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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Shane Gadberry"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Diaz Gomez, Jose Manuel. Methods to Evaluate Ruminant Animal Production Responses.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Arkansas

In experiment 1, 80 steers (197.0 kg initial body weight; BW for fall, 116.9 kg for spring), were stocked at 2.45 and 4.1 calves/ha in fall and spring, respectively in 16 tall fescue pastures [fall ergovaline (EV) = 1,475 ppb and spring EV = 1,173 ppb] under 2 treatments, mineral (MIN) (n = 8) and cumulative management (CM) (n = 8). Forage allowance did not differ (P = 0.76) between CM and MIN during fall but differed during spring (P ≤ 0.05, 2.55 vs. 3.22 kg DM/kg BW, for MIN and CM, respectively). For fall, average daily gain (ADG) resulted in 0.41 × EV for MIN and 1.05 × EV for CM. For spring, ADG resulted in 0.80 × EV for MIN and 0.94 EV for CM resulting in an increase of ADG for CM as the level of EV increased. In experiment 2, steers (n = 3) were fitted with a device (Icetag; IceRobotics) strapped to left metatarsus that measured motion activity while on varying levels of EV toxicity. Initial lying bouts for CM were 18.4 but decreased by 0.9 bouts for every 1,000 ppb EV increase. Period 2 resulted in standing time for MIN calves of 858.01 min/day (14.3 h/d) whereas CM calves spent 792.01 min/day (13.2 h/d) standing and CM calves took 20% more steps daily than MIN calves. For every 1,000 ppb increase in EV, steps decreased by 275. In experiment 3, calves (n = 4) grazed long sward regrowth (LSR) or short sward regrowth (SSR) tall fescue and alfalfa paddocks for forage quality, visual observations, rumen volatile fatty acids and diet selectivity measurements. No differences in these behavior measurements were observed for either forage (P < 0.05). Within fescue paddocks, ruminal ammonia, total volatile fatty acids (VFA), acetate, and the branch-chain VFA were greater from SSR vs. LSR (P < 0.05), but these differences were not observed (P ≥ 0.11) on alfalfa paddocks. In summary, the effect of combined management strategies offers potential to cope with toxicity in tall fescue pastures. Grazing activities of cattle grazing tall fescue or alfalfa may influence intake, but further research is needed to determine these behavioral modifications when differences in sward height are small. Advisors/Committee Members: Ken Coffey, Shane Gadberry, Charles Rosenkrans.

Subjects/Keywords: Animal Productivity; Animal Nutrition; Forage Quality; Plant-Animal-Soil Relationship; Production; Responses; Ruminant; Animal Diseases; Animal Studies; Beef Science; Horticulture; Meat Science; Plant Pathology

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APA (6th Edition):

Diaz Gomez, J. M. (2019). Methods to Evaluate Ruminant Animal Production Responses. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3508

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Diaz Gomez, Jose Manuel. “Methods to Evaluate Ruminant Animal Production Responses.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3508.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Diaz Gomez, Jose Manuel. “Methods to Evaluate Ruminant Animal Production Responses.” 2019. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Diaz Gomez JM. Methods to Evaluate Ruminant Animal Production Responses. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3508.

Council of Science Editors:

Diaz Gomez JM. Methods to Evaluate Ruminant Animal Production Responses. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3508


