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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Fabio Mendez"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Reber, Jared David. Essays on the Changing Nature of Business Cycle Fluctuations: A State-Level Study of Jobless Recoveries and the Great Moderation.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Arkansas

The behavior of several important macroeconomic variables has changed dramatically over the past several business cycles in the U.S. These changes, which began around the mid-1980s, have been viewed as somewhat puzzling given the stark contrast they exhibit to earlier post-war data. The movement of output and employment has historically been highly correlated throughout the different phases of the business cycle. However, this changed with the economic recovery of 1991. Since then, periods of output recovery have been accompanied by periods of prolonged job loss. These periods have come to be known as "jobless recoveries". Several competing explanations for this phenomenon have come forth, however, all face similar limitations. To date, there has been no method presented to quantify a period of jobless recovery. This makes comparisons across business cycles difficult and also prevents formal statistical testing of the proposed explanations. This study creates a meaningful measure of a jobless recovery which can be used to test these hypotheses. Furthermore, jobless recoveries have only been studied using the national aggregate data. This neglects potentially valuable information which may exist in the cross-section between states. Using the jobless recovery measure, a state-level empirical analysis is conducted to determine which, if any, of the existing explanations of jobless recoveries are supported by the data. It has also been noted that the growth of output has experienced dramatic changes over roughly the same period. The broad decline in the volatility of output since the mid-1980s, named the Great Moderation, has become the subject of a large literature. However, the literature has examined mostly data at the national-level. Using a proxy of quarterly output, this paper provides state-level evidence of the Great Moderation and shows that large, cross-state differences exist in the degree to which each state experiences the Great Moderation. Explanations for why the Great Moderation exists in the national data are examined to see how well they explain the observed cross-state differences in the evolution of output volatility. Advisors/Committee Members: Fabio Mendez, Jingping Gu, Andrea Civelli.

Subjects/Keywords: Macroeconomics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reber, J. D. (2014). Essays on the Changing Nature of Business Cycle Fluctuations: A State-Level Study of Jobless Recoveries and the Great Moderation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2291

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reber, Jared David. “Essays on the Changing Nature of Business Cycle Fluctuations: A State-Level Study of Jobless Recoveries and the Great Moderation.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed October 29, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2291.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reber, Jared David. “Essays on the Changing Nature of Business Cycle Fluctuations: A State-Level Study of Jobless Recoveries and the Great Moderation.” 2014. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Reber JD. Essays on the Changing Nature of Business Cycle Fluctuations: A State-Level Study of Jobless Recoveries and the Great Moderation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2291.

Council of Science Editors:

Reber JD. Essays on the Changing Nature of Business Cycle Fluctuations: A State-Level Study of Jobless Recoveries and the Great Moderation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2291


University of Arkansas

2. Zhu, Zhen. Essays in Economic Growth and Development.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Arkansas

This dissertation consists of three chapters exploring the Solow Residual of the Solow growth model. Two central components of the Solow Residual have been studied in my doctoral dissertation. The first is the structural transformation, an internal adjustment process that helps the economy attain the optimal points on its Production Possibility Frontier by reallocating resources from the low-productivity sectors to the high-productivity sectors. The second is the technology diffusion, a positive externality process that pushes forward the economy's Production Possibility Frontier if it adopts the newer technology. The first chapter of my dissertation is devoted to a case study of China's structural transformation. As one of the fastest growing economies in the world, China has observed dramatic reallocation of resources from the agricultural sector to the nonagricultural sector over the last three decades. This chapter proposes a two-sector growth model and identifies three driving forces for China's structural transformation. Most importantly, the migration costs can be shown as a significant barrier to the reallocation process after I calibrate the model with real data. The second and the third chapters of my dissertation are devoted to the study of the technology diffusion. The second chapter is a collaborative effort with Gary Ferrier and Javier Reyes. We approach the cross-country technology diffusion from a novel perspective - the trade network can be viewed as the conduit of the technology diffusion. The question we ask is whether the trade network structure matters in the technology diffusion process. We consider 24 major technologies over the period from 1962 to 2000 and find that, in most cases, there is strong and robust evidence to suggest that the better-connected countries on the trade network tend to adopt or assimilate newer and more advanced technologies faster. However, the better-connected countries tend to have lower technology intensity if the technology has become obsolete. Finally, the third chapter is a theoretical approach to the technology diffusion. In particular, the technology diffusion across countries can be generalized as a learning process on networks. Based on a stylized learning model, this chapter examines the impact of the network structures on the speed of the diffusion process. Advisors/Committee Members: Javier A. Reyes, Gary D. Ferrier, Fabio Mendez.

Subjects/Keywords: Social sciences; Economic growth and development; International trade; Networks; Structural transformation; Technology diffusion; Growth and Development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhu, Z. (2013). Essays in Economic Growth and Development. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/839

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhu, Zhen. “Essays in Economic Growth and Development.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed October 29, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/839.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhu, Zhen. “Essays in Economic Growth and Development.” 2013. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhu Z. Essays in Economic Growth and Development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/839.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhu Z. Essays in Economic Growth and Development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2013. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/839

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