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You searched for +publisher:"University of Connecticut" +contributor:("Amy Gorin, PhD"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Connecticut

1. Braun, Tosca. Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Differentially Predict Eating Behaviors Among Emerging Adults.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2015, University of Connecticut

Objectives: Poor eating behaviors (EB) and food cravings (FC) represent risk factors for obesity and related outcomes. Mindfulness and self-compassion (SC) have been individually linked to healthful EB in prior research, representing salient intervention targets. While conceptualized as having health behavioral self-regulatory benefits, no research has examined these variables’ differential contributions to EB and FC. Method: Participants were 283 university undergraduates (152 females; m. age = 19.1 + 1.6; m. BMI = 23.7 + 4.2 kg/m2). Multiple regression analyses in women (W) and men (M) assessed how validated measures of mindfulness and SC were associated with Fruit/Vegetable intake (FV), Emotional Eating (EE), Uncontrolled Eating (UE), Restrained Eating (RE), and FC, after controlling for distress and BMI in Step 1. In Model 1, mindfulness was entered in Step 2, and SC in Step 3; the order was reversed in Model 2. Results: Mindfulness significantly predicted FV and FC in men, and EE/UE in both genders. Results for SC differed by Model and gender. Neither construct predicted RE. Overall, mindfulness emerged a stronger predictor of eating behaviors among M than W. While the pattern of results was mixed among W by model, SC robustly and consistently predicted EE. Conclusion: These results partially replicate the previously observed relationship of mindfulness to EE, UE, and FV, and generate speculation that mindfulness may be particularly helpful for fostering healthful EB among M, whereas SC training may be prove a salient target of intervention for W high in EE Advisors/Committee Members: Amy Gorin, PhD, Diane Quinn, PhD, Crystal Park, PhD.

Subjects/Keywords: Self-compassion; mindfulness; eating behavior; emotional eating; food cravings; diet; obesity; BMI

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Braun, T. (2015). Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Differentially Predict Eating Behaviors Among Emerging Adults. (Masters Thesis). University of Connecticut. Retrieved from https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/792

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Braun, Tosca. “Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Differentially Predict Eating Behaviors Among Emerging Adults.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Connecticut. Accessed April 24, 2019. https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/792.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Braun, Tosca. “Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Differentially Predict Eating Behaviors Among Emerging Adults.” 2015. Web. 24 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Braun T. Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Differentially Predict Eating Behaviors Among Emerging Adults. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Connecticut; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 24]. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/792.

Council of Science Editors:

Braun T. Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Differentially Predict Eating Behaviors Among Emerging Adults. [Masters Thesis]. University of Connecticut; 2015. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/792


University of Connecticut

2. Burnham, Kaylee. HIV-related Stigma and Health among People Living with HIV in Middle Georgia: Examining the Roles of Stress and Coping.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, University of Connecticut

