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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Caree Banton"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Ownbey, Samuel Morris. 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership.

Degree: MA, 2020, University of Arkansas

This thesis examines the systematic dispossession of African American property by white planters in the Arkansas Delta. It argues white planters, backed by a legal system favorable to their interests, expropriated the black land in the once flourishing community of Edmondson, Arkansas. Founded in 1902 by African American business and political leaders, the Edmondson Home and Improvement Company purchased farmland and town lots and began to sell or rent the land to African Americans coming to the area. Located in Crittenden County, Edmondson represented black defiance in the face of Jim Crow laws and white supremacy. The town consisted of black-owned businesses financially supported by the productive cotton-growing soil that surrounded the town. However, the Great Depression lowered the price of cotton, and the town fell into decline. By the mid-1930s, New Deal programs, particularly the Agricultural Adjustment Agency, revitalized the cotton industry, making the land in Edmondson coveted by the dominant white planters. During this time, a white man named Weaver acquired a town lot through an African American agent working on his behalf. The arrival of the first white landowner in Edmondson set in motion a conspiracy to take the land from African Americans and place it under white planter control. By 1941, Weaver had acquired nearly 600 town lots and was collecting rent from the original owners. Left economically devastated and under the control of white planters, the black people of Edmondson had no resources to contest the loss of their land. When the Southern Tenant Farmers Union arrived in Edmondson in 1936, it used its connections to fund a civil suit against Weaver in which they alleged that Weaver’s acquisition was part of a conspiracy to wipe out the last independent black community in Crittenden County. The people claimed that the sheriff and tax collector of Crittenden County had declared their land delinquent for failure to pay a tax that he had not properly levied against them. Having declared the lands delinquent, the sheriff then sold the lands to the State of Arkansas. The state then conveyed the land to Weaver, leaving him virtually the sole proprietor of Edmondson. The civil suit lasted from 1941 to 1949 when a Crittenden County judge dismissed the suit without a trial, and the people of Edmondson never reclaimed their property. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Pierce, Caree Banton, Patrick Williams.

Subjects/Keywords: African Americans; Agriculture; Arkansas delta; Crittenden County; Edmondson; Landownership; African American Studies; American Politics; Cultural History; Race and Ethnicity; Rural Sociology; United States History

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APA (6th Edition):

Ownbey, S. M. (2020). 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ownbey, Samuel Morris. “'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 02, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ownbey, Samuel Morris. “'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership.” 2020. Web. 02 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Ownbey SM. 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 02]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702.

Council of Science Editors:

Ownbey SM. 'The once peaceful little town:' Edmondson, Arkansas, and the Decline of African American Landownership. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2020. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3702


University of Arkansas

2. Moulton, Aaron Coy. Guatemalan Exiles, Caribbean Basin Dictators, Operation PBFORTUNE, and the Transnational Counter-Revolution against the Guatemalan Revolution, 1944-1952.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Arkansas

When U.S. officials in 1952 approved the first Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) operation to overthrow Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, they unknowingly stepped into a regional conflict that, for nearly ten years, included dissident Guatemalan exiles, Caribbean Basin dictators, and the Guatemalan governments of Arbenz and his predecessor Juan José Arévalo. Since the mid-1940s, exiles and dictators had denounced the Guatemalan Revolution as the product of Mexican, Soviet, and international communism. The anti-communist ideology of Guatemalan exiles, Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza, Honduran dictator Tiburcio Carías, and Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo facilitated various conspiracies aimed to destabilize Arévalo and Arbenz’s governments throughout the 1940s. For their own reasons, a network of exiles and dictators put into motion a counter-revolution that included subversive ventures and self-proclaimed anti-communists who became patrons for colonel Carlos Castillo Armas in the early 1950s. In 1952, it was this network’s intelligence-sharing and lobbying of U.S. officials that built the foundation of Operation PBFORTUNE. The CIA’s involvement and resources bolstered regional support for Castillo Armas’s plot, thereby radicalizing the network’s dynamics and size. However, the State Department and Agency’s unfamiliarity with the network’s history led to the conspiracy’s abrupt termination while U.S. officials paternalistically blamed the ‘latinos’ for Operation PBFORTUNE’s end. Advisors/Committee Members: Alessandro Brogi, Kathryn Sloan, Caree Banton.

