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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Michael Pierce"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Ownbey, Samuel Morris. 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership.

Degree: MA, 2020, University of Arkansas

This thesis examines the systematic dispossession of African American property by white planters in the Arkansas Delta. It argues white planters, backed by a legal system favorable to their interests, expropriated the black land in the once flourishing community of Edmondson, Arkansas. Founded in 1902 by African American business and political leaders, the Edmondson Home and Improvement Company purchased farmland and town lots and began to sell or rent the land to African Americans coming to the area. Located in Crittenden County, Edmondson represented black defiance in the face of Jim Crow laws and white supremacy. The town consisted of black-owned businesses financially supported by the productive cotton-growing soil that surrounded the town. However, the Great Depression lowered the price of cotton, and the town fell into decline. By the mid-1930s, New Deal programs, particularly the Agricultural Adjustment Agency, revitalized the cotton industry, making the land in Edmondson coveted by the dominant white planters. During this time, a white man named Weaver acquired a town lot through an African American agent working on his behalf. The arrival of the first white landowner in Edmondson set in motion a conspiracy to take the land from African Americans and place it under white planter control. By 1941, Weaver had acquired nearly 600 town lots and was collecting rent from the original owners. Left economically devastated and under the control of white planters, the black people of Edmondson had no resources to contest the loss of their land. When the Southern Tenant Farmers Union arrived in Edmondson in 1936, it used its connections to fund a civil suit against Weaver in which they alleged that Weaver’s acquisition was part of a conspiracy to wipe out the last independent black community in Crittenden County. The people claimed that the sheriff and tax collector of Crittenden County had declared their land delinquent for failure to pay a tax that he had not properly levied against them. Having declared the lands delinquent, the sheriff then sold the lands to the State of Arkansas. The state then conveyed the land to Weaver, leaving him virtually the sole proprietor of Edmondson. The civil suit lasted from 1941 to 1949 when a Crittenden County judge dismissed the suit without a trial, and the people of Edmondson never reclaimed their property. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Pierce, Caree Banton, Patrick Williams.

Subjects/Keywords: African Americans; Agriculture; Arkansas delta; Crittenden County; Edmondson; Landownership; African American Studies; American Politics; Cultural History; Race and Ethnicity; Rural Sociology; United States History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ownbey, S. M. (2020). 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ownbey, Samuel Morris. “'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ownbey, Samuel Morris. “'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership.” 2020. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Ownbey SM. 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702.

Council of Science Editors:

Ownbey SM. 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702


University of Arkansas

2. Schmidt, Kyra. Hello Girls on Strike: Telephone Operators, the Fort Smith General Strike and the Struggle for Democracy in Great War Arkansas.

Degree: MA, 2020, University of Arkansas

In September 1917, Fort Smith telephone operators formed a local of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Soon after, company leaders dismissed two of the women who were instrumental in the formation of the union. After many attempts to meet and negotiate with the company leaders, the remaining operators walked out and began striking on September 19. This strike lasted almost four months and brought chaos into the city including the indictments, trials, and convictions of the mayor, J. H. Wright, and chief of police, Jim Fernandez. The election after Wright’s conviction saw the first female votes in Arkansas history. This strike is an ideal example of the federal government’s relationship with the labor community at the beginning of World War I and Southwestern Bell Telephone Company’s relationship with labor unions inside their own corporation. However, the strike offers an interesting divergence from the usual relationship between male and female labor unions and the support each of them received from both the public and the federal government. The historiography on this strike is severely limited, and this work attempts to demonstrate why the Fort Smith strike is so vital to women’s labor, labor unrest, and the federal government during the beginning of the United States’ involvement in World War I. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Pierce, Patrick Williams, Elliott West.

Subjects/Keywords: Labor Relations; Southwestern Bell Telephone Company; Women's labor history; World War I; American Politics; American Studies; Collective Bargaining; Labor History; Unions; Women's History; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schmidt, K. (2020). Hello Girls on Strike: Telephone Operators, the Fort Smith General Strike and the Struggle for Democracy in Great War Arkansas. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3705

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schmidt, Kyra. “Hello Girls on Strike: Telephone Operators, the Fort Smith General Strike and the Struggle for Democracy in Great War Arkansas.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3705.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schmidt, Kyra. “Hello Girls on Strike: Telephone Operators, the Fort Smith General Strike and the Struggle for Democracy in Great War Arkansas.” 2020. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Schmidt K. Hello Girls on Strike: Telephone Operators, the Fort Smith General Strike and the Struggle for Democracy in Great War Arkansas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3705.

Council of Science Editors:

Schmidt K. Hello Girls on Strike: Telephone Operators, the Fort Smith General Strike and the Struggle for Democracy in Great War Arkansas. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3705


University of Arkansas

3. Hodge, Chelsea. “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939.

Degree: PhD, 2020, University of Arkansas

Over the course of three decades, white southern Methodist women took on issues of labor and poverty through their national women’s organization, the Woman’s Missionary Council (WMC). Between 1909 and 1939, the WMC focused their work on five groups of people they viewed as in need of their help: women, children, black southerners, immigrants, and rural people. Motivated by the Social Gospel and an intense belief that their faith led them to effect real change in the American South, the WMC intervened in people’s lives, pursuing reform that could at times be maternalistic and condescending but at other times radical and forward-thinking. Methodist women ultimately concluded that only state intervention could solve the systemic problems facing the poor and working-class, and they became staunch supporters of the New Deal. This dissertation examines the path to this conclusion, tracing the ways in which the WMC thought about and sought to help these groups changed over the span of thirty years, as World War I and the Great Depression shattered how the women viewed themselves and the world around them. Often at odds with other southerners of their race, class, and denomination, the women pressed onward in their bid to create an American welfare state. When the WMC dissolved into a new organization in 1939, white southern Methodist women were poised to be unprecedented allies in the mid-twentieth century civil rights movement. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Pierce, Patrick Williams, Beth Schweiger.

Subjects/Keywords: Activism; Civil Rights; Methodist; New Deal; South; Women; Christian Denominations and Sects; History of Religion; New Religious Movements; Politics and Social Change; Social Welfare; United States History; Women's History; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hodge, C. (2020). “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hodge, Chelsea. ““Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hodge, Chelsea. ““Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939.” 2020. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Hodge C. “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752.

Council of Science Editors:

Hodge C. “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2020. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752

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