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You searched for +publisher:"University of Cincinnati" +contributor:("Barton, Keith"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Cincinnati

1. RAUPACH, MARY PAT. “It Depends on the Kind of History That You Learn”: Teacher Practices and Students’ Understanding of History and Race.

Degree: EdD, Education : Curriculum and Instruction, 2008, University of Cincinnati

This qualitative research investigated secondary students’ ideas about history and race in relation to teachers’ classroom practices. Situated within the context of an African American history course at a large, diverse public high school, this research adopted a case study design to examine two teachers’ practices with 79 students enrolled in African American Cultures. The majority of these students identified themselves as African Americans; seven students were European Americans. Data were collected through 96 hours of classroom observations, semi-structured individual interviews with two teachers, semi-structured individual or focus group interviews with 14 students, and student artifacts. Student interviews included an elicitation task with 12 historical pictures that featured people, events, or circumstances from the eighteenth century through the present day. Students were asked to organize these pictures into groups that made sense to them and then explain their choices. Student data were organized into individual case studies, with the 13 student cases from one classroom forming a collective case study (Dyson & Genishi, 2005; Patton, 2002). Similarly, each teacher represented one individual case study. Field note data from each classroom supplemented these case studies during comparisons between student understanding and teacher practices. Whereas data on teacher practices collected from teacher interviews and field notes served to triangulate student data, this information independently underwent analysis to assess how effectively classroom instruction prepared students for democratic citizenship, as described by Barton and Levstik (2004) in their discussion of the three characteristics of a humanistic study of history. The findings indicate that, regardless of background, students represented history as struggle interwoven with progress. Moreover, students claimed this history course filled in gaps in their knowledge and they represented race mostly in relation to personal racialized experiences. Whereas the first and second themes correspond with teacher goals and practices, students’ understanding of race mostly does not correspond with instruction. These findings illustrate the influence of social context upon student understanding and suggest that teacher practices, guided by each teacher’s sense of purpose, shaped student learning in distinctive ways. Advisors/Committee Members: Barton, Keith (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Secondary Education; race; history; secondary education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

RAUPACH, M. P. (2008). “It Depends on the Kind of History That You Learn”: Teacher Practices and Students’ Understanding of History and Race. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1217880750

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

RAUPACH, MARY PAT. ““It Depends on the Kind of History That You Learn”: Teacher Practices and Students’ Understanding of History and Race.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1217880750.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

RAUPACH, MARY PAT. ““It Depends on the Kind of History That You Learn”: Teacher Practices and Students’ Understanding of History and Race.” 2008. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

RAUPACH MP. “It Depends on the Kind of History That You Learn”: Teacher Practices and Students’ Understanding of History and Race. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2008. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1217880750.

Council of Science Editors:

RAUPACH MP. “It Depends on the Kind of History That You Learn”: Teacher Practices and Students’ Understanding of History and Race. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2008. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1217880750


University of Cincinnati

2. GRATZ, MICHELLE L. A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS' AND TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE WRITING PROCESS.

Degree: MEd, Education : Curriculum and Instruction, 2005, University of Cincinnati

This study was an attempt to view the writing process through the eyes of the students. It was an effort to discover what students believe about writing, specifically about the social aspects and the process of writing. In addition, teachers were questioned to determine if they could accurately report what students believe about writing. Questionnaires were completed by 80 fourth-grade students and 3 fourth-grade teachers in a middle-class, suburban district. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 5 students and 1 teacher. Findings showed that students value being creative and choosing their own topic. Students also stated that content and mechanics, followed closely by neatness, were the most important aspects of good writing. Results of teachers’ reports of student beliefs were mixed. When reporting which genres students enjoy the most, teachers accurately reported fictional stories, letters and journals. However, teachers believed that students enjoyed the social aspects (sharing and discussing their writing with others) more than the students actually did. Students reported that they preferred the private aspects of writing (drawing pictures, being creative and typing). Advisors/Committee Members: Barton, Keith (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: writing instruction; students' perceptions; writing process; student beliefs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

GRATZ, M. L. (2005). A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS' AND TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE WRITING PROCESS. (Masters Thesis). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1116367906

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

GRATZ, MICHELLE L. “A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS' AND TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE WRITING PROCESS.” 2005. Masters Thesis, University of Cincinnati. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1116367906.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

GRATZ, MICHELLE L. “A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS' AND TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE WRITING PROCESS.” 2005. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

GRATZ ML. A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS' AND TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE WRITING PROCESS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2005. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1116367906.

Council of Science Editors:

GRATZ ML. A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS' AND TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE WRITING PROCESS. [Masters Thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2005. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1116367906

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