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You searched for +publisher:"University of Cape Town" +contributor:("Abrahams, Naeema"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. De Villiers, Tania. Engaging male university student leaders in the adaptation process of the One Man Can Intervention (OMCI) to inform sexual violence prevention strategies in student residences: a case study.

Degree: Image, Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 2016, University of Cape Town

Sexual violence is a human rights violation, which affects physical, sexual, reproductive, mental and social well-being. The overwhelming burden of sexual violence is borne mostly by women and children at the hands of men. The university environment is no exception, and the impacts of sexual violence on students are multiple and complex. The extent of sexual violence in universities in South Africa is largely unknown, but local media allude to its common occurrence. University residences have been identified as communities at risk for sexual violence globally, and recent developments in primary prevention interventions for sexual violence globally and in South Africa provide opportunities to address this issue among university students. The focus of this thesis was on primary prevention, recognising that men are part of the solution. Male university student leaders residing in residences were engaged in a participatory process of adapting the One Man Can Intervention, which is a South African community-based primary prevention intervention to address Gender Based Violence and spread of HIV infection. The One Man Can Intervention has never been adapted for use with university students and although numerous sexual violence prevention interventions have been implemented and found to be effective in higher education institutions in other developed countries, no primary prevention interventions have yet been reported within South African university residences. The aim of this study was to identify and describe the process of adaptation and implementation of the One Man Can Intervention with male university students to inform primary prevention strategies against sexual violence within university residences. A qualitative research methodology was used to conduct this study, using a case study design. Process evaluation was used to understand the case. Participants included 15 student leaders from five male university residences who participated in the series of workshops, which evolved into the adapted intervention. The study used focus groups, direct observations, participants' reflections and semi-structured interviews. Thematic data analysis was used to analyse the data. The adaptation process led to development of a new intervention of six workshops, named by the participants 'Men With Conscience', which indicated ownership of the adapted intervention. The findings suggest that through participation in a series of six workshops, which addressed issues around gender norms and values, societal pressures for men's behaviour, understanding rape, bystander intervention and fostering healthy relationships, change was shown to be happening in the young men over the period of participation. Participants were challenged to think critically about sexual violence; they reflected on their role as men in prevention of sexual violence; they reached a turning point after they understood what rape meant and they called upon themselves to become accountable for prevention of sexual violence within the university structures and beyond.… Advisors/Committee Members: Duma, Sinegugu (advisor), Abrahams, Naeema (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Nursing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

De Villiers, T. (2016). Engaging male university student leaders in the adaptation process of the One Man Can Intervention (OMCI) to inform sexual violence prevention strategies in student residences: a case study. (Thesis). University of Cape Town. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22828

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

De Villiers, Tania. “Engaging male university student leaders in the adaptation process of the One Man Can Intervention (OMCI) to inform sexual violence prevention strategies in student residences: a case study.” 2016. Thesis, University of Cape Town. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22828.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

De Villiers, Tania. “Engaging male university student leaders in the adaptation process of the One Man Can Intervention (OMCI) to inform sexual violence prevention strategies in student residences: a case study.” 2016. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

De Villiers T. Engaging male university student leaders in the adaptation process of the One Man Can Intervention (OMCI) to inform sexual violence prevention strategies in student residences: a case study. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Cape Town; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22828.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

De Villiers T. Engaging male university student leaders in the adaptation process of the One Man Can Intervention (OMCI) to inform sexual violence prevention strategies in student residences: a case study. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22828

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Cape Town

2. Mathews, Shanaaz. Intimate femicide-suicide in South Africa : the epidemiology of male suicide following the killing of an intimate partner.

Degree: Image, Public Health and Family Medicine, 2005, University of Cape Town

The few studies on intimate femicide-suicide have mainly been conducted in developed countries. These studies have found that a disproportionate number of male partners commit suicide after killing their female partner. However, not much is known about intimate femicide-suicide in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to describe: the incidence and patterns of intimate femicide-suicide in South Africa and to compare the factors which distinguish intimate femicide-suicide from cases in which the perpetrator does not commit suicide. The study was designed as a retrospective national mortuary based study of all female homicides where the victim was aged 14 years and older for the year 1999. Data was collected from a stratified cluster sample of 25 mortuaries in South Africa. National incidence rates and factors associated with perpetrator suicide were derived by taking into account the stratification and weighting of mortuaries. This study found that 19.4% of intimate femicide perpetrators also commit suicide within a week of the murder. The estimated rates for intimate femicide-suicide were 1.7/100 000 women 14 years and older and 2.1/100 000 males 14 years and older. A logistic regression analysis to compare the factors which distinguish intimate femicide-suicide from cases in which the perpetrator does not commit suicide shows that perpetrator suicide were associated with: the perpetrator being of White race; employed as a professional or white collar worker; and owing a legal gun. The study findings have shown that South Africa has the highest reported rate for intimate femicide-suicide in the world. This poses an important public health problem. Unraveling the factors associated with perpetrator suicide after killing an intimate partner is complex. However, legal gun ownership plays a significant role in such killings. It is therefore imperative that access to guns be controlled and monitored. Advisors/Committee Members: Abrahams, Naeema (advisor), Mathews, Catherine (advisor), Jewkes, Rachel (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Public Health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mathews, S. (2005). Intimate femicide-suicide in South Africa : the epidemiology of male suicide following the killing of an intimate partner. (Thesis). University of Cape Town. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9388

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mathews, Shanaaz. “Intimate femicide-suicide in South Africa : the epidemiology of male suicide following the killing of an intimate partner.” 2005. Thesis, University of Cape Town. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9388.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mathews, Shanaaz. “Intimate femicide-suicide in South Africa : the epidemiology of male suicide following the killing of an intimate partner.” 2005. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Mathews S. Intimate femicide-suicide in South Africa : the epidemiology of male suicide following the killing of an intimate partner. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Cape Town; 2005. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9388.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mathews S. Intimate femicide-suicide in South Africa : the epidemiology of male suicide following the killing of an intimate partner. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9388

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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