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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Rimgaila Salys"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Kleiner, Rose. Kantian Zombies in Modernity's Graveyard: Benjaminian Allegory and the Critique of Enlightenment in Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky.

Degree: MA, 2014, University of Colorado

Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky (1887-1950) is known for his dense, surreal fiction that engages extensively with philosophical figures and concepts. His literary method of experimental realism brings abstract ideas to concrete life, exploring conceptual frameworks in fantastic allegory. This theoretically rich and historically oriented method resonates strikingly with Walter Benjamin's analysis of allegory in his Trauerspiel; reading them together, we can gain a clearer sense of Krzhizhanovsky's critical dimensions. This project narrows in specifically on the use of allegory in his interactions with the works of Immanuel Kant, often made to stand in for the Enlightenment project broadly conceived. Taking up three stories that illustrate the breadth of his engagement with Kant, this project closely reads the connections Krzhizhanovsky draws between the Kantian worldview and the catastrophic violence of the twentieth century. In reading his allegorical interactions with Kant through a Benjaminian lens, we see that Krzhizhanovsky is centrally concerned with the violent potential at the heart of the intellectual foundations of modernity. Tracing the decay of reason and Kantian subjectivity, Krzhizhanovsky presents the Enlightenment impulse as akin to a ruinous disease transforming humanity into a society of zombies. Advisors/Committee Members: Mark Leiderman, Rimgaila Salys, Helmut Muller-Sievers.

Subjects/Keywords: surreal fiction; Trauerspiel; Kant; Enlightment; twentieth century; zombies; Comparative Literature; Slavic Languages and Societies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kleiner, R. (2014). Kantian Zombies in Modernity's Graveyard: Benjaminian Allegory and the Critique of Enlightenment in Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky. (Masters Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/16

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kleiner, Rose. “Kantian Zombies in Modernity's Graveyard: Benjaminian Allegory and the Critique of Enlightenment in Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/16.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kleiner, Rose. “Kantian Zombies in Modernity's Graveyard: Benjaminian Allegory and the Critique of Enlightenment in Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky.” 2014. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Kleiner R. Kantian Zombies in Modernity's Graveyard: Benjaminian Allegory and the Critique of Enlightenment in Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Colorado; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/16.

Council of Science Editors:

Kleiner R. Kantian Zombies in Modernity's Graveyard: Benjaminian Allegory and the Critique of Enlightenment in Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky. [Masters Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2014. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/16


University of Colorado

2. Vicks, Meghan Christine. Narratives of Nothing in Twentieth-Century Literature.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Colorado

This study begins with the observation that much of twentieth-century art, literature, and philosophy exhibits a concern with nothing itself. Both Martin Heidegger and Jean Paul Sartre, for example, perceive that nothing is part-and-parcel of (man’s) being. The present study adopts a similar position concerning nothing and its essential relationship to being, but adds a third element: that of writing narrative. This relationship between nothing and narrative is, I argue, established in the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche, Mikhail Bakhtin, Jacques Derrida, and Julia Kristeva. As Heidegger and Sartre position nothing as essential to the creation of being, so Nietzsche, Bakhtin, Derrida, and Kristeva figure nothing as essential to the production of narrative. The parallels between their theories regarding nothing and being, and nothing and narrative, are particularly telling, especially as the twentieth century deconstructs our notions of reality and fiction, rendering these increasingly indistinguishable from one another. This thesis regarding nothing’s relationship to narrative is further developed through analysis of the literary works of Nikolai Gogol, Herman Melville, Vladimir Nabokov, Samuel Beckett, and Victor Pelevin. These authors compose literature that not only gives narrative form to nothing itself (narratives about nothing), but that also envisions nothing as a generator of narrative (narratives of nothing). My phrase narratives of nothing indicates the symbiotic relationship between nothing and writing, wherein nothing resides at the forever-deferring center of a semiotic system that produces writing, narrative fiction, and thus “reality” as we know it. In each of the texts I have selected, there is a clear relationship established between (1) the act of writing, producing narrative and/or meaning, and (2) nothing or one of its many signifiers (e.g. void, cipher, zero, etc.). My analysis ultimately refigures the transcendental signified as nothing itself. Nothing as the transcendental signified is therefore the ever-deferring generator of a system of signifiers that perpetually recreate their own original transcendental signified. Because of this, nothing as the transcendental signified is an infinite nothing that constantly transforms depending on its own signifiers’ significations. Advisors/Committee Members: Mark Leiderman, Jeremy Green, Rimgaila Salys, Davide Stimilli, Eric White.

Subjects/Keywords: Being; reality; writing; zero; Samuel Beckett; Victor Pelevin; Vladimir Nabokov; Modern Literature; Psychology; Russian Literature; Theory and Philosophy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vicks, M. C. (2011). Narratives of Nothing in Twentieth-Century Literature. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/20

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vicks, Meghan Christine. “Narratives of Nothing in Twentieth-Century Literature.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/20.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vicks, Meghan Christine. “Narratives of Nothing in Twentieth-Century Literature.” 2011. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Vicks MC. Narratives of Nothing in Twentieth-Century Literature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2011. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/20.

Council of Science Editors:

Vicks MC. Narratives of Nothing in Twentieth-Century Literature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2011. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/coml_gradetds/20

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