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You searched for +publisher:"University of Colorado" +contributor:("Daryl Maeda"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Sheflin, Douglas. Dust, Rain, and War: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains from 1929 to 1945.

Degree: PhD, Philosophy, 2012, University of Colorado

The dissertation argues that the New Deal conservation policy that took root during the 1930s played an important role in changing how farmers approached their land and their government during the 1930s and beyond. The severity of the depression and devastation wrought by the Dust Bowl forced agriculturalists to reconsider how they used the land because the crises exposed the fragility of the rural economy and the problems caused by farming submarginal lands. Many farmers utilized New Deal programs, agencies, and funding to practice conservation, mitigate the Great Depression, and rehabilitate their lands. The system of county agents proved vital to this process, as agents in rural counties helped locals navigate the complexities of an ever-expanding state, serving as interlocutors between federal experts and farmers. It shows that farmers acted pragmatically - participating in programs they found worthwhile, designing alternatives, and capitalizing on federal largesse. Indeed, local farmers helped build the New Deal conservation state through just such engagement. In the aftermath of the drought, altered circumstances did little to disrupt the new coziness between growers and their tax-payer funded benefactor. World War II actually cemented that relationship, when the government responded to Coloradans' requests for outside labor by importing Braceros and Jamaican workers, by using German prisoners of war, and by establishing work contracts for prisoners from the Amache Japanese American incarceration camp. This contract labor, which local farmers deemed necessary to augment a labor pool depleted by migration and relocation, boosted wartime production dramatically. In addition, the influx of cheap and readily available labor combined with improved weather to allow farmers to maximize production and capitalize on wartime prices, setting the stage for the development of agribusiness in postwar America. Advisors/Committee Members: Paul S. Sutter, Thomas Andrews, Phoebe Young, Ralph Mann, Daryl Maeda.

Subjects/Keywords: Agriculture; American West; Environmental History; Labor; New Deal; World War II; History

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APA (6th Edition):

Sheflin, D. (2012). Dust, Rain, and War: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains from 1929 to 1945. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/phil_gradetds/30

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sheflin, Douglas. “Dust, Rain, and War: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains from 1929 to 1945.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/phil_gradetds/30.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sheflin, Douglas. “Dust, Rain, and War: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains from 1929 to 1945.” 2012. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Sheflin D. Dust, Rain, and War: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains from 1929 to 1945. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/phil_gradetds/30.

Council of Science Editors:

Sheflin D. Dust, Rain, and War: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains from 1929 to 1945. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2012. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/phil_gradetds/30


University of Colorado

2. Drummond, Michelle Jane. Opening Pandora's Box: Exploring Educators' Conceptions of Culture and Multicultural Education.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2014, University of Colorado

This case study explores educators' conceptions of culture and multicultural education in four schools (three elementary and one middle), in a relatively large urban district in the state of New Mexico, where multicultural education policies have been in place and supported since the early 1970s. A great deal has been written regarding both effective pedagogical practices and the relationship between educators' beliefs about their students (racial biases, setting high expectations, etc.) and their students' academic success. However, understanding the forces that influence and shape local educators' conceptions of culture and multicultural education remains a relatively unexplored area. Because the purpose of multicultural education has always been to increase equity for students from non-dominant backgrounds or, in other words, those who are more likely to be negatively impacted by teacher bias and reductive notions of culture, this omission needed to be addressed. In order to study these influences, interviews with two focal teachers at each of four participating schools, the principals of all four schools, and district level administrators were used as the primary data source; however, there were observations, additional interviews, and two focus groups as data sources as well. The results of the analysis indicated that educators' conceptions of culture and multicultural education are most significantly influenced by personal experiences. Further, the data suggested that certain types of experiences related to the development of particular conceptions of culture and understandings of learning. In related analyses to explore whether these educators' conceptions were connected to their pedagogical practices in predictable ways, the data suggested that educators' chose and implemented multicultural education practices idiosyncratically. In other words, their reported practices were not necessarily consistent with their reported conceptions of culture and multicultural education. These findings may be particularly useful for teacher preparation and professional development programs as they illuminate potential entry points for helping prospective and current teachers develop more robust notions of culture and better understand its central role in learning processes. Based on the study results, I suggest that multicultural education programs, practices, and policies, could potentially be more effective if they were based on robust conceptions of culture and were more tightly aligned to expansive theories of learning such as sociocultural theory. Advisors/Committee Members: Kris D.Gutierrez, Susan Jurow, Kevin Welner, Ruben Donato, Daryl Maeda.

