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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arizona" +contributor:("da Silva Iddings, Ana Christina"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arizona

1. Lemus, Linda. Portraits of Multilinguals on Social Network Sites: Identity Negotiation and Language Use .

Degree: 2018, University of Arizona

This research examines the multilingual experiences of university Spanish and Portuguese language learning students, all of whom participate on social network sites (SNSs). This longitudinal study is primarily comprised of data collected from Facebook from each student's last semester in high school through their penultimate college semester. These case studies produced portraits through the review of an initial questionnaire, interviews, Facebook and other social media data using discourse-centered online ethnography (Androutsopoulos, 2008). An ethnographic case study methodology is practiced to present, describe and analyze how these university students negotiate their identity through translanguaging practices (García, 2009; Li, 2017) and their communities of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Wenger, 1998). This qualitative study asks: How do these three language learners of English-Spanish-Portuguese (2 heritage language and 1 second language Spanish; 3 third language Portuguese) use their languages on their social media such as the SNS Facebook? What are the roles of sociolinguistic agency, place and communities of practice in students’ language choices? Do students make space for the languages to coexist (translanguaging practices) in their shared posts? My research expands our understanding of heritage, second and third language students’ language practices and offers an examination of these students negotiating their experiences within their SNSs. Few studies have researched language practices and identity of university students, especially of heritage language learners, on SNSs. Looking beyond language learning and SNSs in the classroom, this study explores the role that social participation plays in the language learning process (see Wenger, 1998) and looks at how the three students use their languages and agency to participate in online SNSs and navigate their spaces. This research offers an in-depth look at the importance of place and community in the negotiation of translingual identities and takes into consideration places such as the classroom, social media, and study abroad. It also takes into account the importance of social networks on identity construction to better understand the language practices of university students. This research moves from the how-to use SNSs in language learning to what practices language learners take part in their everyday language and SNSs use. The aim of the study is to better inform our language classroom practices and lessen the disconnect between what university educators suggest doing and what students would actually do on SNSs. The value of reducing this disconnect is to engage students to use their second and third languages in their everyday lives. Advisors/Committee Members: da Silva Iddings, Ana Christina (advisor), Carvalho, Ana Maria (advisor), Fernández, Julieta (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Identity; L2 & L3 Language Acquisition; Language Learning; Multilingual; Social Networks; Translanguaging

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lemus, L. (2018). Portraits of Multilinguals on Social Network Sites: Identity Negotiation and Language Use . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/630196

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lemus, Linda. “Portraits of Multilinguals on Social Network Sites: Identity Negotiation and Language Use .” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/630196.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lemus, Linda. “Portraits of Multilinguals on Social Network Sites: Identity Negotiation and Language Use .” 2018. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Lemus L. Portraits of Multilinguals on Social Network Sites: Identity Negotiation and Language Use . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/630196.

Council of Science Editors:

Lemus L. Portraits of Multilinguals on Social Network Sites: Identity Negotiation and Language Use . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/630196


University of Arizona

2. Robbins, Sheri. Translating Theoretical Principles to Classroom Practice .

Degree: 2017, University of Arizona

This study followed two teacher candidates from the Communities as Resources in Early Childhood Teacher Education (CREATE) project into their first year classrooms to determine whether they were able to translate the theoretical principles from their teacher preparation program into practice during their first year of teaching. It also examined the supporting and limiting contextual factors that affected translation both during their teacher preparation and in their first year of teaching. Multiple case study methodology was used to look closely at each case independently providing consistency through replication, while also allowing the ability to look across both cases to develop more powerful findings (Stake, 2006; Baxter & Jack, 2008; Yin, 2014). A conceptual frame was developed around translation, revisiting how it has been used in other fields of research in the past (Catford, 1974; Bassnett, 2013; Major & Cordey-Hayes, 2000; Holden & Von Kortzfleisch, 2004; Jacobson, Butterill & Goering, 2003; Davison, 2009; Straus, Tetroe, & Graham, 2009) and how it is currently being used as a metaphor in the field of education (Cook-Sather, 2001, 2006) to provide a lens into the intricacies and flexibility of the process of translation. Literature was reviewed to provide background into research that has looked closely at the impact teacher preparation programs have on the first year of teaching, and to provide background information into the conceptualization of the work undergirding the principles of CREATE. It is crucial for teacher preparation programs to follow their own graduates into their classrooms to gain a deeper understanding of what concepts, theories, and principles translated from university classrooms and field experiences to practice in first year teacher's classrooms, in order to make changes to their teacher education curriculum to prevent a breakdown of translation. This study offers insight into what supports and limits translation and offers suggestions for future research in the area of translation. Advisors/Committee Members: Clift, Renée T (advisor), Clift, Renée T. (committeemember), Short, Kathy G. (committeemember), da Silva Iddings, Ana Christina (committeemember), Jurich, Donna L. (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: first year teachers; teacher candidates; teacher preparation; translation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Robbins, S. (2017). Translating Theoretical Principles to Classroom Practice . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625843

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robbins, Sheri. “Translating Theoretical Principles to Classroom Practice .” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625843.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robbins, Sheri. “Translating Theoretical Principles to Classroom Practice .” 2017. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Robbins S. Translating Theoretical Principles to Classroom Practice . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625843.

Council of Science Editors:

Robbins S. Translating Theoretical Principles to Classroom Practice . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625843

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