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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Paul Beck"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Pickett, Autumn Tayler. Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture.

Degree: MS, 2020, University of Arkansas

Cattle grazing wheat pasture have the potential to gain BW exceptionally well, but excessive nitrogen intake results in increased excretion and increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Supplemental concentrates with the addition of an ionophore given to ruminants grazing wheat is a potential practice for producers to increase nitrogen efficiency while decreasing GHG emissions. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to quantify the effects of energy (2.95 kg/d) and lasalocid (200 mg/hd/d) supplementation on nutrient intake, energy metabolism, respiratory gas fluxes, and performance of grazing cattle. Methane emissions were not affected (P = 0.58) by treatment, hence methane intensity (P = 0.07) and yield (P <0.01) were reduced for supplemented cattle. Supplemented cattle had greater CO2 emissions (P = 0.04) and O2 consumption (P = 0.03). Average daily gain tended to be greater for supplemented cattle (P=0.09) compared to Control (1.22 and 1.00 kg, respectively); but no effect (P = 0.88) was observed with the lasalocid. Fecal output was greater for supplemented cattle (P < 0.01), but forage intake was lower (P < 0.01) and nutrient intake was higher (P < 0.01) for supplemented cattle compared to Control. Supplemented cattle had lower forage intake with greater CO2 emissions and O2 consumption, but lasalocid did not affect any parameter measured. For Year 1 performance each kilogram of supplement increased (P = 0.04) ADG by 73 g/d; however, lasalocid did not increase (P = 0.73) ADG (avg ADG = 1.7 kg). Total BW gain by each steer (kg) was increased (P = 0.04) 4.7 kg for each kilogram of supplement fed daily and again, lasalocid did not increase (P = 0.73) performance (avg total BW gain = 109 kg). For Year 2 performance each kilogram of supplement increased (P = 0.001) ADG by 58 g/d; however, lasalocid did not increase (P = 0.17) ADG (avg ADG = 1.4 kg). Total BW gain by each steer (kg) was increased (P = 0.001) 3.7 kg for each kilogram of supplement fed daily and again, lasalocid did not increase (P = 0.17) performance (avg total BW gain = 88 kg). Advisors/Committee Members: Elizabeth Kegley, Stacey Gunter, Paul Beck.

Subjects/Keywords: Cattle; Greenhouse gases; Methane; Nutrition; Production; Animal Experimentation and Research; Animal Studies; Beef Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Pickett, A. T. (2020). Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pickett, Autumn Tayler. “Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pickett, Autumn Tayler. “Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture.” 2020. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Pickett AT. Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627.

Council of Science Editors:

Pickett AT. Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627


University of Arkansas

2. Palmer, Elizabeth. Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production.

Degree: MS, 2018, University of Arkansas

Supplemental dietary yeast products are beneficial during times of stress. Calves experience increased levels of stress during birth, weaning, and the post-weaning receiving period. Therefore, 3 experiments were conducted to determine how yeast supplementation affects growth performance and health during this time. In experiment 1, 2 truckloads of highly stressed calves (n = 175; initial body weight [BW] = 226 ± 24.5 kg) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 treatments; unsupplemented control, or supplementation with 2 commercial yeast products (Y1 and Y2). Average daily gain (ADG) was not different (P = 0.99) during the 28 d receiving period; nor was there any difference (P = 0.29) in the percentage of calves treated for bovine respiratory disease. In experiment 2, heifer calves (n = 95; initial BW = 165 ± 27 kg) were randomly assigned to pastures and pastures were randomly assigned to treatment: 1) no yeast (CON), or 2) addition of yeast product (YP). Heifers were supplied treatments for 35 d prior to weaning and through a 42-d backgrounding period. Average daily gain prior to weaning was not different (P ≥ 0.45) between treatments. However, CON had increased (P = 0.01) ADG compared to YP from weaning to the end of the backgrounding period. Microbiome analysis found that supplemental yeast did not dramatically change α or β diversity nor was there a difference in community structure for rumen bacteria; fecal α or β diversity were different on d 34. In experiment 3, late gestation cows (n = 97) were supplemented YP approximately 45 d prior to parturition. At parturition colostrum and blood samples (n = 30) were collected to determine the effect on passive transfer. Supplementation ended 22 d after the last calf was born (d 85). Body weight on d 85 was greater (P = 0.01) for YP calves compared with CON. Cows that were supplemented YP had a lower (P = 0.03) neutrophil:lymphocyte at hour 0 and 48 after parturition. Similarly, calves on YP treatment had a lower (P = 0.02) neutrophil:lymphocyte at hour 48. Overall, effects of yeast supplementation have been variable between the 3 experiments. Advisors/Committee Members: Elizabeth Kegley, Paul Beck, Jeremy Powell.

Subjects/Keywords: Beef Cattle; Health; Yeast; Beef Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Palmer, E. (2018). Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Palmer, Elizabeth. “Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Palmer, Elizabeth. “Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production.” 2018. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Palmer E. Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918.

Council of Science Editors:

Palmer E. Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918


University of Arkansas

3. Ryan, Anthony. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.

Degree: MS, 2014, University of Arkansas

A series of studies were conducted to determine the effect of supplemental trace mineral source on growth performance, morbidity, and trace mineral status in growing beef cattle. The first experiment evaluated supplemental trace minerals from sulfate, organic, or hydroxy sources on growth performance and morbidity. Crossbreed beef calves were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments consisting of supplemental zinc (360 mg/d), copper (125 mg/d), and manganese (200 mg/d) from inorganic, organic, or hydroxy sources fed daily over a 42 to 45-d backgrounding phase. After removal of chronic and dead calves from the data set, trace mineral source had no effect on final or intermediate weights (P > 0.55) or average daily gain (P = 0.51). For all calves, dietary treatments had no effect on any morbidity measurements (P ≥ 0.53). Overall, trace mineral source had no effect on total weight gain, average daily gain, or morbidity during the receiving phase in shipping stressed cattle. A second experiment was conducted to study the effect of trace mineral source on trace mineral status, superoxide dismutase activity, and performance in beef heifers fed diets high in sulfur. Crossbreed heifers were stratified into 3 treatments consisting of 1) no supplemental trace minerals; 2) supplemental copper (55 mg/d), zinc (165 mg/d), and manganese (110 mg/d) from sulfate sources; or 3) supplemental zinc, copper, and manganese at isolevels to treatment 2 from hydroxy sources fed daily over a 55-d trial. Final and intermediate weights (P = 0.73), average daily gain (P = 0.70), and plasma copper and zinc concentrations (P ≥ 0.37) were not affected by treatment. Liver copper concentrations on d 55 were greater for the sulfate treatment (P > 0.004) compared to control and hydroxy treatments, however, liver zinc concentrations were not affected (P > 0.29). Treatment had no effect on (P ≥ 0.36) on total- or manganese-superoxide dismutase activity, however, a day effect (P ≥ 0.002) was observed. Overall, trace mineral source had no effect on growth performance, plasma mineral concentration, liver zinc concentrations, or superoxide dismutase activity. However, liver copper concentrations on d 55 were affected by trace mineral source. Advisors/Committee Members: Elizabeth Kegley, Paul Beck, Shane Gadberry.

Subjects/Keywords: Beef Cattle; Trace Minerals; Meat Science; Other Animal Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ryan, A. (2014). Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ryan, Anthony. “Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ryan, Anthony. “Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ryan A. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151.

Council of Science Editors:

Ryan A. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151

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