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You searched for +publisher:"University of Auckland" +contributor:("Professor Bruce Arroll"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Auckland

1. Crengle, Suzanne Marie. The management of children's asthma in primary care : Are there ethnic differences in care?.

Degree: 2008, University of Auckland

Background Asthma is a common problem in New Zealand, and is associated with significant morbidity and costs to children, their families, and wider society. Previously published New Zealand literature suggested that M??ori and Pacific children were less likely than NZ European children to receive asthma medications and elements of asthma education, had poorer knowledge of asthma, and experienced greater morbidity and hospitalisations. However, none of the previous literature had been specifically designed to assess the nature of asthma care in the community, or to specifically answer whether there were ethnic disparities in care. A systematic review of studies published in the international literature that compared asthma management among different ethnic groups drawn from community-based samples was undertaken. The results of this review suggested that minority ethnic group children were less likely to receive elements of asthma medication use, asthma education and self-management (action) plans. Objectives The primary objectives of the study were to: ??? describe the use of medications, medication delivery systems, asthma education, and self-management plans in primary care for M??ori, Pacific, and Other ethnic group children ??? ascertain whether there were any ethnic disparities in the use of medications, medication delivery systems, asthma education, and self-management plans in primary care after controlling for differences in socio-economic position and other potential confounders. Secondary objectives were to: ??? describe the asthma-related utilisation of GP, after hours medical care, emergency departments, and hospital admissions among M??ori, Pacific, and Other ethnic group children with asthma ??? ascertain whether differences in medication use, the provision of asthma education, and the provision of self-management plans explained ethnic differences in health service utilisation. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Auckland, New Zealand. The caregivers of 647 children who were aged 2???14 years, had a diagnosis of asthma or experienced ???wheeze or whistling in the chest???, and had experienced symptoms in the previous 12 months were identified using random residential address start points and door knocking. Ethnically stratified sampling ratios were used to ensure that approximately equal numbers of children of M??ori, Pacific and Other ethnicity were enrolled into the study. A face-to-face interview was conducted with the caregivers of these children. Data was collected about: socio-demographic factors; asthma morbidity; asthma medications and delivery devices; exposure to, and experiences of, asthma education and asthma action plans; and asthma-related health services utilisation. Results In this study, the caregivers of 647 eligible children were invited to participate and 583 completed the interview, giving an overall completion rate of 90.1%. There were no ethnic differences in completion rates. The overall use of inhaled corticosteroid… Advisors/Committee Members: Professor Bruce Arroll, Dr Paul Brown.

Subjects/Keywords: Ethnic disparities; Maori; Pacific; Children; Asthma; Primary care; New Zealand; Health services research; Kaupapa Maori Research; Quality of care

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crengle, S. M. (2008). The management of children's asthma in primary care : Are there ethnic differences in care?. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Auckland. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2292/4957

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crengle, Suzanne Marie. “The management of children's asthma in primary care : Are there ethnic differences in care?.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Auckland. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/4957.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crengle, Suzanne Marie. “The management of children's asthma in primary care : Are there ethnic differences in care?.” 2008. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Crengle SM. The management of children's asthma in primary care : Are there ethnic differences in care?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Auckland; 2008. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/4957.

Council of Science Editors:

Crengle SM. The management of children's asthma in primary care : Are there ethnic differences in care?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Auckland; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/4957


University of Auckland

2. Elley, Carolyn Raina. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Green Prescription physical activity intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary health care.

Degree: 2003, University of Auckland

This thesis assesses the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the 'Green Prescription' physical activity intervention amongst less-active adults in primary care, using the Auckland Heart Study (AHS) questionnaire to assess change in activity. The validity of two physical-activity questionnaires, the AHS and the GSS questionnaires, was assessed initially, comparing their performance with 7-day activity diaries and pedometers amongst less-active adults in primary care. A cluster randomised controlled trial was then conducted in the waikato region of New Zealand, with 42 general practices randomised to give the Green Prescription or 'usual care'. A systematic screening process identified less-active 40-79 year-old patients. Main outcome measures included change in physical activity, quality of life (SF-36), coronary risk, and blood pressure, over a twelve-month period. Costs of the programme and offset costs of primary and secondary health care utilisation, productivity, and exercising, were collected prospectively for cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal perspective. The AHS questionnaire was found to have adequate reliability and validity, and to be the most appropriate measurement tool for use in primary care research. In the Green Prescription trial, 74% of general practitioners (n=117) and 66% of screened eligible patients (n=878) participated. Follow-up rate, at one year, was 85% (n=750). Mean total energy expenditure increased by 9.4 kcal/kg/week (p=0.001) and leisure exercise by 2.7.kcal/kg/week (p=0.02) or 34 minutes/week more in the intervention group than the control group (p=0.04). The proportion of the intervention group undertaking 21/2 hours/week of leisure exercise increased by 9.72% (p=0.003) more than in the control group (NNT=10.3). SF-36 measures of 'general health', 'role-physical', 'vitality', and ???bodily pain' improved significantly more in the intervention group (p<0.05), as a result of the Green Prescription intervention. There was a trend towards decreasing blood Pressure, no increase in adverse events, and no statistically significant difference in four-year risk of coronary heart disease. The cost of delivering the Green prescription was 170.45 per participant from a funder's perspective and 37.16 (95%CI:-945.21,1019.53) from a societal perspective. To increase leisure-time exercise by one hour per week cost 25.36 per month from a programme funder's perspective and 5.47 (95%CI:-138.90,149.84)per month from a societal perspective. The AHS questionnaire was considered reliable and valid. The Green Prescription intervention is effective in increasing physical activity and improving quality of life over 12 months without evidence of adverse effects. The intervention is more cost-effective than other physical activity interventions reported in the literature and may be cost-saving in terms of long-term health gains. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr Ngaire Kerse, Associate Professor Bruce Arroll, Professor Boyd Swinburn.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Elley, C. R. (2003). The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Green Prescription physical activity intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary health care. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Auckland. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3095

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Elley, Carolyn Raina. “The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Green Prescription physical activity intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary health care.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Auckland. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3095.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Elley, Carolyn Raina. “The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Green Prescription physical activity intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary health care.” 2003. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Elley CR. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Green Prescription physical activity intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary health care. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Auckland; 2003. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3095.

Council of Science Editors:

Elley CR. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Green Prescription physical activity intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary health care. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Auckland; 2003. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3095

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