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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Deborah Haynes"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Hawthorn, Rachel Susan. Making Worlds: Representing Experience in Romani Contemporary Art.

Degree: MA, Art & Art History, 2013, University of Colorado

The Roma have historically been represented in art and literature as nomads, free from the burdens of civilized society, and one with nature and the elements. From the sixteenth century gypsy child sketched by Leonardo da Vinci to the carefree life of artists living La Vie Bohème in nineteenth century Paris, the "Gypsy" existence is one of myth. This narrative imposed on the minority Roma by the majority European public has little to do with reality. The history of the European Romani community is one of expulsions, pogroms, violence, and genocide. Despite attempts to establish guidelines for human rights during the expansion of the European Union, the oppressive and racist treatment of the Romani continues to this day. While the history of art has enlisted the myth of the Gypsy in support of the idea of the modern, independent artist, the art world in practice has marginalized the Roma, labeling their creative work as folk art, outsider art, or kitsch. This thesis will look at three examples of public creative engagement of the Roma community: the Roma and Sinti memorial in Berlin, the First Roma Pavilion at the 2007 Venice Biennale, and the Reconsidering Roma exhibit in Berlin in 2011. Utilizing the structures of the international art world, the Roma artists involved with these events engaged the world community as a means of combating the prejudice experienced by many Roma today. Through activism, the international the art world, and contemporary art, Roma artists, as members of Europe's largest minority, engage the concepts of space, the nation-state, and boundaries in the formation of identity. The issues addressed in this thesis are key elements in the broader pursuit of security and identity of the European Roma community. Their experience is an ideal case study of the larger questions of post-unification European identity. Advisors/Committee Members: Deborah Haynes,, Kirk Ambrose, James Cordova.

Subjects/Keywords: Contemporary Art; European History; Identity; Roma; Romani; Subaltern; Contemporary Art; Ethnic Studies; European History; History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

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APA (6th Edition):

Hawthorn, R. S. (2013). Making Worlds: Representing Experience in Romani Contemporary Art. (Masters Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/arth_gradetds/17

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hawthorn, Rachel Susan. “Making Worlds: Representing Experience in Romani Contemporary Art.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed October 30, 2020. https://scholar.colorado.edu/arth_gradetds/17.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hawthorn, Rachel Susan. “Making Worlds: Representing Experience in Romani Contemporary Art.” 2013. Web. 30 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hawthorn RS. Making Worlds: Representing Experience in Romani Contemporary Art. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Colorado; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 30]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/arth_gradetds/17.

Council of Science Editors:

Hawthorn RS. Making Worlds: Representing Experience in Romani Contemporary Art. [Masters Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2013. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/arth_gradetds/17


University of Colorado

2. Treadwell, Kari. Family Masks.

Degree: MFA, Art & Art History, 2011, University of Colorado

Before there was theory and doctrine there was a story. Stories are an excellent avenue for captivating children of all ages and conveying a message. I grew up listening to stories about my family. As a child, I thought about them as trivial anecdotes. However, today I am more aware of their allegorical significance. Recently, I have been working with photographs from my grandmother's scrapbook, a photo album my mother and I put together, and my handmade masks. The portraits in these albums come alive when I look at them - I can hear my mother's, father's, and grandmother's voices telling me a story. I can visualize myself in almost every family portrait, the layers of my identity unraveling as I look at these images. Vernacular photography has been prevalent since the advent of the hand camera. The use of the camera coincides with our desire to record our memories, stories, and traditions: which in-turn become our histories. This process of collective discovery through individual reflection on the past is a form nostalgia, a longing to return home, a rhetorical home that exists in our minds and heart, one that we do not visit physically but rather mentally and spiritually. Therefore, cultural objects create our home by providing evidence to explain who we are. Advisors/Committee Members: Alex Sweetman, Melanie Walker, Deborah Haynes.

Subjects/Keywords: Art Practice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Treadwell, K. (2011). Family Masks. (Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/38

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Treadwell, Kari. “Family Masks.” 2011. Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed October 30, 2020. https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/38.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Treadwell, Kari. “Family Masks.” 2011. Web. 30 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Treadwell K. Family Masks. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 30]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/38.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Treadwell K. Family Masks. [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2011. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/38

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Colorado

3. Mitchell, Susanne. Ancestors and Relatives: A Visual Discourse on Race and Gender in the Post Colonial World.

Degree: MFA, Art & Art History, 2007, University of Colorado

My thesis is a series of mixed media paintings collectively entitled Ancestors and Relatives. This group of works questions the effects of colonizations, oppression, and ongoing racism, especially how the past informs the present complex relationship between blacks and whites and between third-world and first-world countries. Based on my own experience of creating a cross-continental, inter-racial family by marrying and African relatives at odds, fabric is used as a reminder of our shared humanity and the human connection. Figures are used to scrutinize gendered and racialized identities, while multiple layers of collage in the panels correspond to multiple layers of experience and meaning. Perceptions of color and power are human constructs like fabrics and houses, which endure and make negating the past impossible. Notions of "Whiteness" and "Blackness" require each other for their existence. This work is rooted in biography, politicized by history, and energized through personal encounter. Advisors/Committee Members: Clinton Cline, Deborah Haynes.

Subjects/Keywords: Art Practice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mitchell, S. (2007). Ancestors and Relatives: A Visual Discourse on Race and Gender in the Post Colonial World. (Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/16

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mitchell, Susanne. “Ancestors and Relatives: A Visual Discourse on Race and Gender in the Post Colonial World.” 2007. Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed October 30, 2020. https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/16.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mitchell, Susanne. “Ancestors and Relatives: A Visual Discourse on Race and Gender in the Post Colonial World.” 2007. Web. 30 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Mitchell S. Ancestors and Relatives: A Visual Discourse on Race and Gender in the Post Colonial World. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 30]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/16.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mitchell S. Ancestors and Relatives: A Visual Discourse on Race and Gender in the Post Colonial World. [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2007. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/16

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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