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You searched for +publisher:"University of Cincinnati" +contributor:("Losada, Cristina"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Cincinnati

1. Barnett, Jessica R. Clusters, Clouds, and Constellations: Twelve-Tone Techniques and Variation Strategies in Two Concertos by Ginastera.

Degree: PhD, College-Conservatory of Music: Theory, 2015, University of Cincinnati

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Alberto Ginastera turned to twelve-tone composition. The personal twelve-tone language he developed during this time was largely an extension of the motivically-driven, sequentially-patterned, chromatic language he favored in his earlier, non-twelve-tone works. The primary objective of this study is twofold: (1) it illustrates the general characteristics of Ginastera’s compositional approach that remain consistent regardless of whether or not he uses a twelve-tone row as a point of departure; and (2) it demonstrates specific twelve-tone organizational strategies in the context of two of his earliest serial works, the Piano Concerto No. 1, Op. 28 (1961) and Violin Concerto, Op. 30 (1963). Advisors/Committee Members: Losada, Cristina (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Music; Ginastera; Concerto; Variation; Composing-out; Octatonic; Twelve tone

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barnett, J. R. (2015). Clusters, Clouds, and Constellations: Twelve-Tone Techniques and Variation Strategies in Two Concertos by Ginastera. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1427980834

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barnett, Jessica R. “Clusters, Clouds, and Constellations: Twelve-Tone Techniques and Variation Strategies in Two Concertos by Ginastera.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1427980834.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barnett, Jessica R. “Clusters, Clouds, and Constellations: Twelve-Tone Techniques and Variation Strategies in Two Concertos by Ginastera.” 2015. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Barnett JR. Clusters, Clouds, and Constellations: Twelve-Tone Techniques and Variation Strategies in Two Concertos by Ginastera. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1427980834.

Council of Science Editors:

Barnett JR. Clusters, Clouds, and Constellations: Twelve-Tone Techniques and Variation Strategies in Two Concertos by Ginastera. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2015. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1427980834


University of Cincinnati

2. Ayers, William R. Structural Properties and Compositional Processes in Microtonal Equal Temperaments.

Degree: PhD, College-Conservatory of Music: Theory, 2018, University of Cincinnati

This dissertation provides analytical and theoretical models for the understanding of music in microtonal equal temperaments, specifically focusing on nineteen-tone and thirty-one-tone equal temperaments. It provides a conceptual basis for the study of these equal temperaments and displays the applicability of tonal, atonal, and serial constructs in non-twelve-tone contexts.The first two chapters provide a conceptual, structural, and historical background for the dissertation. Chapter I draws a distinction in microtonal practice between composers using just intonation and those using equal temperaments. This chapter indicates some correspondences between these schools of thought and provides a structural basis for the equal temperaments examined in the rest of the dissertation. Chapter II offers a conceptual history of microtonal equal temperaments, specifically focusing on precursors to this practice in extended meantone temperaments. This history outlines two tuning lineages, one from quarter-comma meantone temperament to thirty-one-tone equal temperament and the other from third-comma meantone temperament to nineteen-tone equal temperament.The final three chapters examine modern applications of microtonal equal temperaments. Chapter III considers Joseph Yasser’s concept of the supra-diatonic scale, which contains twelve regular scale degrees and seven auxiliary scale degrees, and applies his theories to the analysis of nineteen-tone music. The chapter introduces a modified version of Steven Rings’s tonal generalized interval system to model intervallic relations in nineteen-tone equal temperament, using Yasser’s scale-degree functions as guides. This supra-tonal GIS is then used to analyze a piece by Easley Blackwood written in nineteen-tone equal temperament. Chapter IV provides a gestural/transformational model for the generalized thirty-one-tone keyboard and its music. This model coordinates physical performance gestures and musical transformations using a modified Tonnetz that models the notes of thirty-one-tone equal temperament. By considering the perspectives of both the performer and the listener, I use this model to analyze two miniatures by Joel Mandelbaum written for the thirty-one-tone archiphone keyboard. The three sections of Chapter V are focused on separate concepts of serial practice in microtonal contexts. The first section deals with the concept of subset serialism in microtonality, comparable to nondodecaphonic serialism in the context of twelve-tone equal temperament, using serial rows containing only a subset of the complete content of a pitch-class space. The second section deals with the concepts of generative cycles and near bisection as applied to non-twelve-tone equal temperaments and categorizes the aggregate generators that most nearly bisect a pitch-class space, taking cues from the literature on diatonic set theory. The third section deals with the concepts of serial multiplication, serial rotation, and all-interval row forms in non-twelve-tone equal temperaments. These concepts are… Advisors/Committee Members: Losada, Cristina (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Music; Microtonal; Equal temperament; Music; Transformational theory; Tuning; Microtonality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ayers, W. R. (2018). Structural Properties and Compositional Processes in Microtonal Equal Temperaments. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin153570341690339

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ayers, William R. “Structural Properties and Compositional Processes in Microtonal Equal Temperaments.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin153570341690339.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ayers, William R. “Structural Properties and Compositional Processes in Microtonal Equal Temperaments.” 2018. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Ayers WR. Structural Properties and Compositional Processes in Microtonal Equal Temperaments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin153570341690339.

Council of Science Editors:

Ayers WR. Structural Properties and Compositional Processes in Microtonal Equal Temperaments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin153570341690339

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