students heard messages about alcohol use and partying before deciding to attend. A survey of UD undergraduate students, which asked for retrospective reflection on their experiences as prospective students, found a significant correlation between having a positive view of UD after hearing these messages and being party- and alcohol-oriented, as measured by factors such as viewing partying as important, having the intention to drink alcohol in college, and having previous experiences of drinking to intoxication. A survey of high school students showed that a hypothetical university with many weekend activities and strong enforcement of drinking age laws is most attractive to prospective students. A "party school" and a school with many activities but little law enforcement both attracted primarily party- and alcohol-oriented high school students, whereas a school with many activities and strong enforcement was attractive to all types of students. Post-secondary schools with "party school" reputations are encouraged to focus on weekend activity promotion and enforcement of alcohol laws to avoid continually attracting a concentration of heavy drinkers. Advisors/Committee Members: Thompson, Teresa L. (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Academic Guidance Counseling; Behaviorial Sciences; Communication; Community Colleges; Education; Health; Higher Education; Public Health; School Administration; party school; college choice; binge drinking; college students; alcohol; symbolic interactionism

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APA (6th Edition):

Parker, J. L. (2009). The “Party School” Factor: How Messages About Alcohol Use at Universities Influence Prospective Students’ Perceptions. (Masters Thesis). University of Dayton. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239892411

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parker, Jessica Lynn. “The “Party School” Factor: How Messages About Alcohol Use at Universities Influence Prospective Students’ Perceptions.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Dayton. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239892411.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parker, Jessica Lynn. “The “Party School” Factor: How Messages About Alcohol Use at Universities Influence Prospective Students’ Perceptions.” 2009. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Parker JL. The “Party School” Factor: How Messages About Alcohol Use at Universities Influence Prospective Students’ Perceptions. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Dayton; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239892411.

Council of Science Editors:

Parker JL. The “Party School” Factor: How Messages About Alcohol Use at Universities Influence Prospective Students’ Perceptions. [Masters Thesis]. University of Dayton; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239892411


University of Dayton

2. Miller, Nicole Ann. Individual and Cultural Factors Affecting Students' Anxiety During Language Study Abroad.

Degree: MA, Communication, 2009, University of Dayton

Submersing oneself in a foreign culture for an extended amount of time is a complex process, and students who study abroad experience varying degrees of anxiety while doing so. The present study uses Anxiety/Uncertainty Management Theory and Communication Accommodation Theory to identify certain factors related to this anxiety. Quantitative data in Phase One measured students’ uses of idiomatic expressions in the homestay, ability to tolerate ambiguity, time spent with the host family and proficiency levels to find them all significantly related to anxiety at moderate levels. Phase Two expanded to look at cultural factors associated with anxiety. Students from individualistic cultures experienced significantly lower levels of anxiety while studying a second language in a classroom than students who identify as more collectivistic. Finally, as more time passed, individualistic students displayed higher frequencies of upward convergence behaviors toward individuals from the collectivistic culture. Advisors/Committee Members: Thompson, Teresa L. (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Language; study abroad; anxiety; homestay; communication accommodation; cultural identity; AUM Theory; L2 acquisition

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APA (6th Edition):

Miller, N. A. (2009). Individual and Cultural Factors Affecting Students' Anxiety During Language Study Abroad. (Masters Thesis). University of Dayton. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239981295

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Nicole Ann. “Individual and Cultural Factors Affecting Students' Anxiety During Language Study Abroad.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Dayton. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239981295.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Nicole Ann. “Individual and Cultural Factors Affecting Students' Anxiety During Language Study Abroad.” 2009. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Miller NA. Individual and Cultural Factors Affecting Students' Anxiety During Language Study Abroad. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Dayton; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239981295.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller NA. Individual and Cultural Factors Affecting Students' Anxiety During Language Study Abroad. [Masters Thesis]. University of Dayton; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1239981295


University of Dayton

3. Ramaccia, Julie Brady. What am I Eating? The Use of Health and Environmental Messages in Predicting a Sustainable Diet.

Degree: MA, Communication, 2011, University of Dayton

This study examines 161 participants’ behavior change in regard to purchasing organic and/or local foods after message exposure. Although much health research and environmental research exist, no research has combined these fields and applied them to behavior change. Participants were exposed to a health message, an environmental message, or a combined health and environmental message. Using the theory of planned behavior as the theoretical foundation, participants’ attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control and behavioral intention were also used as prediction measures for behavior change. Participant cognitions were also coded through a thought-listing measure. The results of this study reveal that participant attitudes, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control all predicted behavioral intention; however, these individual variables did not predict actual behavior. Participant cognitions were found to be reflective of the message type that was read. Additionally, while both political preference and age individually and in interaction with message type influenced behavior, sex individually and in interaction with message type did not. Advisors/Committee Members: Thompson, Teresa L. (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Agriculture; Behavioral Sciences; Communication; Conservation; Environmental Health; Health; Health Education; Public Health; Public Health Education; Sustainability; health messages; environmental message; communication; theory of planned behavior; health behavior; sustainability; agriculture

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APA (6th Edition):

Ramaccia, J. B. (2011). What am I Eating? The Use of Health and Environmental Messages in Predicting a Sustainable Diet. (Masters Thesis). University of Dayton. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1304384504

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramaccia, Julie Brady. “What am I Eating? The Use of Health and Environmental Messages in Predicting a Sustainable Diet.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Dayton. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1304384504.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramaccia, Julie Brady. “What am I Eating? The Use of Health and Environmental Messages in Predicting a Sustainable Diet.” 2011. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ramaccia JB. What am I Eating? The Use of Health and Environmental Messages in Predicting a Sustainable Diet. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Dayton; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1304384504.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramaccia JB. What am I Eating? The Use of Health and Environmental Messages in Predicting a Sustainable Diet. [Masters Thesis]. University of Dayton; 2011. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1304384504

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