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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Janette K. Klingner"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Annamma, Subini Ancy. Resistance and Resilience: The Education Trajectories of Young Women of Color with Disabilities through the School to Prison Pipeline.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2013, University of Colorado

Too often, students from communities of color experience the school system where they are routed from the doors of a schoolhouse to the doors of a prison; this phenomenon is known as the School to Prison Pipeline. In this dissertation, I explored how identity markers (e.g. race, gender, and disability) were related to education and incarceration through qualitative analysis and Critical Race Theory (CRT). Research provided us with statistics about the Pipeline; however, there was still little known about the actual experiences of students. Therefore, this study focused on the trajectories of young women of color with disabilities through the Pipeline. Using a combination of identity mapping, interviews, and observations, I collaborated with females of color with emotional disabilities and their teachers to share what has constrained and enabled the success of these young women. Much of the literature suggested that special education was tied to the School to Prison Pipeline and that females of color with disabilities had unique experiences. This study utilized historically marginalized students as knowledge generators to address the School to Prison Pipeline in an empirically based fashion in order to determine what those experiences are and what we can learn in order to shut off the Pipeline. To capture the trajectories of the young women of color with disabilities, results are organized according to respective points in the School to Prison Pipeline: Public Schools->Juvenile Justice Schooling->The Future. The themes throughout the dissertation were: the educational institutions throughout the Pipeline punished girls for their behaviors without considering the sociocultural context of their lives, the girls’ identities were erased within the content and the only identity girls were encouraged to embrace was criminal. Though the girls had faced difficult situations outside of school, instead of responding with care or concern, these themes intertwined to propel the girls through the School to Prison Pipeline. Finally, the finding suggest that unless teachers’ are trained to utilize a sociocultural view of learning, ability, and culture that is implemented through critical pedagogy, girls who face difficult situations outside of school will continue to be pushed into the School to Prison Pipeline. Advisors/Committee Members: Janette K. Klingner, David Connor, Elizabeth Dutro, Kris Gutiérrez, Reiland Rabaka.

Subjects/Keywords: Disability; Gender; Race; marginalized students; Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education; Special Education and Teaching

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Annamma, S. A. (2013). Resistance and Resilience: The Education Trajectories of Young Women of Color with Disabilities through the School to Prison Pipeline. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/33

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Annamma, Subini Ancy. “Resistance and Resilience: The Education Trajectories of Young Women of Color with Disabilities through the School to Prison Pipeline.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/33.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Annamma, Subini Ancy. “Resistance and Resilience: The Education Trajectories of Young Women of Color with Disabilities through the School to Prison Pipeline.” 2013. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Annamma SA. Resistance and Resilience: The Education Trajectories of Young Women of Color with Disabilities through the School to Prison Pipeline. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/33.

Council of Science Editors:

Annamma SA. Resistance and Resilience: The Education Trajectories of Young Women of Color with Disabilities through the School to Prison Pipeline. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/33


University of Colorado

2. Moore, Brooke Anne. Understanding the Ideology of Normal: Making Visible the Ways in Which Educators Think about Students who seem Different.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2013, University of Colorado

The conceptualization of normal in schools is problematic. It mediates perceptions about ability, achievement and behavior. Normal implies a hierarchy, naturalizing the idea that some students can achieve better than others. This practice places the blame on the student by locating the problem within the child while failing to consider ways to make educational contexts more responsive. Those seen as deviating from normal are often characterized by race, language use, socioeconomic status or perceived ability. Historically, this has led to educational inequities. Equating difference with deficits is problematic as US schools are growing in diversity daily. In this social design experiment, I combined Disability Studies in Education and Cultural Historical Activity Theory to examine: (1) how normal was conceptualized for my participants and within the contexts of their schools, and how this influenced their role as special educators; and (2) how to shift the meaning of normal to be more encompassing of diversity and what this means for the future of special education. My participants were graduate level, practicing teachers enrolled in EDUC 7105. Participants read critical literature, engaged in audio-recorded small group discussions, and wrote personal written reflections pertaining to how normal is conceptualized in the activity systems of their schools and to consider ways to expand the meaning of normal to be more encompassing of diversity. I then analyzed my data using qualitative, grounded theory methodology. Advisors/Committee Members: Janette K. Klingner, A. Susan Jurow, David J. Connor, Kris D. Gutiérrez, Robert T. Craig.

Subjects/Keywords: Disability Studies; Diversity; Equity; Disability and Equity in Education; Humane Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moore, B. A. (2013). Understanding the Ideology of Normal: Making Visible the Ways in Which Educators Think about Students who seem Different. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/engl_gradetds/48

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moore, Brooke Anne. “Understanding the Ideology of Normal: Making Visible the Ways in Which Educators Think about Students who seem Different.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/engl_gradetds/48.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moore, Brooke Anne. “Understanding the Ideology of Normal: Making Visible the Ways in Which Educators Think about Students who seem Different.” 2013. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Moore BA. Understanding the Ideology of Normal: Making Visible the Ways in Which Educators Think about Students who seem Different. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/engl_gradetds/48.

Council of Science Editors:

Moore BA. Understanding the Ideology of Normal: Making Visible the Ways in Which Educators Think about Students who seem Different. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/engl_gradetds/48


University of Colorado

3. Boele, Amy Lynn. Does it Say That? How Teacher Questions Mediate Dis/Ability in an Era When the Text and Test Have the Final Say.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2014, University of Colorado

Using sociocultural concepts of authoritative and dialogic discourse, I sought to answer the following questions: (1) How do classroom teachers' questioning practices during reading comprehension instruction differ between "low" and "average" groups, especially with respect to Accountable Talk questions (AT; Michaels, O'Connor, & Resnick, 2010) and Assertive Questions (AQ; Koshik, 2005) and with students with learning disabilities? And (2) In what ways do classroom teacher questioning practices during small group reading comprehension include AT and AQ? Qualitative observations, video and audio transcripts, and teacher interviews were used for my analysis of questions. In this study, I also examined quantitative differences in teachers' questions between the student groups by comparing frequencies of question types and by conducting significance tests. Findings show how teacher questioning practices can be imbued with tensions when questions are designed to transfer responsibility of thought to the students, as in Accountable Talk, but work to maintain the location of knowledge within the teacher, as in Assertive Questions. These tensions are situated within broader tensions of the activity, including the model of reading comprehension employed, teachers' conceptualizations of student dis/ability, and global problems within systems of accountability that have led to high-stakes systems of evaluation, what counts as learning, and whose knowledge is privileged. Advisors/Committee Members: Janette K. Klingner, Susan Hopewell, Alison G. Boardman, Kris D. Gutiérrez, Maria A. Ruiz-Primo.

Subjects/Keywords: classroom talk; dialogic discouse; elementary education; learning disabilities; reading comprehension; teacher questioning; Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research; Special Education and Teaching

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boele, A. L. (2014). Does it Say That? How Teacher Questions Mediate Dis/Ability in an Era When the Text and Test Have the Final Say. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/38

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boele, Amy Lynn. “Does it Say That? How Teacher Questions Mediate Dis/Ability in an Era When the Text and Test Have the Final Say.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/38.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boele, Amy Lynn. “Does it Say That? How Teacher Questions Mediate Dis/Ability in an Era When the Text and Test Have the Final Say.” 2014. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Boele AL. Does it Say That? How Teacher Questions Mediate Dis/Ability in an Era When the Text and Test Have the Final Say. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/38.

Council of Science Editors:

Boele AL. Does it Say That? How Teacher Questions Mediate Dis/Ability in an Era When the Text and Test Have the Final Say. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2014. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/38

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