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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Patti Adler"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Ellis, Colter. Breeding Inequality: Human-Animal Relationships in Beef Production.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2011, University of Colorado

This dissertation is about the human-animal relationship in beef production. In particular, I examine the social-psychological context of working with an animal intended to become a commodity. I show that beef producers care greatly for the animals they raise, but this relationship has limits. To learn these limits, young people must acquire the emotional skills needed to understand certain kinds of animals as "market animals." These emotional skills help young people to understand animals as killable and useable as commodities. The task is to be able to have caring relationships with market animals, while remaining capable of treating them as commodities. Adult ranchers use these same skills to create and maintain an emotional boundary between consumers and the animals they eat. This is what I call boundary labor. Ranchers take on the emotional burden of caring for an animal who is useful to others only because its body is killable. Using these bodies as commodities necessitates the continual breeding of more bodies. This process collapses biological reproduction with capitalist production. I use the term "(re)production" to signify the inseparability of these two factors. Through the social-psychological processes outlined, producers learn to understand their relationship with cattle as symbiotic. I call this process the symbiotic ideology. Advisors/Committee Members: Leslie Irvine, Patti Adler, Amy Wilkins.

Subjects/Keywords: Animal Agriculture; Animals & Society; Beef Production; Cattle Ranching; Ethnography; Social Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Ellis, C. (2011). Breeding Inequality: Human-Animal Relationships in Beef Production. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/12

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ellis, Colter. “Breeding Inequality: Human-Animal Relationships in Beef Production.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/12.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ellis, Colter. “Breeding Inequality: Human-Animal Relationships in Beef Production.” 2011. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Ellis C. Breeding Inequality: Human-Animal Relationships in Beef Production. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2011. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/12.

Council of Science Editors:

Ellis C. Breeding Inequality: Human-Animal Relationships in Beef Production. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2011. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/12


University of Colorado

2. Kahl, Kristina Noelani. The Crisis of Social Change for Simple Livers: How a Faith-Based Organization and its Members Affect the Voluntary Simplicity Movement.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2013, University of Colorado

This research examines how a faith-based simple living organization and its members, Simple Livers, navigate and give meaning to the idea of living a simple lifestyle within the context of their religious faith. Analyzing data from four years of participant observation, interviews, and textual analysis of organizational documents and drawing from symbolic interaction and social movement literature, especially the literature on lifestyle movements, I describe the ways Simple Livers produce and negotiate individual and organizational identities situated within systems of religion, race, class, gender and emotions. I examine the interplay of emotions with Christian and voluntary simplicity ideologies, which creates an over-conforming moral self, a distinctive identity that is rooted in the belief that a Simple Liver should be more moral than the general population. I also discuss participants’ boundary work and describe an intragroup boundary crisis, a situation that occurs when groups cannot create or maintain an organizational identity because of conflicting inclusive and exclusive boundaries at the individual level. Advisors/Committee Members: Leslie Irvine, Stefanie Mollborn, Janet Jacobs, Ross Haenfler, Patti Adler.

Subjects/Keywords: lifestyle movement; social movement; organization identity; Sociology

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APA (6th Edition):

Kahl, K. N. (2013). The Crisis of Social Change for Simple Livers: How a Faith-Based Organization and its Members Affect the Voluntary Simplicity Movement. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/29

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kahl, Kristina Noelani. “The Crisis of Social Change for Simple Livers: How a Faith-Based Organization and its Members Affect the Voluntary Simplicity Movement.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/29.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kahl, Kristina Noelani. “The Crisis of Social Change for Simple Livers: How a Faith-Based Organization and its Members Affect the Voluntary Simplicity Movement.” 2013. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Kahl KN. The Crisis of Social Change for Simple Livers: How a Faith-Based Organization and its Members Affect the Voluntary Simplicity Movement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/29.

Council of Science Editors:

Kahl KN. The Crisis of Social Change for Simple Livers: How a Faith-Based Organization and its Members Affect the Voluntary Simplicity Movement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/29


University of Colorado

3. Hackett, Colleen Marie. 'Helping Women Help Themselves': An Ethnography of Carceral Empowerment and the Neoliberal Rehabilitative Ideal at a Recovery Center for Criminalized Women.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2015, University of Colorado

Although the recent criminological literature has introduced rich, critical analyses of the incarceration boom in the United States, certain issues, such as the criminalization of women, have been historically ignored. This dissertation fills that gap by blending an analysis of gendered, raced, and classed inequalities with crime control systems, shedding light on the disparate effects on marginalized women. Additionally, my work contributes to the scholarship on the net-widening effect of the carceral state. As the U.S. shifts its policies towards decriminalization and decarceration in instances of minor nonviolent drug offenses, controlling crime becomes a task that is fulfilled by community-based agencies, such as non-profit organizations. My research is concerned with noncriminal processing sites of carcerality, such as mandated rehabilitation programs, to analyze the raced, classed, and gendered ways in which neoliberal punitive logics discursively map on to therapy narratives and practices. My dissertation is a critical feminist ethnography of a rehabilitation program for criminalized women. I use participant-observation, in-depth interviews, and focus group data to weave together a multi-layered Foucauldian analysis that explores how care workers and program clients use therapeutic narratives in gendered ways to construct and contest model neoliberal citizenship. I find that modern therapeutics discursively centers meritocratic notions of “choice” and “self-empowerment,” which consequently governs marginality on the basis of race, class, gender, and ability. I analyze the ways that care workers strategically use an “alternative” organizational identity to skirt the realities of the center’s low success rates. In their attempts to deliver rehabilitative programming, care workers interpret clients’ material failures as evidence of underlying emotional problems. I also analyze the voices of criminalized women to demonstrate how they replicate, accommodate, and/or refute meta-narratives from claimsmakers. I find that, although criminalized women understand their collective disempowerment, they feel unable to challenge structural constraints because of the web of exclusionary policies that produces social precarity. My dissertation contributes to the literature on the culture of punishment by illustrating the interdependency between rehabilitation and punishment practices in a neoliberal society. I argue that community-based rehabilitation centers risk perpetuating the exclusionary and punitive approaches espoused by the criminal processing system. Advisors/Committee Members: Amy Wilkins, Leslie Irvine, Christina Sue, Patti Adler, Allison McKim.

Subjects/Keywords: carceral studies; critical ethnography; critical prison studies; punishment; reentry; rehabilitation; Criminology; Gender and Sexuality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hackett, C. M. (2015). 'Helping Women Help Themselves': An Ethnography of Carceral Empowerment and the Neoliberal Rehabilitative Ideal at a Recovery Center for Criminalized Women. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/45

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hackett, Colleen Marie. “'Helping Women Help Themselves': An Ethnography of Carceral Empowerment and the Neoliberal Rehabilitative Ideal at a Recovery Center for Criminalized Women.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/45.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hackett, Colleen Marie. “'Helping Women Help Themselves': An Ethnography of Carceral Empowerment and the Neoliberal Rehabilitative Ideal at a Recovery Center for Criminalized Women.” 2015. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Hackett CM. 'Helping Women Help Themselves': An Ethnography of Carceral Empowerment and the Neoliberal Rehabilitative Ideal at a Recovery Center for Criminalized Women. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/45.

Council of Science Editors:

Hackett CM. 'Helping Women Help Themselves': An Ethnography of Carceral Empowerment and the Neoliberal Rehabilitative Ideal at a Recovery Center for Criminalized Women. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2015. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/socy_gradetds/45

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