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You searched for +publisher:"University of Arizona" +contributor:("Bennett, Jeff"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Arizona

1. Wilson, Chadwick. Relative Influences of Arizona High School Principals' Job Satisfaction .

Degree: 2009, University of Arizona

High school principals are organizational leaders that are critical to the pursuit of providing students a quality opportunity to learn. Impeding the attraction and retention of quality leadership is the thoughtful analysis of influences affecting the job satisfaction of the high school principal.This study used a mixed-method approach to data gathering. The quantitative method selected was survey research. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics by frequency distributions, percentages, means, and standard deviations. In addition, the five hypotheses were tested using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). When the omnibus Fs indicated significance, Tukey's post-hoc tests were performed to determine which level/groups of the independent variables were significantly different.The second method used to gather data was qualitative techniques in research. A semi-structured interview of five Arizona high school principals was constructed based on the analysis of data derived from the quantitative survey.Results of the analysis suggested that being a high school principal in the State of Arizona can be an intrinsically, extrinsically, and generally satisfying job. In addition, results of this study suggest a significant relationship between high school principals' job satisfaction and the quality of their professional development. This project also revealed there was no significant relationship between job satisfaction and financial compensation.Future research should look to determine if quality professional development is defined as the current needs facing the high school principal, the lack of preparation individuals received prior to becoming a high school principal, or if quality professional development is significant because it provides high school principals the opportunity to develop relationships with colleagues outside of their individual school. Advisors/Committee Members: Hendricks, Robert (advisor), Pedicone, John (committeemember), Bennett, Jeff (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Job Satisfaction; Principal

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, C. (2009). Relative Influences of Arizona High School Principals' Job Satisfaction . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195173

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Chadwick. “Relative Influences of Arizona High School Principals' Job Satisfaction .” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed April 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195173.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Chadwick. “Relative Influences of Arizona High School Principals' Job Satisfaction .” 2009. Web. 22 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilson C. Relative Influences of Arizona High School Principals' Job Satisfaction . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2009. [cited 2019 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195173.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson C. Relative Influences of Arizona High School Principals' Job Satisfaction . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195173


University of Arizona

2. Molera, Joan Elizabeth. Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools .

Degree: 2015, University of Arizona

This dissertation is about curriculum and leadership in Arizona-Mexico border community schools. Specifically, I examine intended and received language arts curricula (i.e., what content is taught, to whom, and with what pedagogy) (Porter, 2004), the misalignments between these curriculum types, and the misalignments in leadership approaches in border community schools. My dissertation draws on both classic and critical curriculum leadership studies (e.g., Hallinger, 2008; Johnson, 2006) with an emphasis on Funds of Knowledge (e.g., Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez, 1992), cultural capital (e.g., Yosso, 2005), and habitus (e.g., Bourdieu & Passeron, 1990). I utilize ethnographic and phenomenological approaches to my study of four elementary and three middle schools located in two Arizona-Mexico border communities 120 miles apart from each other. Findings suggest that children living in border communities exhibit cultural capital (Yosso, 2005) and Funds of Knowledge (Moll et al., 1992), but these strengths are not considered in the intended curricula. Participants see the culture of the border and the culture of the school as two very separate constructs, particularly in relation to curriculum. The children in the study consider this reality commonsensical. Culturally responsive curriculum leaders, though positioned to change the status quo, are compliant and helpless against the dominant standardized regime. External forces silence everything these leaders know about research and practice. My dissertation concludes with implications for research, practice, and policy to blend culturally responsive structures, pedagogy, and behaviors to the standardization movement. Advisors/Committee Members: Ylimaki, Rose (advisor), Ylimaki, Rose (committeemember), Bennett, Jeff (committeemember), Doyle, Walter (committeemember), Koyama, Jill (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: classic leadership; critical leadership; cultural capital; Funds of Knowledge; standardization; Educational Leadership; border community

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Molera, J. E. (2015). Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565833

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Molera, Joan Elizabeth. “Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools .” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed April 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565833.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Molera, Joan Elizabeth. “Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools .” 2015. Web. 22 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Molera JE. Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565833.

Council of Science Editors:

Molera JE. Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565833

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