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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Jillian Porter"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Baca, Alicia. Unmasked and Unhindered: the Evolution of the Affect Generator in the Works of Pussy Riot.

Degree: MA, 2018, University of Colorado

This thesis provides an analysis of the evolution of Russian punk rock performance art group Pussy Riot's works from "Punk Prayer" and the recently released "Make America Great Again" and asks how the change in the group's physical appearance has affected their protest art. The most notable article of their performance costumes, the balaclava mask, acted as an affect generator that incited reactions from their audience. Now that the balaclava is no longer the primary affect generator for the band, the performer’s body has now taken over that role within their recent works. While their original intent was not to show off the member's bodies, the body is now being used as the primary tool to communicate the group’s ideals. By using the body as an affect generator Pussy Riot has lifted both a physical and metaphorical mask and has allowed them to expand their performances and protest messages. Advisors/Committee Members: Laura Osterman, Jillian Porter, Mark Leiderman.

Subjects/Keywords: feminism; protest art; punk rock music; pussy riot; russia; women’s studies; Arts and Humanities; Performance Studies; Slavic Languages and Societies

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APA (6th Edition):

Baca, A. (2018). Unmasked and Unhindered: the Evolution of the Affect Generator in the Works of Pussy Riot. (Masters Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/35

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baca, Alicia. “Unmasked and Unhindered: the Evolution of the Affect Generator in the Works of Pussy Riot.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed March 20, 2019. https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/35.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baca, Alicia. “Unmasked and Unhindered: the Evolution of the Affect Generator in the Works of Pussy Riot.” 2018. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Baca A. Unmasked and Unhindered: the Evolution of the Affect Generator in the Works of Pussy Riot. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/35.

Council of Science Editors:

Baca A. Unmasked and Unhindered: the Evolution of the Affect Generator in the Works of Pussy Riot. [Masters Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/35


University of Colorado

2. Miller, Christian. Nature’s Influence on Narrative in Chekhov’s Fiction.

Degree: MA, 2018, University of Colorado

Abstract: The recent boom in ecological criticism invites reconsideration of the role nature plays in the works of Anton Chekhov. Drawing on existing accounts of nature in Chekhov’s fiction as well as in Russian literature and culture more broadly, this thesis reveals a crucial and previously unrecognized affinity between five of Chekhov’s most celebrated stories: “The Kiss” («Поцелуй», 1887), “Fortune” («Счастье», 1887), “Gusev” («Гусев», 1890), “The Man in the Case” («Человек в футляре», 1898), and “The Lady with the Little Dog” («Дама с собачкой», 1898). In each of these otherwise unrelated stories, nature complicates the characters and the stories they tell themselves and one another. In some cases, nature gives the characters new insights and helps them to evolve. In others it gives readers a new understanding that the characters themselves do not share. In all cases nature in Chekhov’s works opens a broader perspective, dwarfing the characters and their existential anxieties by the immensity of land, water, or cosmos. Ultimately, Chekhov presents myriad ways in which nature frames and exceeds human experience, incites and resists narrativization. Advisors/Committee Members: Jillian Porter, Laura Osterman, Mark Leiderman.

Subjects/Keywords: chekhov; fiction; literature; narrative; nature; russian; Russian Literature; Slavic Languages and Societies

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APA (6th Edition):

Miller, C. (2018). Nature’s Influence on Narrative in Chekhov’s Fiction. (Masters Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/28

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Christian. “Nature’s Influence on Narrative in Chekhov’s Fiction.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed March 20, 2019. https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/28.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Christian. “Nature’s Influence on Narrative in Chekhov’s Fiction.” 2018. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Miller C. Nature’s Influence on Narrative in Chekhov’s Fiction. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/28.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller C. Nature’s Influence on Narrative in Chekhov’s Fiction. [Masters Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/28


University of Colorado

3. Pak, Yekaterina. The Grotesque in Tatyana Tolstaya’s the Slynx.

Degree: MA, 2018, University of Colorado

The following paper examines several different manifestations of the grotesque in Tatyana Tolstaya’s novel <i>The Slynx.</i> Tolstaya experiments with the grotesque in several realms, by setting the town Fyodor Kuzmichsk with mutated people, creating for them a peculiar language and wrapping the whole story into an original style of narration which embodies divergent discourses. The grotesque can be flexibly defined and applied to a variety of aspects of a literary text. The thesis discusses the most traditional one, related to distortions of the human body, but also explores how the grotesque manifests itself through postmodern language and narration. In particular, since the narration is dominated by postmodern language and a polyphony of discourses, <i>The Slynx</i> signifies a break with the previous forms of the grotesque. In comparison with Romantic and Realist grotesques, a contrast with the norm no longer defines the grotesque; instead, unbound to the past, the postmodern grotesque exists within the absence of any norm. Advisors/Committee Members: Laura Osterman, Mark Leiderman, Jillian Porter.

Subjects/Keywords: grotesque; manifestations; literature; historic; story; Russian Literature; Slavic Languages and Societies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pak, Y. (2018). The Grotesque in Tatyana Tolstaya’s the Slynx. (Masters Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/30

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pak, Yekaterina. “The Grotesque in Tatyana Tolstaya’s the Slynx.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed March 20, 2019. https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/30.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pak, Yekaterina. “The Grotesque in Tatyana Tolstaya’s the Slynx.” 2018. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Pak Y. The Grotesque in Tatyana Tolstaya’s the Slynx. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/30.

Council of Science Editors:

Pak Y. The Grotesque in Tatyana Tolstaya’s the Slynx. [Masters Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/gsll_gradetds/30

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