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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Richard Sonn"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Lenser, Amber Michelle. The South African Women's Movement: The Roles of Feminism and Multiracial Cooperation in the Struggle for Women's Rights.

Degree: MA, 2019, University of Arkansas

In the historiography of South Africa’s recent past, focus has been most heavily placed on apartheid and the anti-apartheid movement, with much emphasis placed on male involvement and men as the primary agents of change in the country. Women are largely viewed as playing a supportive role to male activists throughout the movement, and far less has been written on female involvement or women’s activism in its own right. Running parallel to the anti-apartheid movement, however, was a women’s movement characterized by women across the racial and socioeconomic spectrum struggling to secure their own rights in a very hostile and patriarchal political climate. The struggle of these women for their country but also for their own political rights has been largely overlooked in the existing narratives regarding South African history, as it has been overshadowed by the greater independence movement. By utilizing previously unused or undervalued sources including an array of oral histories as well as South African newspapers and organizational materials from important groups such as the Black Sash, I intend to show how influential South African women were on legislation passed under and immediately following apartheid, as well as their impact on the broader national struggle. I will also highlight the many formal and informal ways that these women carved out their own spaces, and the moments when their efforts transcended racial and class lines in an effort to build a brighter future for all South African women. Advisors/Committee Members: Todd Cleveland, Richard Sonn, James Gigantino II.

Subjects/Keywords: Activism; Apartheid; Feminism; South Africa; Women's Rights; African History; African Studies; Ethnic Studies; Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; History of Gender; Women's History; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lenser, A. M. (2019). The South African Women's Movement: The Roles of Feminism and Multiracial Cooperation in the Struggle for Women's Rights. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3397

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lenser, Amber Michelle. “The South African Women's Movement: The Roles of Feminism and Multiracial Cooperation in the Struggle for Women's Rights.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 12, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3397.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lenser, Amber Michelle. “The South African Women's Movement: The Roles of Feminism and Multiracial Cooperation in the Struggle for Women's Rights.” 2019. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Lenser AM. The South African Women's Movement: The Roles of Feminism and Multiracial Cooperation in the Struggle for Women's Rights. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3397.

Council of Science Editors:

Lenser AM. The South African Women's Movement: The Roles of Feminism and Multiracial Cooperation in the Struggle for Women's Rights. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3397


University of Arkansas

2. Samanta, Sidhartha. The Final Transfer of Power in India, 1937-1947: A Closer Look.

Degree: MA, 2011, University of Arkansas

The long freedom struggle in India culminated in a victory when in 1947 the country gained its independence from one hundred fifty years of British rule. The irony of this largely non-violent struggle led by Mahatma Gandhi was that it ended in the most violent and bloodiest partition of the country which claimed the lives of two million civilians and uprooted countless millions in what became the largest forced migration of people the world has ever witnessed. The vivisection of the country into Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan did not bring the hoped for peace between the two neighbors. The partition of the sub-continent created many new problems and solved none. In the last sixty years or so since partition, the two countries have gone to war with each other three times. When not in war, they have engaged in a non-ending cycle of accusations and counter-accusations at the slightest provocation and opportunity. The two most fundamental questions about the partition - was it inevitable and who is responsible for it - have not been fully answered despite countless theories and arguments that have been put forward by historians. This thesis attempts to answer those questions by objectively examining and analyzing the major events of the decade preceding the partition, unquestionably the most critical period to understanding the causes of partition. Advisors/Committee Members: Benjamin Grob-Fitzgibbon, Joel Gordon, Richard Sonn.

Subjects/Keywords: Social sciences; Indian independence struggle; Partition of India; The final transfer of power in India; Asian History; History of Religion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Samanta, S. (2011). The Final Transfer of Power in India, 1937-1947: A Closer Look. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/258

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Samanta, Sidhartha. “The Final Transfer of Power in India, 1937-1947: A Closer Look.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 12, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/258.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Samanta, Sidhartha. “The Final Transfer of Power in India, 1937-1947: A Closer Look.” 2011. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Samanta S. The Final Transfer of Power in India, 1937-1947: A Closer Look. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/258.

Council of Science Editors:

Samanta S. The Final Transfer of Power in India, 1937-1947: A Closer Look. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/258


University of Arkansas

3. Akturk, Ahmet Serdar. Imagining Kurdish Identity in Mandatory Syria: Finding a Nation in Exile.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Arkansas

This dissertation looks at the activities of the Kurdish nationalists from Turkey who were exiled in Syria and Lebanon during the period of the French mandate, and especially Jaladet and Kamuran Bedirkhan. Scions of a princely Kurdish family from the Botan region in Eastern Anatolia, the Bedirkhan brothers initiated a Kurdish cultural movement in exile following the failure of two armed rebellions against the new Turkish Republic in 1925 and 1930. Central to this cultural movement was the publication of journals in Damascus and Beirut, namely Hawar (1932-1943) Ronahi (1942-1945), Roja Nu/Le Jour Nouveau (1943-1946), and Ster (1943-1945). This study critically analyzes these Kurdish periodicals and other publications from Syria and Lebanon in the 1930s and 1940s to understand how exiled Kurdish nationalists imagined a new Kurdish identity in the Middle East following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the rise of the nation states. Kurdish journals became the platform for a vibrant discussion about the future of the Kurds across the region. They also became the vehicle for the formalization and spread of a national language as well as the construction of a new identity, rooted in tradition but also with the aim of creating new Kurdish men and women. Advisors/Committee Members: Joel Gordon, Richard Sonn, Nikolay Antov.

Subjects/Keywords: Social sciences; Communication and the arts; 20th century; Journalism; Kurds; Lebanon; Middle East history; Nationalism; Press; Syria; Islamic World and Near East History; Near and Middle Eastern Studies; Near Eastern Languages and Societies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Akturk, A. S. (2013). Imagining Kurdish Identity in Mandatory Syria: Finding a Nation in Exile. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/866

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Akturk, Ahmet Serdar. “Imagining Kurdish Identity in Mandatory Syria: Finding a Nation in Exile.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 12, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/866.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Akturk, Ahmet Serdar. “Imagining Kurdish Identity in Mandatory Syria: Finding a Nation in Exile.” 2013. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Akturk AS. Imagining Kurdish Identity in Mandatory Syria: Finding a Nation in Exile. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/866.

Council of Science Editors:

Akturk AS. Imagining Kurdish Identity in Mandatory Syria: Finding a Nation in Exile. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2013. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/866

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