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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Robert Trager"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Lefevre-Gonzalez, Christina. Revising the Rulebook, Revamping an Industry: Objectivity and Professional Journalism in Transition in the Modern Media Ecology.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Colorado

Journalistic objectivity, a key journalism ethic in American newsrooms for much of the twentieth century, is a concept often taken for granted in journalism ethics. Despite its seemingly unimpeachable role in mainstream newsrooms, recent publications by media scholars and critics have interrogated the concept's continued applicability in today's more fluid, digitized media ecology. Little research, however, has clarified whether journalists continue to adhere to the objectivity standard in their work. Likewise, little research has investigated whether objectivity continues to be taught, or how educators address the concept in journalism ethics classrooms at the university level. By interviewing journalists based in the Washington, D.C. area, this research assesses whether the concept has ever been reified as a practice within newsrooms. Additionally, it explores how and why objectivity challenges the way journalists construct their dual identities as reporters and as citizens, and how the concept influences the way reporters manage the impressions they make in order to adhere to prescribed public expectations for press behavior. By interviewing university educators who specialize in teaching journalism ethics, this research explores how educators address the concept of objectivity to their students. It also explores alternative conceptualizations of the term by educators, particularly transparency, pragmatic objectivity, and the critical political-economist perspective. This research exposes an important construct for future journalism research: the modern media ecology, which is both horizontally and vertically fluid. The modern media ecology parallels the rise of a post-Fordist American society, signaling an epistemic shift in journalism away from a professionalized, objective model to a more subjective, "fair" reporting model. In essence, the waning of journalistic objectivity is only a symptom of much larger socio-economic changes underway in not only journalism, but in communication work as a whole. In response, journalism education at American universities is experiencing an epistemic shift of its own. This research ends with an exploration of how post-Fordist ideology has impacted journalism education at the University of Colorado, as the University seeks to build a new interdisciplinary college that better fits the new fluid media ecology. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert Trager, Stewart Hoover, Michael McDevitt, Peter Simonson, Elizabeth Skewes.

Subjects/Keywords: Digital Media; Journalism Education; Journalism Ethics; News Institutions; Objectivity; Professional Journalism; Journalism Studies; Mass Communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lefevre-Gonzalez, C. (2013). Revising the Rulebook, Revamping an Industry: Objectivity and Professional Journalism in Transition in the Modern Media Ecology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/14

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lefevre-Gonzalez, Christina. “Revising the Rulebook, Revamping an Industry: Objectivity and Professional Journalism in Transition in the Modern Media Ecology.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/14.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lefevre-Gonzalez, Christina. “Revising the Rulebook, Revamping an Industry: Objectivity and Professional Journalism in Transition in the Modern Media Ecology.” 2013. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Lefevre-Gonzalez C. Revising the Rulebook, Revamping an Industry: Objectivity and Professional Journalism in Transition in the Modern Media Ecology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/14.

Council of Science Editors:

Lefevre-Gonzalez C. Revising the Rulebook, Revamping an Industry: Objectivity and Professional Journalism in Transition in the Modern Media Ecology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/14


University of Colorado

2. Ring, Caitlin Elizabeth. Hate Speech in Social Media: An Exploration of the Problem and Its Proposed Solutions.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Colorado

Social media are rife with hate speech. A quick glance through the comments section of a racially charged YouTube video demonstrates how pervasive the problem is. Although most major social media companies such as Google, Facebook and Twitter have their own policies regarding whether and what kinds of hate speech are permitted on their sites, the policies are often inconsistently applied and can be difficult for users to understand. Many of the decisions made by the content removal teams at these organizations are not nearly as speech protective as the First Amendment and U.S. Supreme Court precedent on the subject would mandate. Thus, the current situation gives social media companies’ unprecedented power to control what videos, text, images, etc. users may or may not post or access on those social media sites. In an effort to identify solutions for curtailing hate speech in social media, this dissertation will explore the scope and nature of the problem of hate speech in social media today, using YouTube as an exemplar. A review of arguments for and against regulating hate speech online is then presented, along with an overview of current U.S. hate speech and Internet regulations and relevant jurisprudence. The approaches proposed by other legal and communication scholars about whether and how to limit hate speech online are examined and evaluated. Finally, a solution that seeks to minimize hate speech on social media Web sites, while still respecting the protections established by the First Amendment, is proposed. Specifically, a recommendation is made to encourage self-regulation on the part of social media companies, which involves a move from a “.com” generic top-level domain to one called “.social.” In order to be part of the consortium of companies included on the “.social” domain, which will hopefully include YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and others, an organization must abide by the industry-developed, uniform rules regarding what kinds of hate speech content are and are not permitted on these sites. A working group comprised of social media decision-makers will develop the policy and staff members of the Federal Communications Commission will facilitate this process. Hopefully, the resulting approach will better reflect precedent on the issue, which hesitates to place any restrictions on expression, regardless of how offensive it may be. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert Trager, Andrew Calabrese, Shu-Ling Berggreen, Robert Nagel, Peter Simonson.