Subjects/Keywords: critical pedagogical practice; Culture; Multicultural Education; sociocultural learning theory; Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drummond, M. J. (2014). Opening Pandora's Box: Exploring Educators' Conceptions of Culture and Multicultural Education. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/43

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drummond, Michelle Jane. “Opening Pandora's Box: Exploring Educators' Conceptions of Culture and Multicultural Education.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/43.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drummond, Michelle Jane. “Opening Pandora's Box: Exploring Educators' Conceptions of Culture and Multicultural Education.” 2014. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Drummond MJ. Opening Pandora's Box: Exploring Educators' Conceptions of Culture and Multicultural Education. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/43.

Council of Science Editors:

Drummond MJ. Opening Pandora's Box: Exploring Educators' Conceptions of Culture and Multicultural Education. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2014. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/43


University of Colorado

3. Paguyo, Christina Hong. Enacting Diversity and Racial Projects on College Campuses: Tensions and Possibilities for Transforming Pedagogical Practices.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2014, University of Colorado

Racial, socioeconomic, and political segregation patterns currently surpass pre-1960s levels in America (Anderson, 2010). Higher education may be the first – and perhaps only – time students interact with diversity of ideas and people (Harper & Hurtado, 2011). My dissertation examined how universities mediated diversity initiatives where students learned about diversity and race while participating in seminars that fostered cross-racial interactions. Informed by a cultural historical approach to learning and development, I examined two case studies of one public and one private university. The following research questions guided my inquiry: (a) How do postsecondary educators (administrators, faculty, and volunteers) theorize issues of diversity and race? (b) How do postsecondary educators organize student learning about issues of diversity and race? (c) What are the affordances and constraints of how postsecondary educators organize student learning? and (d) How do racial attitudes of student participants shift from the beginning to the end of the seminars? Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory to address these questions, I analyzed three sources of data: audio recordings of interviews with postsecondary educators, video recordings of seminar interactions, and student responses to the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS; Neville, Lilly, Duran, Lee & Browne, 2000). My findings show how different kinds of pedagogical practices created or shut down entry points for students to engage with issues of diversity and race. By "re-purposing" tools from everyday life, postsecondary educators facilitated opportunities for students to make connections between personal experiences and abstract concepts. However, powerful modes of silencing, such as questioning practices and rules to ensure safety sometimes suppressed discussions. Subsequently, how students related to issues of diversity and race within the seminars was promoted or hindered by how postsecondary educators organized learning environments. Advisors/Committee Members: Michele S. Moses, Kris Gutierrez, Margaret Eisenhart, Daryl Maeda, Guillermo Solano-Flores.

Subjects/Keywords: cross-racial; education; university; adult; private; public; racial interaction; cultural interaction; Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education; Higher Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Paguyo, C. H. (2014). Enacting Diversity and Racial Projects on College Campuses: Tensions and Possibilities for Transforming Pedagogical Practices. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/45

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Paguyo, Christina Hong. “Enacting Diversity and Racial Projects on College Campuses: Tensions and Possibilities for Transforming Pedagogical Practices.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/45.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Paguyo, Christina Hong. “Enacting Diversity and Racial Projects on College Campuses: Tensions and Possibilities for Transforming Pedagogical Practices.” 2014. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Paguyo CH. Enacting Diversity and Racial Projects on College Campuses: Tensions and Possibilities for Transforming Pedagogical Practices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/45.

Council of Science Editors:

Paguyo CH. Enacting Diversity and Racial Projects on College Campuses: Tensions and Possibilities for Transforming Pedagogical Practices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2014. Available from: http://scholar.colorado.edu/educ_gradetds/45

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