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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arizona" +contributor:("Rhoads, Michelle L."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arizona

1. Penrod, Leah Vee. The Effects of EPA and DHA on the Uterine Inflammatory Response in Mares during In Vitro Culture of Endometrial Tissue .

Degree: 2011, University of Arizona

Uterine inflammation is one of the causes of a poor uterine environment. This can result in early embryonic loss in the mare due to an inhibition of or an increased secretion of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α ). Oxytocin binds to endometrial cell receptors to activate prostaglandin synthesis. Increased secretion or accumulation of PGF2α within the uterus due to uterine inflammation can cause luteolysis and result in early embryonic loss. Supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been shown to influence prostaglandin production in many species, although the effects on the mare remain unknown. Equine endometrial biopsies were collected and used to establish endometrial epithelial cell and explant cultures to determine the release of PGF2α and PGFM in response to oxytocin stimulation. Endometrial explant cultures were used to determine the inhibitory effects of Atosiban, an oxytocin receptor antagonist, and Indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase –2 inhibitor, on PGF2α secretion. Endometrial explant cultures were challenged with oxytocin (250 nM) and PGF2α concentrations were measured over time. The effects of PUFAs on equine endometrial prostaglandin production were determined using endometrial biopsies harvested on day two of behavioral estrus. Equine endometrial cells were established and shown to replicate in culture and on a basement membrane matrix. Equine endometrial explants stimulated with oxytocin had increased secretion of PGF2α and PGE2 and the secretion of PGF2α was inhibited through an oxytocin receptor antagonist and Cox inhibition. Endometrial explants stimulated with lipopolysaccharide had increased secretion of PGF2α and PGE2, however oxytocin stimulated to a greater extent than LPS. Supplementation with PUFAs, specifically DHA, decreased the secretion of PGF2α and PGE2, however AA and EPA failed to influence this response. Expression of mRNA was not influenced by fatty acid supplementation, however was altered by stimulus. Therefore DHA influences the inflammatory response in vitro through mechanisms other than enzyme expression. Decreased PGF2α production associated with PUFA supplementation in vivo, creates a likely approach for decreasing early embryonic loss associated with post breeding inflammation commonly seen in the equine industry. Advisors/Committee Members: Arns, Mark J (advisor), Limesand, Sean W (advisor), Cuneo, Peder S. (committeemember), Rhoads, Michelle L. (committeemember), Allen, Ronald E. (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: endometrium; equine; explant; fatty acid; inflammation; prostaglandin

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Penrod, L. V. (2011). The Effects of EPA and DHA on the Uterine Inflammatory Response in Mares during In Vitro Culture of Endometrial Tissue . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145149

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Penrod, Leah Vee. “The Effects of EPA and DHA on the Uterine Inflammatory Response in Mares during In Vitro Culture of Endometrial Tissue .” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145149.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Penrod, Leah Vee. “The Effects of EPA and DHA on the Uterine Inflammatory Response in Mares during In Vitro Culture of Endometrial Tissue .” 2011. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Penrod LV. The Effects of EPA and DHA on the Uterine Inflammatory Response in Mares during In Vitro Culture of Endometrial Tissue . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145149.

Council of Science Editors:

Penrod LV. The Effects of EPA and DHA on the Uterine Inflammatory Response in Mares during In Vitro Culture of Endometrial Tissue . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145149


University of Arizona

2. Sanders, Sara Ray. Effects of Heat Stress on Energetic Metabolism in Rats .

Degree: 2010, University of Arizona

Studies conducted for this dissertation utilized a rodent model exposed to single or multiple short duration heat loads in an effort to: 1) elucidate the changes in energy metabolism occurring at the tissue and whole-body level in response to hyperthermia, 2) characterize specific aspects of glucose utilization and hepatic glucose production following a heat load and 3) determine if aspects of mitochondrial function and/or dysfunction might play a role in the metabolic changes that occur in response to heat stress. Study 1 was conducted to determine if rodents exposed to heat stress shared similarities using a bovine heat stress model. Specifically, we were interested in identifying changes in blood metabolites and hormones, as well as gene expression and protein abundance of enzymes associated with energy metabolism in skeletal muscle (type I and type II), liver and adipose tissue. Previous bovine data indicates glucose may be preferentially utilized during heat stress, suggesting alterations in energy metabolism. This study provided evidence that tissue-specific changes occur in response to a heat load and that full glucose oxidation might be reduced, specifically in skeletal muscle where abundance of PDK4 mRNA was increased. Within skeletal muscle, glucose transporters (GLUTs 1 and 4) also tended to be increased in rats exposed to a heat load. Increases in skeletal muscle AMPK-α and PGC-1α as well as increased expression of energy substrate transporters suggests heat stress may impose a cellular energy deficit and/or increased energy demands which subsequently leads to changes in energy metabolism. Few changes were noted in either hepatic or adipose tissue in response to acute heat stress in this pilot study. Study aim of Chapter 3 was to further characterize the effects of heat stress on energy metabolism at the tissue and whole-body level in rats exposed to either 1 or 2 bouts of heat. Rats exposed to a 6 h heat load tended to have higher plasma glucose but reduced insulin levels, compared to thermal neutral controls, suggesting decreased glucose uptake or increased hepatic glucose output. Additionally, although heat stress likely increases whole-body energy demand, plasma NEFA levels were blunted in the early hours following onset of heat, suggesting increased adipocyte insulin sensitivity. Gene expression of enzymes associated with oxidative energy metabolism were increased in the TA (which is comprised primarily of glycolytic muscle fibers) following 2 bouts and in liver following a single bout of heat, while expression of oxidative enzymes were decreased within the soleus (a primarily oxidative muscle type). AMPK mRNA was increased following a single bout of heat in hepatic tissue and after 2 bouts of heat in type I skeletal muscle. AMPK mRNA abundance remained the same following 1 bout but was reduced following 2 bouts of heat within type II skeletal muscle. In the TA, phosphorylated AMPK protein abundance was reduced by HS. Abundance of PGC-1α mRNA was increased in types I and II skeletal muscle but was… Advisors/Committee Members: Baumgard, Lance H. (committeemember), Rhoads, Michelle L. (committeemember), Limesand, Sean W. (committeemember), Duff, Glenn C. (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: AMPK; Energy metabolism; Heat stress; Oxidative stress; Rodents

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sanders, S. R. (2010). Effects of Heat Stress on Energetic Metabolism in Rats . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194613

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sanders, Sara Ray. “Effects of Heat Stress on Energetic Metabolism in Rats .” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194613.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sanders, Sara Ray. “Effects of Heat Stress on Energetic Metabolism in Rats .” 2010. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Sanders SR. Effects of Heat Stress on Energetic Metabolism in Rats . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2010. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194613.

Council of Science Editors:

Sanders SR. Effects of Heat Stress on Energetic Metabolism in Rats . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194613

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