Subjects/Keywords: Hate speech; Internet; Media Law; Social Media; YouTube; Communication; Law; Mass Communication; Social Media

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ring, C. E. (2013). Hate Speech in Social Media: An Exploration of the Problem and Its Proposed Solutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/15

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ring, Caitlin Elizabeth. “Hate Speech in Social Media: An Exploration of the Problem and Its Proposed Solutions.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/15.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ring, Caitlin Elizabeth. “Hate Speech in Social Media: An Exploration of the Problem and Its Proposed Solutions.” 2013. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Ring CE. Hate Speech in Social Media: An Exploration of the Problem and Its Proposed Solutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/15.

Council of Science Editors:

Ring CE. Hate Speech in Social Media: An Exploration of the Problem and Its Proposed Solutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/15


University of Colorado

3. Red, Magdelana. Re-Interpreting Mexican Rock Music: Contemporary Youth, Politics, and the Mexican State.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Colorado

This dissertation elaborates a theoretical intervention challenging accepted interpretations of the role of rock music in youth political expression and identity formation during the period following the Mexican government’s apertura, or opening, from the 1980s through the 2000s, a period that followed decades of censorship and tight government control of youth expression, popular culture, and national identity. In spite of the fact that youth under the age of twenty-four make up approximately forty-five percent of Mexico’s population, young people and their engagement with and creation of popular culture have been severely understudied. This dissertation argues that while previous research has brought attention to a population that deserves to be studied, much of it has employed theoretical lenses that take too much for granted: perceiving the use and meaning of rock music to young people as inherently resistant, defiant, oppositional, and confrontational; and understanding rock’s fans as a discrete, identifiable, unified, and subordinate social group that is necessarily in conflict with an equally identifiable dominant group. This dissertation employs an interpretive approach to the study of Mexican rock music that strips away assumptions that organize analysis into predictable frameworks. Instead, following recent global media studies scholarship, select popular music studies scholars, and anthropologist Clifford Geertz, this project places data gathered from informants via interviews, observation, and documentary analysis into broader webs of significance and views human behavior as symbolic action. This research has revealed that rock music’s role in youth politics has been widely varied over the past thirty years – occasionally raising consciousness and prescribing avenues for social change, but more frequently (though equally important) providing a means of escape and disconnect from Mexico’s increasingly violent and hostile social world. This work is significant as a critical, diachronic account of an important, mediated popular cultural form that is examined contextually, relationally, and while considering audiences, texts, and production in analysis. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert Trager, Shu-Ling Berggreen, Robert Buffington, Isaac Reed, Nabil Echchaibi.

Subjects/Keywords: popular music; media; latino; rebellion; escape; Communication; Critical and Cultural Studies; Latin American Studies; Music

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Red, M. (2012). Re-Interpreting Mexican Rock Music: Contemporary Youth, Politics, and the Mexican State. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/23

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Red, Magdelana. “Re-Interpreting Mexican Rock Music: Contemporary Youth, Politics, and the Mexican State.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/23.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Red, Magdelana. “Re-Interpreting Mexican Rock Music: Contemporary Youth, Politics, and the Mexican State.” 2012. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Red M. Re-Interpreting Mexican Rock Music: Contemporary Youth, Politics, and the Mexican State. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/23.

Council of Science Editors:

Red M. Re-Interpreting Mexican Rock Music: Contemporary Youth, Politics, and the Mexican State. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2012. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/23

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