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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Elizabeth Kegley"). Showing records 1 – 7 of 7 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Pickett, Autumn Tayler. Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture.

Degree: MS, 2020, University of Arkansas

  Cattle grazing wheat pasture have the potential to gain BW exceptionally well, but excessive nitrogen intake results in increased excretion and increased greenhouse gas… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cattle; Greenhouse gases; Methane; Nutrition; Production; Animal Experimentation and Research; Animal Studies; Beef Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Pickett, A. T. (2020). Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pickett, Autumn Tayler. “Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pickett, Autumn Tayler. “Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture.” 2020. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Pickett AT. Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627.

Council of Science Editors:

Pickett AT. Effects of Lasalocid and Energy Supplementation on Forage Intake, Energy Metabolism, and Performance of Cattle Grazing Wheat Pasture. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3627


University of Arkansas

2. Palmer, Elizabeth. Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production.

Degree: MS, 2018, University of Arkansas

  Supplemental dietary yeast products are beneficial during times of stress. Calves experience increased levels of stress during birth, weaning, and the post-weaning receiving period.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Beef Cattle; Health; Yeast; Beef Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Palmer, E. (2018). Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Palmer, Elizabeth. “Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Palmer, Elizabeth. “Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production.” 2018. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Palmer E. Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918.

Council of Science Editors:

Palmer E. Effect of Yeast Supplementation During Various Stages of Beef Production. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2918


University of Arkansas

3. Knapp, Joshua Paul. The Effects of Super-dosing Phytase on Nursery and Grower Pigs.

Degree: MS, 2018, University of Arkansas

  To determine the effects of super-dosing on pigs fed phosphorous and calcium adequate or deficient diets (Experiment 1); the optimum level of corn express… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Nursery Pigs; Phytase; Animal Studies; Other Animal Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Knapp, J. P. (2018). The Effects of Super-dosing Phytase on Nursery and Grower Pigs. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2940

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knapp, Joshua Paul. “The Effects of Super-dosing Phytase on Nursery and Grower Pigs.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2940.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knapp, Joshua Paul. “The Effects of Super-dosing Phytase on Nursery and Grower Pigs.” 2018. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Knapp JP. The Effects of Super-dosing Phytase on Nursery and Grower Pigs. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2940.

Council of Science Editors:

Knapp JP. The Effects of Super-dosing Phytase on Nursery and Grower Pigs. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2940


University of Arkansas

4. Althaber, Colton Allen. Effects of 50:50 proportion Bull:Cow Blend Levels and Incorporation of Finely Textured Beef on the Color of Precooked Ground Beef Patties.

Degree: MS, 2019, University of Arkansas

  Variation in internal cooked color of ground beef is an economic concern for the ground beef market. Persistent pink color in hamburger patties can… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Consumer Sensory Panel; Cookery Method; Fat Content; Finely Textured Beef; Ground Beef; Precooked Burger Patties; Beef Science; Food Processing; Meat Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Althaber, C. A. (2019). Effects of 50:50 proportion Bull:Cow Blend Levels and Incorporation of Finely Textured Beef on the Color of Precooked Ground Beef Patties. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3505

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Althaber, Colton Allen. “Effects of 50:50 proportion Bull:Cow Blend Levels and Incorporation of Finely Textured Beef on the Color of Precooked Ground Beef Patties.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3505.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Althaber, Colton Allen. “Effects of 50:50 proportion Bull:Cow Blend Levels and Incorporation of Finely Textured Beef on the Color of Precooked Ground Beef Patties.” 2019. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Althaber CA. Effects of 50:50 proportion Bull:Cow Blend Levels and Incorporation of Finely Textured Beef on the Color of Precooked Ground Beef Patties. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3505.

Council of Science Editors:

Althaber CA. Effects of 50:50 proportion Bull:Cow Blend Levels and Incorporation of Finely Textured Beef on the Color of Precooked Ground Beef Patties. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3505


University of Arkansas

5. Ryan, Anthony. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.

Degree: MS, 2014, University of Arkansas

  A series of studies were conducted to determine the effect of supplemental trace mineral source on growth performance, morbidity, and trace mineral status in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Beef Cattle; Trace Minerals; Meat Science; Other Animal Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Ryan, A. (2014). Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ryan, Anthony. “Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ryan, Anthony. “Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ryan A. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151.

Council of Science Editors:

Ryan A. Effect of Supplemental Trace Mineral (Zinc, Copper, and Manganese) Source on Growth Performance, Morbidity, and Trace Mineral Status in Beef Cattle. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2151


University of Arkansas

6. Smith, William Brandon. Effect of Limit-Fed Co-Product Feedstuffs on Production, Digestion, Fermentation and Rumen Function in Beef Cattle.

Degree: MS, 2014, University of Arkansas

  In terms of energy density, the cost of shipping hay is often not justified in yr where adverse conditions limit available forage. Our objective… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Co-product Feedstuffs; Distiller's Grains; Limit-feeding; Rumen Function; Rumen Recovery; Soybean Hulls; Food Processing; Meat Science; Nutrition

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APA (6th Edition):

Smith, W. B. (2014). Effect of Limit-Fed Co-Product Feedstuffs on Production, Digestion, Fermentation and Rumen Function in Beef Cattle. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2358

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, William Brandon. “Effect of Limit-Fed Co-Product Feedstuffs on Production, Digestion, Fermentation and Rumen Function in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2358.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, William Brandon. “Effect of Limit-Fed Co-Product Feedstuffs on Production, Digestion, Fermentation and Rumen Function in Beef Cattle.” 2014. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Smith WB. Effect of Limit-Fed Co-Product Feedstuffs on Production, Digestion, Fermentation and Rumen Function in Beef Cattle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2358.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith WB. Effect of Limit-Fed Co-Product Feedstuffs on Production, Digestion, Fermentation and Rumen Function in Beef Cattle. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2358


University of Arkansas

7. Ball, Jase Joseph. Zinc Injection as a Novel Castration Method and Carry-Over Effects of Growth-Promoting Implants in Beef Cattle.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Arkansas

  In experiment 1, crossbred bull calves (n = 31; body weight (BW) = 114.3 ± 26.3 kg; age = 119 ± 18.4 d) were… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Beef Calves; Castration; Growth-promoting Implants; Zinc; Animal Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Ball, J. J. (2018). Zinc Injection as a Novel Castration Method and Carry-Over Effects of Growth-Promoting Implants in Beef Cattle. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2677

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ball, Jase Joseph. “Zinc Injection as a Novel Castration Method and Carry-Over Effects of Growth-Promoting Implants in Beef Cattle.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2677.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ball, Jase Joseph. “Zinc Injection as a Novel Castration Method and Carry-Over Effects of Growth-Promoting Implants in Beef Cattle.” 2018. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ball JJ. Zinc Injection as a Novel Castration Method and Carry-Over Effects of Growth-Promoting Implants in Beef Cattle. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2677.

Council of Science Editors:

Ball JJ. Zinc Injection as a Novel Castration Method and Carry-Over Effects of Growth-Promoting Implants in Beef Cattle. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2677

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