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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arizona" +contributor:("Foster, Billye"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arizona

1. Kramer, Brett Andrew. Livestock demographics, management practices, and attitudinal orientations of native livestock producers on the Navajo Reservation .

Degree: 1999, University of Arizona

Livestock production characteristics on the Navajo Reservation were studied to quantify and characterize herd demographics, feeding practices, management practices, marketing practices, and attitudinal orientations of producers. A stratified random (by grazing Agency) sample of the population (n = 10,000) yielded 125 possible respondents from each Agency. Face to face interviews were conducted by Navajo district grazing committeemen in the fall of 1997 for a total of 257 completed surveys. Navajo livestock producers were subsistence-level producers, who battled low birthing rates, slightly elevated mortality rates, diminished resource capacity, and challenges to economical feeding regimes. Most Navajos believed that livestock were an important part of their family's financial well-being; the Reservation was overgrazed; and that Navajos should be allowed to fence their land over their neighbors' objections. Navajo livestock production can be improved through education and greater articulation of the resource base. More detailed data collection is warranted to provide greater insight into production characteristics. Advisors/Committee Members: Foster, Billye (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Anthropology, Cultural.; Agriculture, General.; Agriculture, Animal Culture and Nutrition.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kramer, B. A. (1999). Livestock demographics, management practices, and attitudinal orientations of native livestock producers on the Navajo Reservation . (Masters Thesis). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kramer, Brett Andrew. “Livestock demographics, management practices, and attitudinal orientations of native livestock producers on the Navajo Reservation .” 1999. Masters Thesis, University of Arizona. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kramer, Brett Andrew. “Livestock demographics, management practices, and attitudinal orientations of native livestock producers on the Navajo Reservation .” 1999. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kramer BA. Livestock demographics, management practices, and attitudinal orientations of native livestock producers on the Navajo Reservation . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Arizona; 1999. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278708.

Council of Science Editors:

Kramer BA. Livestock demographics, management practices, and attitudinal orientations of native livestock producers on the Navajo Reservation . [Masters Thesis]. University of Arizona; 1999. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278708


University of Arizona

2. Zimbelman, Rosemarie Burgos. Management Strategies to Reduce Effects of Thermal Stress on Lactating Dairy Cattle .

Degree: 2008, University of Arizona

Two strategies to reduce impact of heat stress on high producing dairy cows were examined. The first was to recalculate the temperature-humidity index (THI) using high producing dairy cows under diurnal summer conditions. This re-evaluation confirmed that current THI values underestimate the severity of heat stress levels. Therefore, cooling of dairy cattle during warm summer months should begin at a THI of 68. Previously, a THI equal to or greater than 72 has been used to define onset of heat stress. This study demonstrated that a THI greater than or equal to 68 is sufficient to increase body heat storage, respiration rate, skin evaporative heat loss, declines in feed intake and milk yield. A second objective involved three studies carried out to evaluate use of niacin in dairy cow rations to improve evaporative heat loss and resistance to heat stress. Niacin is known to cause intense vasodilation in human and lab species. We hypothesized that increasing vasodilation would improve evaporative heat loss in dairy cows. In the first niacin study, supplementation of lactating dairy cows with an encapsulated rumen by-pass form of niacin (NIASHUREâ„¢; Balchem Corporation, New Hampton, NY) at a dose of 12 g/d proved effective in alleviating some affects of heat stress during mild thermal stress. We hypothesized that encapsulated niacin would induce vasodilation effects documented in humans and lab animals increasing evaporative heat loss. Past research demonstrated that the possible mechanism for vasodilation affects seen by niacin were most likely due to prostaglandin D secretions. Niacin may act through increased prostaglandin D and E production and secretion by Langerhans cells which then act upon vascular endothelial prostaglandin D receptors to increase vasodilation. No studies have evaluated impact of encapsulated niacin on milk yield and composition during periods of thermal stress under commercial dairy conditions. The objective of the last study was to examine the effects of encapsulated niacin during heat stress on milk production and composition as well as core body temperatures under commercial conditions. Advisors/Committee Members: Collier, Robert J (advisor), Baumgard, Lance H (committeemember), Duff, Glenn C (committeemember), Bilby, Todd R (committeemember), Foster, Billye (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Heat stress; niacin; temperature humidity index; THI

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zimbelman, R. B. (2008). Management Strategies to Reduce Effects of Thermal Stress on Lactating Dairy Cattle . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195322

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zimbelman, Rosemarie Burgos. “Management Strategies to Reduce Effects of Thermal Stress on Lactating Dairy Cattle .” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195322.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zimbelman, Rosemarie Burgos. “Management Strategies to Reduce Effects of Thermal Stress on Lactating Dairy Cattle .” 2008. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Zimbelman RB. Management Strategies to Reduce Effects of Thermal Stress on Lactating Dairy Cattle . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195322.

Council of Science Editors:

Zimbelman RB. Management Strategies to Reduce Effects of Thermal Stress on Lactating Dairy Cattle . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195322

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