Subjects/Keywords: Social sciences; Central intelligence agency; Coldd War; Dictators; Exiles; Guatemala; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moulton, A. C. (2016). Guatemalan Exiles, Caribbean Basin Dictators, Operation PBFORTUNE, and the Transnational Counter-Revolution against the Guatemalan Revolution, 1944-1952. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1533

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moulton, Aaron Coy. “Guatemalan Exiles, Caribbean Basin Dictators, Operation PBFORTUNE, and the Transnational Counter-Revolution against the Guatemalan Revolution, 1944-1952.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 02, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1533.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moulton, Aaron Coy. “Guatemalan Exiles, Caribbean Basin Dictators, Operation PBFORTUNE, and the Transnational Counter-Revolution against the Guatemalan Revolution, 1944-1952.” 2016. Web. 02 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Moulton AC. Guatemalan Exiles, Caribbean Basin Dictators, Operation PBFORTUNE, and the Transnational Counter-Revolution against the Guatemalan Revolution, 1944-1952. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 02]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1533.

Council of Science Editors:

Moulton AC. Guatemalan Exiles, Caribbean Basin Dictators, Operation PBFORTUNE, and the Transnational Counter-Revolution against the Guatemalan Revolution, 1944-1952. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1533


University of Arkansas

3. Conley, Nathaniel. Frontier Capitalism and Unfree Labor in Middle Appalachia: The Development of Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1760-1840.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Arkansas

Slavery and unfree labor have been a subject of growing interest for historians, particularly when dealing with frontier areas and the rise of capitalism. Recent studies have shown that slavery and unfree labor existed well into the antebellum period in the North despite the lack of legal support for the institution. Few historians have identified the importance of slavery in the development of western areas, however, particularly in the Appalachian regions of western Pennsylvania and Maryland. As a result, concerted study of slavery in rural, western areas is lacking, particularly in the borderland region between slavery and freedom along the Mason-Dixon Line in the western areas of Pennsylvania and Maryland. “Frontier Capitalism and Unfree Labor in Appalachia: The Development of Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1780-1840” remedies this gap by examining this border region, analyzing how various labor systems (slave, free, term slave) affected the development of capitalism and how wider debates over slavery and freedom affected that development. The period covered is one in which this region underwent dramatic social and economic change, beginning with concerted settlement efforts after the Revolution and the rapid development of a developed economy, stratified society, and hardening racial thought. Beginning in 1780 with the passage of the gradual emancipation act in Pennsylvania, this region was divided by an artificial, political border between slavery and freedom. In theory Pennsylvania developed into a free state but in practice, unfree labor forms existed well into the antebellum period. The Maryland side of this region developed along the same path, quick economic development, social stratification, and hardening racial thought. What is most evident, however, is the quick growth of slavery in this region of the state, despite contrary trends elsewhere in Maryland and the proximity to the border with Pennsylvania. Indeed, sales of unfree laborers (primarily African Americans), fugitive slaves, and the tensions of being close to the border effected social, political, and racial development on both sides. Advisors/Committee Members: James Gigantino, Calvin White, Caree Banton.

Subjects/Keywords: Appalachia; Capitalism; Early Republic; Labor; Slavery; Labor History; United States History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Conley, N. (2018). Frontier Capitalism and Unfree Labor in Middle Appalachia: The Development of Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1760-1840. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2633

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Conley, Nathaniel. “Frontier Capitalism and Unfree Labor in Middle Appalachia: The Development of Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1760-1840.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 02, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2633.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Conley, Nathaniel. “Frontier Capitalism and Unfree Labor in Middle Appalachia: The Development of Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1760-1840.” 2018. Web. 02 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Conley N. Frontier Capitalism and Unfree Labor in Middle Appalachia: The Development of Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1760-1840. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2018. [cited 2020 Dec 02]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2633.

Council of Science Editors:

Conley N. Frontier Capitalism and Unfree Labor in Middle Appalachia: The Development of Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1760-1840. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2633

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