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You searched for +publisher:"University of Dayton" +contributor:("Chong, Andy"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Dayton

1. Zang, Yimin. Simulation of the Optical Loop Mirror in Ultrafast Fiber Lasers.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Electro-Optics, 2018, University of Dayton

The ultrafast fiber laser system, which can generate the pulse with short duration and high peak power, has many technological applications. The mode-locking mechanism is widely applied to construct an ultrafast laser system. The saturable absorber action, which is characterized by higher transmittance at higher power input, is the key component to make a passive mode-locked laser. The thesis is focused on the simulation of the nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and the nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM) inside the fiber laser cavity to create a fast saturable absorber action. Relationships between NOLM/NALM properties and output pulses’ peak power and energy are discussed in detail. In particular, the transform-limited pulse characteristics of both pulse duration and spectral width are examined. The generation of shorter pulses with higher peak power are explored. Advisors/Committee Members: Chong, Andy (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Optics; Mode-locked fiber lasers; Nonlinear optical loop mirror; Nonlinear amplifying loop mirror; Saturable absorbing action; Ultrafast pulse propagation

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APA (6th Edition):

Zang, Y. (2018). Simulation of the Optical Loop Mirror in Ultrafast Fiber Lasers. (Masters Thesis). University of Dayton. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1523377900786586

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zang, Yimin. “Simulation of the Optical Loop Mirror in Ultrafast Fiber Lasers.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Dayton. Accessed March 26, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1523377900786586.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zang, Yimin. “Simulation of the Optical Loop Mirror in Ultrafast Fiber Lasers.” 2018. Web. 26 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Zang Y. Simulation of the Optical Loop Mirror in Ultrafast Fiber Lasers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Dayton; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1523377900786586.

Council of Science Editors:

Zang Y. Simulation of the Optical Loop Mirror in Ultrafast Fiber Lasers. [Masters Thesis]. University of Dayton; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1523377900786586


University of Dayton

2. Wan, Chenchen. Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators.

Degree: PhD, Electro-Optics, 2017, University of Dayton

Optical frequency combs are coherent light sources consist of thousands of equally spaced frequency lines. Frequency combs have achieved success in applications of metrology, spectroscopy and precise pulse manipulation and control. The most common way to generate frequency combs is based on mode-locked lasers which has the output spectrum of comb structures. To generate stable frequency combs, the output from mode-locked lasers need to be phase stabilized. The whole comb lines will be stabilized if the pulse train repetition rate corresponding to comb spacing and the pulse carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency are both stabilized. The output from a laser always has fluctuations in parameters known as noise. In laser applications, noise is an important factor to limit the performance and often need to be well controlled. For example in precision measurement such as frequency metrology and precise spectroscopy, low laser intensity and phase noise is required. In mode-locked lasers there are different types of noise like intensity noise, pulse temporal position noise also known as timing jitter, optical phase noise. In term for frequency combs, these noise dynamics is more complex and often related. Understanding the noise behavior is not only of great interest in practical applications but also help understand fundamental laser physics.In this dissertation, the noise of frequency combs and mode-locked lasers will be studied in two projects. First, the CEO frequency phase noise of a synchronously pumped doubly resonant optical parametric oscillators (OPO) will be explored. This is very important for applications of the OPO as a coherent frequency comb source. Another project will focus on the intensity noise coupling in a soliton fiber oscillator, the finding of different noise coupling in soliton pulses and the dispersive waves generated from soliton perturbation can provide very practical guidance for low noise soliton laser design. OPOs are used to generate coherent laser-like radiations at which frequency the common gain material is not available. It is also a good candidate for extend frequency comb spectral range, for comb generation, the OPO is usually pumped by a comb source thus the OPO cavity needs to be synchronized to the pump pulses. Depending on whether the signal or idle light is in resonance, the OPO could be singly or doubly resonant. The doubly resonant OPO (DOPO) has much lower lasing threshold since both signal and idle are in resonance, but it also requires more cavity stability and was historically considered unstable for operation. However, recent research has proved that the synchronously pumped doubly resonant OPO could operate even without active cavity stabilization. Moreover, when the OPO is in degenerate state where the signal and idler are identical the OPO will remain frequency stabilized because it's acting as a frequency divide-by-2 system. This makes the DOPO an excellent candidate for extending the frequency comb spectral range to mid-IR by pumping with a frequency comb at near IR… Advisors/Committee Members: Chong, Andy (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Optics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wan, C. (2017). Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Dayton. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1493915721069409

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wan, Chenchen. “Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Dayton. Accessed March 26, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1493915721069409.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wan, Chenchen. “Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators.” 2017. Web. 26 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Wan C. Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Dayton; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1493915721069409.

Council of Science Editors:

Wan C. Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Dayton; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1493915721069409

3. Bauer, Mitchell D. Characterization and Correction of Spatial Misalignment in Head-Mounted Displays.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Electro-Optics, 2017, University of Dayton

A toolset was developed for characterizing and correcting spatial misalignment in head-mounted displays. A hardware system consisting of two cameras and various rotation and translation stages was used to emulate the ocular position of most human observers. A checkerboard pattern was displayed on the HMDs and matched to a reference pattern through an image registration process. The HMD image registration process is carried out after the effects of camera distortion and keystone effect are removed. The registration process is repeatable with a standard deviation of less than one HMD pixel.The relative misalignment between left and right eyes was fairly small in the center of the displays, and increased near the edges and corners. Small rotations simulating an imperfectly aligned HMD had little effect on the misalignment present. The introduction of vergence angles did have a large effect on misalignment. Several methods were used to correct misalignment, including different corrections for the left and right eyes, and the use of a composite correction incorporating different correction maps in different local regions of the display. Both of these methods showed improve uniformity and rectilinearity in test images displayed on the HMD. The composite correction map did show noticeable global variations. The luminance of an HMD was also characterized, showing higher luminance in the center of the display than in the corners by a factor of three. Advisors/Committee Members: Chong, Andy (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Optics; head-mounted displays; HMD; misalignment; optical aberrations; image registration; distortion; luminance; virtual reality; augmented reality; biocular, binocular; human factors; vision; vergence; eyestrain; visual fatigue; symbology; aviator

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bauer, M. D. (2017). Characterization and Correction of Spatial Misalignment in Head-Mounted Displays. (Masters Thesis). University of Dayton. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1510943954851583

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bauer, Mitchell D. “Characterization and Correction of Spatial Misalignment in Head-Mounted Displays.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Dayton. Accessed March 26, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1510943954851583.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bauer, Mitchell D. “Characterization and Correction of Spatial Misalignment in Head-Mounted Displays.” 2017. Web. 26 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Bauer MD. Characterization and Correction of Spatial Misalignment in Head-Mounted Displays. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Dayton; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1510943954851583.

Council of Science Editors:

Bauer MD. Characterization and Correction of Spatial Misalignment in Head-Mounted Displays. [Masters Thesis]. University of Dayton; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1510943954851583

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