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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Karen Hodges"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Aberle, Andrew Mark. Community College Student Achievement in Web Based Software-Enhanced Developmental Mathematics Courses.

Degree: Doctor of Education in Higher Education (EdD), Higher Education (EdD), 2015, University of Arkansas

The purpose of this causal-comparative study was to compare the performance of students receiving web based software-enhanced instruction with the performance of students receiving lecture only instruction in terms of retention rates, success rates, test grades, and final exam scores for developmental mathematics courses at Ozarks Technical Community College. The researcher randomly selected 250 participants from the population of students experiencing software-enhanced instruction during the 2012-2013 academic year and 250 participants from the population of students experiencing lecture only instruction during the 2010-2011 academic year. Several demographic variables were compared to control for intervening variables. The sample data was tested against population records to address validity concerns. The researcher formed four conclusions: (a) course retention rates were not impacted after redesigning the developmental math courses; (b) success rates increased after the implementation of software-enhanced instruction; however, the improved rate may not have been fully attributed to the redesign; (c) the effects on unit exam scores were mixed with lower scores on the first test and higher scores on the second and third exams; (d) software-enhanced instruction did not significantly improve final exam scores. Advisors/Committee Members: James O. Hammons, Ketevan Mamiseishvili, Karen Hodges.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; College; Community; Computer; Developmental; Mathematics; Software; Community College Leadership; Science and Mathematics Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aberle, A. M. (2015). Community College Student Achievement in Web Based Software-Enhanced Developmental Mathematics Courses. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1074

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aberle, Andrew Mark. “Community College Student Achievement in Web Based Software-Enhanced Developmental Mathematics Courses.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1074.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aberle, Andrew Mark. “Community College Student Achievement in Web Based Software-Enhanced Developmental Mathematics Courses.” 2015. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Aberle AM. Community College Student Achievement in Web Based Software-Enhanced Developmental Mathematics Courses. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1074.

Council of Science Editors:

Aberle AM. Community College Student Achievement in Web Based Software-Enhanced Developmental Mathematics Courses. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2015. Available from: http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1074


University of Arkansas

2. Murders, Michael. A Phenomenological Study of the Online Education Experiences of College Students with Learning Disabilities.

Degree: Doctor of Education in Higher Education (EdD), Higher Education (EdD), 2017, University of Arkansas

The body of research concerning college students with learning disabilities is sparse relative to the percentage of college students with learning disabilities who attend college. Further, the majority of existing research fails to capture the student voice and the lived experiences of the students themselves. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of college students with learning disabilities who utilized online education at a public university centrally located in the United States, resembling numerous comprehensive regional universities. Using a qualitative, phenomenological research framework, this study uses in-depth individual interviews to collect data from eight participants. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Four categories emerged as central to their experiences as college students with learning disabilities: (1) faculty engagement, (2) student engagement, (3) course organization, and (4) needed resources. These four categories and their interconnections resulted in five major themes determined to be the results of this study: (1) students with learning disabilities like the convenience and flexibility of schedule afforded by online classes, (2) online structure and organization affords students with learning disabilities more time to process and understand information (3) students with learning disabilities feel more independent and confident with the structure and organization of online courses, (4) students with learning disabilities perceive a lack of interaction in online classes, and (5) instructors lack understanding and support of accommodations and students with learning disabilities. This study provides numerous opportunities for future research related to the topic and findings. The findings from this study may also provide context and insights for postsecondary institutions, faculty, student services personnel, and family of students with learning disabilities, as well as the students themselves. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Hevel, Ketevan Mamiseishvili, Karen Hodges.

Subjects/Keywords: Learning Disabilities; Online Education; Higher Education; Online and Distance Education; Special Education and Teaching

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Murders, M. (2017). A Phenomenological Study of the Online Education Experiences of College Students with Learning Disabilities. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2518

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murders, Michael. “A Phenomenological Study of the Online Education Experiences of College Students with Learning Disabilities.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2518.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murders, Michael. “A Phenomenological Study of the Online Education Experiences of College Students with Learning Disabilities.” 2017. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Murders M. A Phenomenological Study of the Online Education Experiences of College Students with Learning Disabilities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2518.

Council of Science Editors:

Murders M. A Phenomenological Study of the Online Education Experiences of College Students with Learning Disabilities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2017. Available from: http://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2518


University of Arkansas

3. Kinders, Mark Allan. The Acclimation Processes for New, First-time Presidents at Public, Master’s-level Comprehensive Institutions: Lessons Learned.

Degree: Doctor of Education in Higher Education (EdD), Higher Education (EdD), 2015, University of Arkansas

The purpose of this study was to learn the acclimation practices of new, first-time presidents at regional, public comprehensive institutions. An original survey conducted from January through March, 2015, was completed by 61 new CEOs for a 59% response rate. They reported numerous activities that were helpful to learn their organization so as to become sufficiently comfortable in their understanding of campus culture, governance processes, operational practices, regional partners, and state policy climate to lead their organizations forward. With experience they learned that acclimation took longer than they expected. The study found higher rates of female or minority CEOs, and more chief academic officers than reported in profiles of CEOs nationally. There were fewer “outsiders” to higher education, but fewer selected from within their institutions. They described the operational environment of their institutions and the immediacy of operational problems. Many were surprised by the immediacy of these challenges. Several areas were analyzed for gender differences, and also whether CEOs responses varied based on the operational environment they inherited. The CEOs reported similar professional pathways and preparation for the presidency, and shared feelings of rewards, successes, and frustrations. The CEOs indicated they removed significant numbers of inherited top executives. Female CEOs reported stronger empathy than male CEOs. This was reported both in those stakeholders with whom female CEOs developed strong relationships, and those with whom they struggled to connect. Finally, nearly 30% of the new CEOs reported they seriously thought about leaving their positions. Advisors/Committee Members: James O. Hammons, Karen Hodges, Carleton Holt.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; AASCU; Acclimation; Executive transitions; Lessons learned; Public higher education; University presidents; Educational Leadership; Higher Education Administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kinders, M. A. (2015). The Acclimation Processes for New, First-time Presidents at Public, Master’s-level Comprehensive Institutions: Lessons Learned. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1223

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kinders, Mark Allan. “The Acclimation Processes for New, First-time Presidents at Public, Master’s-level Comprehensive Institutions: Lessons Learned.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed February 19, 2019. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1223.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kinders, Mark Allan. “The Acclimation Processes for New, First-time Presidents at Public, Master’s-level Comprehensive Institutions: Lessons Learned.” 2015. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Kinders MA. The Acclimation Processes for New, First-time Presidents at Public, Master’s-level Comprehensive Institutions: Lessons Learned. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1223.

Council of Science Editors:

Kinders MA. The Acclimation Processes for New, First-time Presidents at Public, Master’s-level Comprehensive Institutions: Lessons Learned. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2015. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1223

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