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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Paul Voakes"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Cornell, Mary E. Who Really Controls the Message of Presidential Debates?.

Degree: MA, 2013, University of Colorado

Presidential debates have played an important role in the American campaign process but it has been debated on whether or not the message is more controlled by the media or the candidate. Response type, level of criticism and measure of evasiveness are the variables used in this research in hopes of gaining a better understanding of the debate message. Advisors/Committee Members: Elizabeth Skewes, Paul Voakes, Jan Whitt.

Subjects/Keywords: Agenda Setting; Control; Media; Presidential Debates; campaign politics; american politics; American Politics; Social Influence and Political Communication

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APA (6th Edition):

Cornell, M. E. (2013). Who Really Controls the Message of Presidential Debates?. (Masters Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/16

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cornell, Mary E. “Who Really Controls the Message of Presidential Debates?.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/16.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cornell, Mary E. “Who Really Controls the Message of Presidential Debates?.” 2013. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Cornell ME. Who Really Controls the Message of Presidential Debates?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/16.

Council of Science Editors:

Cornell ME. Who Really Controls the Message of Presidential Debates?. [Masters Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/jour_gradetds/16


University of Colorado

2. Schaefer, Daniel John. Crowdsourcing as Bricolage: A qualitative study of journalists enlisting and using crowdsourcing in social media.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2013, University of Colorado

The borderline between professionals and crowds of amateurs is blurring with crowdsourcing. In 2006, Howe observed the phenomenon of professionals outsourcing work to crowds of amateurs online. In the time since that observation, researchers have enthusiastically researched crowdsourcing as outsourcing. However, the wide adoption and increased interactivity offered by social media has further blurred this borderline for professionals and amateurs. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews with professional journalists to explore their accounts of the process of enlisting and using their audience to produce news reports. This data set provided a perspective to generate a more comprehensive theory of crowdsourcing and a better understanding of this blurring borderline that embraces the complexity of this communication phenomenon. This research study examined crowdsourcing in social media and discovered an important alternative view of crowdsourcing as organizing. Advisors/Committee Members: Michele H. Jackson, Timothy Kuhn, Paul Voakes, Kathleen Ryan, Bryan Taylor.

Subjects/Keywords: amateur; bricolage; crowdsourcing; journalism; professional; social media; Communication; Journalism Studies; Social Media

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schaefer, D. J. (2013). Crowdsourcing as Bricolage: A qualitative study of journalists enlisting and using crowdsourcing in social media. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/39

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schaefer, Daniel John. “Crowdsourcing as Bricolage: A qualitative study of journalists enlisting and using crowdsourcing in social media.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/39.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schaefer, Daniel John. “Crowdsourcing as Bricolage: A qualitative study of journalists enlisting and using crowdsourcing in social media.” 2013. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Schaefer DJ. Crowdsourcing as Bricolage: A qualitative study of journalists enlisting and using crowdsourcing in social media. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/39.

Council of Science Editors:

Schaefer DJ. Crowdsourcing as Bricolage: A qualitative study of journalists enlisting and using crowdsourcing in social media. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/39


University of Colorado

3. Rollins, Tyler Russell. Domestic Surveillance in the United States: World War II to Vietnam.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2016, University of Colorado

This dissertation examines archival documents as well as Congressional committee investigations and records to understand the scope and legality of domestic surveillance in the mid-twentieth century. Additionally, it works to understand how the intelligence agencies that carried out such surveillance were able to avoid meaningful punishment, even though their actions were often illegal. There has been a recent revival of concerns over the abilities of secret intelligence agencies to intercept and examine the communications of U.S. citizens. While the current revelations about domestic surveillance are certainly disconcerting, the reality is that domestic surveillance has a long and sordid history in the United States. With the advent and adoption of new technologies for communication, government access to the words and ideas of citizens proliferated in the twentieth century. This meant that surveillance could be carried out more broadly and efficiently than ever before. Such surveillance captured the communications of politicians, activists, workers, students, parents, teachers, Martin Luther King, Jr., and even Supreme Court Justices. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, it seeks to understand how such surveillance impacts civil liberties, with special attention paid to First Amendment protections of speech, the press, and association, and Fourth Amendment protections against unwarranted search and seizure. This work finds that government surveillance has the consequences of chilling speech and stifling intellectual privacy. This study examines National Security Agency operations SHAMROCK and MINARET; Federal Bureau of Investigation Counterintelligence Program (COINTELPRO) operations Communist Party USA, Socialist Workers Party, Black Nationalist Hate Groups, and New Left; and Central Intelligence Agency operations HTLINGUAL, CHAOS, MERRIMAC, and RESISTANCE. The examination of these operations concludes that the NSA, FBI, and CIA fundamentally violated the constitutional rights of countless citizens and these violations were carried out knowingly and repeatedly. The second aim of this dissertation is to investigate how these agencies were able to avoid meaningful punishment. To understand how they skirted punishment, it is necessary to think of the United States as a dual state. The dual state theory was developed in the 1930s by German legal scholar and political scientist Ernst Fraenkel. Fraenkel sought to understand the political, economic and legal changes taking place in Germany under the Third Reich. His theory suggests that in a dual state, there is Normative State, which is charged with enforcing normative laws such as contract and traffic law, and there is a Prerogative State, which arbitrarily applies laws to groups and individuals determined to be acting “politically” or in ways that threaten the current regime—in Germany, the Prerogative State was synonymous with the Gestapo. In much the same way, members of the American Prerogative State arbitrarily… Advisors/Committee Members: Janice Peck, Andrew Calabrese, Paul Voakes, Kelty Logan, Peter Simonson.

Subjects/Keywords: chilling effect; dual state; first amendment; fourth amendment; social movements; surveillance; Communication; Law; United States History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rollins, T. R. (2016). Domestic Surveillance in the United States: World War II to Vietnam. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/cmci_gradetds/5

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rollins, Tyler Russell. “Domestic Surveillance in the United States: World War II to Vietnam.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/cmci_gradetds/5.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rollins, Tyler Russell. “Domestic Surveillance in the United States: World War II to Vietnam.” 2016. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Rollins TR. Domestic Surveillance in the United States: World War II to Vietnam. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/cmci_gradetds/5.

Council of Science Editors:

Rollins TR. Domestic Surveillance in the United States: World War II to Vietnam. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2016. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/cmci_gradetds/5

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