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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Charles F. Robinson, II"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Courage-Mellott, Angela. The Interethnic Communication Apprehension of Students of Color at the University of Arkansas.

Degree: Doctor of Education in Higher Education (EdD), Higher Education (EdD), 2014, University of Arkansas

Interethnic Communication Apprehension of students of color with white faculty members was studied at the University of Arkansas, a predominantly white university with predominantly white faculty. Interethnic Communication Apprehension is defined as a psychological response of fear or anxiety which causes avoidance of interaction with people from ethnic groups that are different from one's own (Neuliep & McCroskey, 1997). This study was conducted using the PRECA (Personal Report of Interethnic Communication Apprehension) measure created and validated by Neuliep and McCroskey (1997). Students of color who frequent the Center of Multicultural and Diversity Education were polled using the PRECA. Students of all categories including ethnicity, sex, and grade level reported low mean scores on Interethnic Communication Apprehension. However, significant issues of concern were articulated in open ended responses which indicate that though the construct labeled Interethnic Communication Apprehension (ICA) may be low, other areas of tension and communication dissatisfaction exist. Other variables such as Attractiveness of Majority faculty and Asymmetrical Power Dynamics between faculty and students of color should be examined. Students expressed need for increased inclusion; culturally relevant event programming; the salience of culture with desire for improved understanding of members of different groups; communication quality, quantity and /bold>access between ethnic groups; dissatisfaction or negative experiences at the University; faculty and staff roles; and finally, sensitivity and training of faculty and students when relating to people of color. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael T. Miller, Charles F. Robinson, II, Adam A. Morris.

Subjects/Keywords: Apprehension; Communication; Interethnic; Interracial; Race; Student; African American Studies; Ethnic Studies; Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication; Higher Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Courage-Mellott, A. (2014). The Interethnic Communication Apprehension of Students of Color at the University of Arkansas. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2277

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Courage-Mellott, Angela. “The Interethnic Communication Apprehension of Students of Color at the University of Arkansas.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed August 25, 2019. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2277.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Courage-Mellott, Angela. “The Interethnic Communication Apprehension of Students of Color at the University of Arkansas.” 2014. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Courage-Mellott A. The Interethnic Communication Apprehension of Students of Color at the University of Arkansas. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2277.

Council of Science Editors:

Courage-Mellott A. The Interethnic Communication Apprehension of Students of Color at the University of Arkansas. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2277


University of Arkansas

2. Hui, Mary Margaret. Factors Contributing to the Success of First-Generation College Students at a Research University.

Degree: Doctor of Education in Higher Education (EdD), Higher Education (EdD), 2017, University of Arkansas

First-generation college students are students whose parents do not have a college degree, and they face numerous barriers in college. Yet, several first-generation college students (FGCS) are successful and are on-track to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in four years. Their success is important because education is associated with increased income, quality of life, and social mobility, making educational attainment even more significant in Arkansas, which has both low educational attainment and high poverty. Little is known about what can be done to close the achievement gap. It is important to analyze what helped FGCS succeed so that higher education administrators, faculty, and staff can help other FGCS succeed. The study used explanatory sequential mixed methodology to analyze the factors first-generation college students identified as contributing toward being on-track to graduate in four years. Data for the study were collected at the University of Arkansas, an Arkansas land-grant institution. Descriptive statistics and Pearson’s chi-square of independence test were used to analyze first-generation students. Focus groups of FGCS were conducted to understand the factors that contributed to being on-track and strategies for success. The study’s results indicated that ethnicity and changing the major college of degree program are not related to being on-track to graduate, but other demographic factors like age, residency, and ACT score are significant. FGCS faced multiple barriers like unpreparedness, financial obligations, and relating to their family members, but they were motivated to succeed by many factors, primarily believing that a college degree was necessary for a better life. They used a few strategies to succeed, such as active involvement in planning their course of study to maximize efficiency. Recommendations for both future research and future practice were made to help first-generation college students succeed. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael T. Miller, Trevor A. Francis, Charles F. Robinson II.

Subjects/Keywords: First-generation College Students; Higher Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hui, M. M. (2017). Factors Contributing to the Success of First-Generation College Students at a Research University. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2420

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hui, Mary Margaret. “Factors Contributing to the Success of First-Generation College Students at a Research University.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed August 25, 2019. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2420.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hui, Mary Margaret. “Factors Contributing to the Success of First-Generation College Students at a Research University.” 2017. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Hui MM. Factors Contributing to the Success of First-Generation College Students at a Research University. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2017. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2420.

Council of Science Editors:

Hui MM. Factors Contributing to the Success of First-Generation College Students at a Research University. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2420

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