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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Scott H. Eidelman"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Dueweke, Aubrey Renee. The Effects of Brief, Passive Psychoeducation on Suicide Literacy, Stigma, and Attitudes Toward Help-Seeking Among Latino Immigrants Living in the United States.

Degree: MA, 2016, University of Arkansas

Latino immigrants drastically underutilize mental health treatment services compared to other ethnic groups, despite rates of mental illness that are comparable to those observed among the general population. With regards to suicidal behavior specifically, twice as many Latino suicide attempters do not seek or receive psychiatric services in the year prior to attempting suicide, compared to non-Latino White attempters. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether provision of brief, passive psychoeducation in the form of a brochure could increase suicide literacy (i.e., recognizing suicidal behavior, understanding risk factors and causes of suicidal behavior), reduce stigma toward suicidal behavior, and facilitate more positive attitudes toward help-seeking among a population of first generation Latino immigrants. It was hypothesized that the participants randomly assigned to the experimental group receiving psychoeducation regarding suicide would demonstrate greater suicide literacy, less suicide stigma, and more positive attitudes toward help-seeking than participants randomly assigned to the control group receiving psychoeducation about exercise. Results revealed that, while psychoeducation did significantly increase suicide literacy, it was not effective at changing stigmatizing attitudes towards suicidal individuals or improving attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help. However, lower levels of stigma were associated with more positive attitudes toward seeking help. These findings support the potential for a brief educational intervention to increase literacy among this population, but raise questions about how to effectively reduce stigma and improve attitudes toward treatment-seeking. Advisors/Committee Members: Ana J. Bridges, Matthew T. Feldner, Scott H. Eidelman.

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Help-seeking; Latinos; Mental health literacy; Psychoeducation; Stigma; Suicide; Clinical Psychology; Latina/o Studies; Multicultural Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dueweke, A. R. (2016). The Effects of Brief, Passive Psychoeducation on Suicide Literacy, Stigma, and Attitudes Toward Help-Seeking Among Latino Immigrants Living in the United States. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1446

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dueweke, Aubrey Renee. “The Effects of Brief, Passive Psychoeducation on Suicide Literacy, Stigma, and Attitudes Toward Help-Seeking Among Latino Immigrants Living in the United States.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed July 23, 2019. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1446.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dueweke, Aubrey Renee. “The Effects of Brief, Passive Psychoeducation on Suicide Literacy, Stigma, and Attitudes Toward Help-Seeking Among Latino Immigrants Living in the United States.” 2016. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Dueweke AR. The Effects of Brief, Passive Psychoeducation on Suicide Literacy, Stigma, and Attitudes Toward Help-Seeking Among Latino Immigrants Living in the United States. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1446.

Council of Science Editors:

Dueweke AR. The Effects of Brief, Passive Psychoeducation on Suicide Literacy, Stigma, and Attitudes Toward Help-Seeking Among Latino Immigrants Living in the United States. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1446


University of Arkansas

2. Sweeney, Lindsey Nicole. Jurors' Ability to Judge the Reliability of Confessions and Denials: Effects of Camera Perspective During Interrogation.

Degree: MA, 2011, University of Arkansas

Previous research shows that some proportion of people interrogated confess, regardless of actual guilt. It has also been shown that the camera perspective from which an interrogation is videotaped influences later judgments of voluntariness and guilt, as well as sentencing recommendations. The present research extends the understanding of this phenomenon of false confessions and the camera perspective bias. Ecologically valid videotaped true/false confessions and denials were obtained in Experiment 1. The proportions of guilt participants and participants that confessed to cheating were found to be smaller in Experiment 1 than those in previous research. Participants in Experiment 2 viewed the videotapes from the first experiment from a suspect-focused, interrogator-focused, or equal-focused camera perspective and judged the suspects' guilt as well as made attributions of responsibility for the suspects' statements. Results from the second experiment did not show a camera perspective bias in judgments of guilt; however, camera perspective did influence the type and amount of attributions made. Implications of these findings are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: James M. Lampinen, Scott H. Eidelman, William H. Levine.

Subjects/Keywords: Social sciences; Attribution; Camera perspective; Confession; Interrogation; Law and Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sweeney, L. N. (2011). Jurors' Ability to Judge the Reliability of Confessions and Denials: Effects of Camera Perspective During Interrogation. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/150

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sweeney, Lindsey Nicole. “Jurors' Ability to Judge the Reliability of Confessions and Denials: Effects of Camera Perspective During Interrogation.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed July 23, 2019. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/150.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sweeney, Lindsey Nicole. “Jurors' Ability to Judge the Reliability of Confessions and Denials: Effects of Camera Perspective During Interrogation.” 2011. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Sweeney LN. Jurors' Ability to Judge the Reliability of Confessions and Denials: Effects of Camera Perspective During Interrogation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2011. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/150.

Council of Science Editors:

Sweeney LN. Jurors' Ability to Judge the Reliability of Confessions and Denials: Effects of Camera Perspective During Interrogation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/150

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