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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arkansas" +contributor:("Beth Schweiger"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Dicks, Laura Leighann. The Influence of Literacy on the Lives of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures.

Degree: MA, 2014, University of Arkansas

  The American South has long been a region associated with myth and fantasy; in popular culture especially, the region is consistently tied to skewed… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American; Discourse; Literacy; Literature; Reading; Writing; African American Studies; American Literature; Literature in English, North America, Ethnic and Cultural Minority; Women's Studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Dicks, L. L. (2014). The Influence of Literacy on the Lives of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2225

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dicks, Laura Leighann. “The Influence of Literacy on the Lives of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2225.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dicks, Laura Leighann. “The Influence of Literacy on the Lives of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures.” 2014. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Dicks LL. The Influence of Literacy on the Lives of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2225.

Council of Science Editors:

Dicks LL. The Influence of Literacy on the Lives of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2225


University of Arkansas

2. Gordon, Ronald James. "The Claims of Religion Upon Medical Men": Protestant Christianity and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Arkansas

  This is the first study to examine how pastors lost authority over bodily healing in the nineteenth century. I argue that clergymen adapted to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: History of Religion; History of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Medicine and Health Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Gordon, R. J. (2014). "The Claims of Religion Upon Medical Men": Protestant Christianity and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2268

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gordon, Ronald James. “"The Claims of Religion Upon Medical Men": Protestant Christianity and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2268.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gordon, Ronald James. “"The Claims of Religion Upon Medical Men": Protestant Christianity and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America.” 2014. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Gordon RJ. "The Claims of Religion Upon Medical Men": Protestant Christianity and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2268.

Council of Science Editors:

Gordon RJ. "The Claims of Religion Upon Medical Men": Protestant Christianity and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2268


University of Arkansas

3. Hodge, Chelsea. "A Song Workers Everywhere Sing:" Zilphia Horton and the Creation of Labor's Musical Canon.

Degree: MA, 2014, University of Arkansas

  Zilphia Horton, a college educated, middle class white woman from the rural American south, created the canon of music that would become central to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: 20th Century United States; Labor; United States South; Musicology; Politics and Social Change; United States History

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APA (6th Edition):

Hodge, C. (2014). "A Song Workers Everywhere Sing:" Zilphia Horton and the Creation of Labor's Musical Canon. (Masters Thesis). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2328

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hodge, Chelsea. “"A Song Workers Everywhere Sing:" Zilphia Horton and the Creation of Labor's Musical Canon.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2328.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hodge, Chelsea. “"A Song Workers Everywhere Sing:" Zilphia Horton and the Creation of Labor's Musical Canon.” 2014. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Hodge C. "A Song Workers Everywhere Sing:" Zilphia Horton and the Creation of Labor's Musical Canon. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2328.

Council of Science Editors:

Hodge C. "A Song Workers Everywhere Sing:" Zilphia Horton and the Creation of Labor's Musical Canon. [Masters Thesis]. University of Arkansas; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2328


University of Arkansas

4. Treat, John D. Initiating Race: Fraternal Organizations, Racial Identity, and Public Discourse in American Culture, 1865-1917.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Arkansas

  Drawing on ritual books, organizational records, newspaper accounts, and the data available from cemetery headstones and census records, this work argues that adult fraternal… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Philosophy; religion and theology; Social sciences; African-American organizations; Afrocentrism; Civic discourse; Fraternal organizations; Racial identity; African American Studies; Cultural History; History of Religion; United States History

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APA (6th Edition):

Treat, J. D. (2016). Initiating Race: Fraternal Organizations, Racial Identity, and Public Discourse in American Culture, 1865-1917. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1773

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Treat, John D. “Initiating Race: Fraternal Organizations, Racial Identity, and Public Discourse in American Culture, 1865-1917.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1773.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Treat, John D. “Initiating Race: Fraternal Organizations, Racial Identity, and Public Discourse in American Culture, 1865-1917.” 2016. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Treat JD. Initiating Race: Fraternal Organizations, Racial Identity, and Public Discourse in American Culture, 1865-1917. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1773.

Council of Science Editors:

Treat JD. Initiating Race: Fraternal Organizations, Racial Identity, and Public Discourse in American Culture, 1865-1917. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/1773


University of Arkansas

5. Hancox, Louise Michelle. Picturing a Nation Divided: Art, American Identity and the Crisis over Slavery.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Arkansas

  In 1859, Arkansas artist Edward Payson Washbourne produced a lithograph entitled the Arkansas Traveler. Based upon a popular folktale originating twenty years earlier, Washbourne… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Arkansas; Art; Cherokees; Indians; Settlers; Slavery; Indigenous Studies; United States History

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APA (6th Edition):

Hancox, L. M. (2018). Picturing a Nation Divided: Art, American Identity and the Crisis over Slavery. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2768

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hancox, Louise Michelle. “Picturing a Nation Divided: Art, American Identity and the Crisis over Slavery.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2768.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hancox, Louise Michelle. “Picturing a Nation Divided: Art, American Identity and the Crisis over Slavery.” 2018. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Hancox LM. Picturing a Nation Divided: Art, American Identity and the Crisis over Slavery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2018. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2768.

Council of Science Editors:

Hancox LM. Picturing a Nation Divided: Art, American Identity and the Crisis over Slavery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/2768


University of Arkansas

6. Hodge, Chelsea. “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939.

Degree: PhD, 2020, University of Arkansas

  Over the course of three decades, white southern Methodist women took on issues of labor and poverty through their national women’s organization, the Woman’s… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Activism; Civil Rights; Methodist; New Deal; South; Women; Christian Denominations and Sects; History of Religion; New Religious Movements; Politics and Social Change; Social Welfare; United States History; Women's History; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hodge, C. (2020). “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hodge, Chelsea. ““Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hodge, Chelsea. ““Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939.” 2020. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Hodge C. “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752.

Council of Science Editors:

Hodge C. “Deserting the broad and easy way”: Southern Methodist Women, the Social Gospel, and the New Deal State, 1909-1939. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2020. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/3752

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