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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Matthew S. Ganio"). Showing records 1 – 4 of 4 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Caldwell, Aaron Richard. Influence of Heating and Biological Sex on Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Long-Duration Sitting and Standing.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Arkansas

  Purpose: The purpose of these studies was to determine if arterial angulations (through sitting or standing), shear stress (through local heating), or a combination… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cardiovascular; health; physiology; vascular dysfunction; arterial angulations; Circulatory and Respiratory Physiology; Exercise Physiology; Exercise Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Caldwell, A. R. (2019). Influence of Heating and Biological Sex on Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Long-Duration Sitting and Standing. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3407

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caldwell, Aaron Richard. “Influence of Heating and Biological Sex on Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Long-Duration Sitting and Standing.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3407.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caldwell, Aaron Richard. “Influence of Heating and Biological Sex on Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Long-Duration Sitting and Standing.” 2019. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Caldwell AR. Influence of Heating and Biological Sex on Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Long-Duration Sitting and Standing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2019. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3407.

Council of Science Editors:

Caldwell AR. Influence of Heating and Biological Sex on Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Long-Duration Sitting and Standing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3407


University of Arkansas

2. Adams, Jon David. The Effect of Blinded Hydration State on Thermoregulation and Performance in Male Cyclists.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Arkansas

  Purpose: The purpose of these studies was to observe the effect of dehydration on exercise performance while subjects were blinded to their hydration status.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Exercise Performance; Hydration; Thermoregulation; Exercise Physiology; Exercise Science; Human and Clinical Nutrition

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APA (6th Edition):

Adams, J. D. (2017). The Effect of Blinded Hydration State on Thermoregulation and Performance in Male Cyclists. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2394

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Adams, Jon David. “The Effect of Blinded Hydration State on Thermoregulation and Performance in Male Cyclists.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2394.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Adams, Jon David. “The Effect of Blinded Hydration State on Thermoregulation and Performance in Male Cyclists.” 2017. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Adams JD. The Effect of Blinded Hydration State on Thermoregulation and Performance in Male Cyclists. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2017. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2394.

Council of Science Editors:

Adams JD. The Effect of Blinded Hydration State on Thermoregulation and Performance in Male Cyclists. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2394


University of Arkansas

3. Burchfield, Jenna Marie. Effects of Mild Hypohydration and Hyperthermia on Cognition and Mood in Obese and Non-Obese Females.

Degree: MS, 2015, University of Arkansas

  INTRODUCTION: Information regarding effects of hypohydration (HY) and hyperthermia (HT) on cognition, mood and development of symptoms is conflicting since the two conditions often… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Health and environmental sciences; Dehydration; Heat stress; Hydration; Neurocognitive; Obesity; Symptoms; Human and Clinical Nutrition; Psychiatric and Mental Health

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APA (6th Edition):

Burchfield, J. M. (2015). Effects of Mild Hypohydration and Hyperthermia on Cognition and Mood in Obese and Non-Obese Females. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1155

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burchfield, Jenna Marie. “Effects of Mild Hypohydration and Hyperthermia on Cognition and Mood in Obese and Non-Obese Females.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1155.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burchfield, Jenna Marie. “Effects of Mild Hypohydration and Hyperthermia on Cognition and Mood in Obese and Non-Obese Females.” 2015. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Burchfield JM. Effects of Mild Hypohydration and Hyperthermia on Cognition and Mood in Obese and Non-Obese Females. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2015. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1155.

Council of Science Editors:

Burchfield JM. Effects of Mild Hypohydration and Hyperthermia on Cognition and Mood in Obese and Non-Obese Females. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2015. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1155


University of Arkansas

4. Luhring, Katherine Elizabeth. Cooling Effectiveness of Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method Following Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

Degree: MAT, 2016, University of Arkansas

  Context: Recommended treatment of exertional heat stroke (EHS) includes whole body cold-water immersion (CWI); however, remote locations, spatial or monetary restrictions challenge CWI feasibility.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Health and environmental sciences; Exertional heat stroke; Heat illness; Heat strain; Tarp-assisted cooling; Sports Medicine

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Luhring, K. E. (2016). Cooling Effectiveness of Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method Following Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1491

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Luhring, Katherine Elizabeth. “Cooling Effectiveness of Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method Following Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1491.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Luhring, Katherine Elizabeth. “Cooling Effectiveness of Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method Following Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.” 2016. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Luhring KE. Cooling Effectiveness of Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method Following Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2016. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1491.

Council of Science Editors:

Luhring KE. Cooling Effectiveness of Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method Following Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1491

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