University of Arkansas

2. Ryan, Anthony. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.

Degree: MS, 2014, University of Arkansas

A series of studies were conducted to determine the effect of supplemental trace mineral source on growth performance, morbidity, and trace mineral status in growing beef cattle. The first experiment evaluated supplemental trace minerals from sulfate, organic, or hydroxy sources on growth performance and morbidity. Crossbreed beef calves were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments consisting of supplemental zinc (360 mg/d), copper (125 mg/d), and manganese (200 mg/d) from inorganic, organic, or hydroxy sources fed daily over a 42 to 45-d backgrounding phase. After removal of chronic and dead calves from the data set, trace mineral source had no effect on final or intermediate weights (P > 0.55) or average daily gain (P = 0.51). For all calves, dietary treatments had no effect on any morbidity measurements (P ≥ 0.53). Overall, trace mineral source had no effect on total weight gain, average daily gain, or morbidity during the receiving phase in shipping stressed cattle. A second experiment was conducted to study the effect of trace mineral source on trace mineral status, superoxide dismutase activity, and performance in beef heifers fed diets high in sulfur. Crossbreed heifers were stratified into 3 treatments consisting of 1) no supplemental trace minerals; 2) supplemental copper (55 mg/d), zinc (165 mg/d), and manganese (110 mg/d) from sulfate sources; or 3) supplemental zinc, copper, and manganese at isolevels to treatment 2 from hydroxy sources fed daily over a 55-d trial. Final and intermediate weights (P = 0.73), average daily gain (P = 0.70), and plasma copper and zinc concentrations (P ≥ 0.37) were not affected by treatment. Liver copper concentrations on d 55 were greater for the sulfate treatment (P > 0.004) compared to control and hydroxy treatments, however, liver zinc concentrations were not affected (P > 0.29). Treatment had no effect on (P ≥ 0.36) on total- or manganese-superoxide dismutase activity, however, a day effect (P ≥ 0.002) was observed. Overall, trace mineral source had no effect on growth performance, plasma mineral concentration, liver zinc concentrations, or superoxide dismutase activity. However, liver copper concentrations on d 55 were affected by trace mineral source. Advisors/Committee Members: Elizabeth Kegley, Paul Beck, Shane Gadberry.

Subjects/Keywords: Beef Cattle; Trace Minerals; Meat Science; Other Animal Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Ryan, A. (2014). Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ryan, Anthony. “Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ryan, Anthony. “Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ryan A. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151.

Council of Science Editors:

Ryan A. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151


University of Arkansas

3. Brown, April C. Timing of Castration, with or without Analgesia, on Growth Performance, Hematology, and Behavior of Beef Calves.

Degree: MS, 2012, University of Arkansas

Angus-sired (n = 30) and Hereford-sired (n = 32) bull calves were assigned randomly to 1 of 4 treatments. Treatments were 1) surgical castration near birth, 2) oral administration of the analgesic meloxicam (1 mg/kg of body weight) followed by surgical castration near birth, 3) surgical castration at weaning, or 4) surgical castration at weaning with oral administration of the analgesic meloxicam (1 mg/kg of body weight). Data was recorded for behavior, hematology, and growth at birth and weaning. Calf standing and lying activity was monitored at both stages by recording x and y axis positions of a data logger accelerometer attached to the metatarsus of the right leg for 7 d. At birth, blood was collected on d 0 (birth), 1, 3, and 7 from a subset of calves, and post-weaning blood samples were collected on d 214 (weaning), 214 + 6 h, 215, 217, 221, and 228. Body weight was recorded on all calves on d 4, 33, 66, 116, 162, 199, and 214 (weaning). Body weight was recorded on all weaned calves on d 214 (weaning), 228, 246, and 270. Average daily gain did not differ between treatments (P ¡Ý 0.88) through weaning. The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio at birth decreased with day (P < 0.0001). Following castration at birth, there were no differences in treatments for any of the three observed positions. Overall, post-weaning ADG was greater (P = 0.02) in steers compared to bulls castrated without meloxicam. At weaning the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio displayed a d effect (P < 0.0001), with an increase at 6 h post castration, and then decreasing. Post-weaning behavior following castration resulted in steers spending the least proportion of time standing, and bulls castrated with analgesia tended to spend less time, numerically, lying on sternum compared to steers. Advisors/Committee Members: Jeremy Powell, Shane Gadberry, Yvonne Thaxton.

Subjects/Keywords: Biological sciences; Analgesia; Behavior; Castration; Growth; Hematology; Meloxicam; Other Animal Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Brown, A. C. (2012). Timing of Castration, with or without Analgesia, on Growth Performance, Hematology, and Behavior of Beef Calves. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/663

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, April C. “Timing of Castration, with or without Analgesia, on Growth Performance, Hematology, and Behavior of Beef Calves.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/663.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, April C. “Timing of Castration, with or without Analgesia, on Growth Performance, Hematology, and Behavior of Beef Calves.” 2012. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Brown AC. Timing of Castration, with or without Analgesia, on Growth Performance, Hematology, and Behavior of Beef Calves. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/663.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown AC. Timing of Castration, with or without Analgesia, on Growth Performance, Hematology, and Behavior of Beef Calves. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2012. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/663

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