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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arizona" +contributor:("Segrin, Chris G"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arizona

1. Swiatkowski, Paulina. Reality TV, Relational Aggression, And Romance: The Effects of Reality Show Viewing On Relational Aggression and Relational Quality in Romantic Relationships .

Degree: 2018, University of Arizona

Reality shows remain a prominent genre of today’s media culture. More importantly, plot lines tend to be dominated by interpersonal relationship trajectories, which often include conflict such as relational aggression (Coyne, Robins, & Nelson, 2010). When relational aggression is included in analyses that compare the content of scripted and reality shows, researchers find that aggression is more likely to occur in reality shows than scripted shows (Coyne et al., 2010). Furthermore, reality shows are often described as “unscripted,” portraying “real” people during their “ordinary” days (Riddle & De Simone, 2013). Relational aggression is link to physical violence and other poor social and psychological effects (e.g., Caetano, Vaeth, & Ramisetty-Mikler, 2008; Linder, Crick, & Collins, 2002) and, therefore, needs better understanding. Therefore, the present study’s theoretical foundation in cultivation theory, theory of reasoned action, social cognitive theory, and social comparison theory sought to understand how reality shows influence adult viewers and their perceptions and behaviors within romantic relationships. Four-week longitudinal data from 117 dyads was analyzed for potential media effects and how those effects could influence relational aggression within relationships and relational quality. The results suggest minimal media effects but do support negative longitudinal effects of relational aggression on relational quality. Limitations and future directions are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Segrin, Chris G (advisor), Segrin, Chris G. (committeemember), Stevens Aubrey, Jennifer L. (committeemember), Bonito, Joseph A. (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: cultivation theory; reality television; relational aggression; relational commitment; relational satisfaction; social comparison theory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Swiatkowski, P. (2018). Reality TV, Relational Aggression, And Romance: The Effects of Reality Show Viewing On Relational Aggression and Relational Quality in Romantic Relationships . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/626679

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swiatkowski, Paulina. “Reality TV, Relational Aggression, And Romance: The Effects of Reality Show Viewing On Relational Aggression and Relational Quality in Romantic Relationships .” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed July 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/626679.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swiatkowski, Paulina. “Reality TV, Relational Aggression, And Romance: The Effects of Reality Show Viewing On Relational Aggression and Relational Quality in Romantic Relationships .” 2018. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Swiatkowski P. Reality TV, Relational Aggression, And Romance: The Effects of Reality Show Viewing On Relational Aggression and Relational Quality in Romantic Relationships . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2018. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/626679.

Council of Science Editors:

Swiatkowski P. Reality TV, Relational Aggression, And Romance: The Effects of Reality Show Viewing On Relational Aggression and Relational Quality in Romantic Relationships . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/626679


University of Arizona

2. Taylor, Melissa. Young Adult Perceptions of Egalitarianism in their Families of Origin: An Examination of Conflict Style, Locus of Control, and Psychological Distress in Young Adult Relationships .

Degree: 2005, University of Arizona

This study addressed the possible change in young adult attitudes toward family dynamics due to the shift from traditionalism to egalitarianism in recent decades. More specifically, it sought to explore young adult perceptions' of their parents' relational ideology (e.g., degree of traditionalism), and whether young adults perceived their relational ideology to be similar to their parents' ideology. It was predicted that high levels of traditionalism in young adults would be associated with low levels of relational efficacy, as defined by conflict styles and feelings of internal control over relationships. Social cognitive theory (Bandura, 2001) posits that children learn behavior modeled by parents, particularly behaviors that are rewarded. Hence, with the increase in more egalitarian attitudes modeled by parents, this study sought to determine the extent to which young adults are now acquiring and implementing primarily egalitarian rather than traditional attitudes. A path analysis revealed significant associations between parents' degree of traditionalism and offspring traditionalism, as well as significant associations between parents' degree of traditionalism and their distributive and integrative conflict styles. Further, young adult conflict strategies were associated with parents' conflict strategies, and were significantly associated with their internal locus of control. High levels of traditionalism in young adult women were negatively associated with their internal locus of control and positively associated with their psychological distress. It appears that women perceived their parents as more egalitarian, and used conflict styles more conducive to egalitarian relationships relative to men. Advisors/Committee Members: Segrin, Chris G (advisor), Tusing, Kyle (committeemember), Emmers-Sommer, Tara (committeemember), Bechtel, Robert (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Family; egalitarianism; conflict; locus of control; adolescence

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, M. (2005). Young Adult Perceptions of Egalitarianism in their Families of Origin: An Examination of Conflict Style, Locus of Control, and Psychological Distress in Young Adult Relationships . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194936

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Melissa. “Young Adult Perceptions of Egalitarianism in their Families of Origin: An Examination of Conflict Style, Locus of Control, and Psychological Distress in Young Adult Relationships .” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed July 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194936.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Melissa. “Young Adult Perceptions of Egalitarianism in their Families of Origin: An Examination of Conflict Style, Locus of Control, and Psychological Distress in Young Adult Relationships .” 2005. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Taylor M. Young Adult Perceptions of Egalitarianism in their Families of Origin: An Examination of Conflict Style, Locus of Control, and Psychological Distress in Young Adult Relationships . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2005. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194936.

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor M. Young Adult Perceptions of Egalitarianism in their Families of Origin: An Examination of Conflict Style, Locus of Control, and Psychological Distress in Young Adult Relationships . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194936

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