Objective – HIV-related stigma and discrimination are drivers of health disparities among people living with HIV (PLWH). The U.S. South bears much of the burden of the domestic HIV epidemic. This study seeks to explore the dynamic effects of HIV-related stigma on health outcomes in a population of PLWH in middle Georgia. Experiences of enacted HIV stigma in the past year were assessed and participants indicated how stressful these events were and how they coped with the most impactful event. The primary study aim tested a moderated serial mediation model of HIV stigma on health in this population. Method – A total of 199 people living with HIV completed surveys via audio computer-assisted self-interviews (ACASI) while they attended their regular clinic appointment at a Ryan White clinic located in Macon, GA. Measures included demographics, health information, experiences of enacted stigma in the past year, stress and coping with the most impactful enacted stigma event. Medical information (viral load, CD4 count, clinic attendance, and medications) was abstracted from patient charts for a period of 6 months prior to their survey date. Results – A total of 96 individuals endorsed experiencing enacted stigma in the past year, and the sample endorsed moderate levels of internalized HIV stigma. Individuals who endorsed enacted stigma tended to have more negative psychosocial and mental health outcomes. Internalized stigma related to stress indexed on the most salient event of enacted stigma in the past year as well as maladaptive coping strategies used to cope with discriminatory experiences. There was not evidence in multivariate analyses that stress or maladaptive coping mediated effects of internalized stigma on medication adherence. There was also not a moderating effect of adaptive coping strategies on medication adherence in this sample. Conclusion – HIV stigma appears to have short-term effects on mental health, which could lead to long-term effects on physical health. Longitudinal investigations are indicated to uncover the mediating and attenuating mechanisms of HIV stigma on health. Stigma should be addressed in the context of health promotion interventions for PLWH given its implications on mental health and wellbeing. Advisors/Committee Members: Dean Cruess, PhD, Seth Kalichman, PhD, Amy Gorin, PhD.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burnham, K. (2017). HIV-related Stigma and Health among People Living with HIV in Middle Georgia: Examining the Roles of Stress and Coping. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Connecticut. Retrieved from https://opencommons.uconn.edu/dissertations/1497

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burnham, Kaylee. “HIV-related Stigma and Health among People Living with HIV in Middle Georgia: Examining the Roles of Stress and Coping.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Connecticut. Accessed April 24, 2019. https://opencommons.uconn.edu/dissertations/1497.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burnham, Kaylee. “HIV-related Stigma and Health among People Living with HIV in Middle Georgia: Examining the Roles of Stress and Coping.” 2017. Web. 24 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Burnham K. HIV-related Stigma and Health among People Living with HIV in Middle Georgia: Examining the Roles of Stress and Coping. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Connecticut; 2017. [cited 2019 Apr 24]. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/dissertations/1497.

Council of Science Editors:

Burnham K. HIV-related Stigma and Health among People Living with HIV in Middle Georgia: Examining the Roles of Stress and Coping. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Connecticut; 2017. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/dissertations/1497


University of Connecticut

3. Strainge, Lauren. Psychosocial Correlates of Medication Adherence Among College-Aged Women.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2018, University of Connecticut

Emerging adulthood is a period of increasing independence commonly associated with declines in medication adherence. Daily medication is prescribed to college-aged women at disproportionate rates compared to their male peers, but little is know about potential risk factors for poor medication adherence among this population. This study sought to assess the prevalence of adherence problems among this emerging adult population, and to identify psychosocial variables associated with poor adherence. Participants completed a series of online questionnaires regarding medication use, adherence, and number of demographic and psychosocial variables, and regression analyses were used to identify associated risk factors. Results indicated that adherence problems were highly prevalent in our sample, and were associated with certain beliefs about medications, perceived barriers to adherence, psychological distress, social support, and global executive functioning. These findings suggest a unique constellation of risk factors for adherence problems among young women, which may help to inform future interventions. Advisors/Committee Members: Dean Cruess, PhD, Amy Gorin, PhD, Howard Tennen, PhD, Dean Cruess, PhD.

Subjects/Keywords: Adherence; emerging adulthood; women’s health; health behaviors

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Strainge, L. (2018). Psychosocial Correlates of Medication Adherence Among College-Aged Women. (Masters Thesis). University of Connecticut. Retrieved from https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1193

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Strainge, Lauren. “Psychosocial Correlates of Medication Adherence Among College-Aged Women.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Connecticut. Accessed April 24, 2019. https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1193.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Strainge, Lauren. “Psychosocial Correlates of Medication Adherence Among College-Aged Women.” 2018. Web. 24 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Strainge L. Psychosocial Correlates of Medication Adherence Among College-Aged Women. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Connecticut; 2018. [cited 2019 Apr 24]. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1193.

Council of Science Editors:

Strainge L. Psychosocial Correlates of Medication Adherence Among College-Aged Women. [Masters Thesis]. University of Connecticut; 2018. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1193

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