Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama – Birmingham" +contributor:("Wright, Rex A."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Hale, Timothy M. The relationship of adolescent cognitive ability to adult physical health : socioeconomic status and health behavior as mediating variables.

Degree: MA, 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The specific aims of this study are to address three interrelated questions: 1) What is the relationship between adolescent cognitive ability and adult physical health? 2) Do intervening variables in adulthood—socioeconomic status and health-related behavior—mediate the relationship between adolescent cognitive ability and adult physical health? 3) What indirect effects are explained by the relationship between adult SES and healthrelated behavior? A growing body of research finds early cognitive ability to be a significant predictor of adult health. Adult SES and health-related behaviors have been proposed by researchers as mechanisms that explain this relationship. Although previous research finds adult SES partially mediates this relationship, the mediation associated with healthrelated behaviors has not been adequately examined. This study introduces the health lifestyle model to explain how adult SES influences health-related behaviors, to form distinct patterns of behaviors that serve as markers of status and identity. To examine these questions this study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The NLSY contains a test of cognitive ability, administered in 1979 when participants were 14-22 years old. Physical health is measured using the physical component summary (PCS) calculated from the Short-Form 12, a health-related quality of life instrument administered in 1998-2004 when participants turned 40 years of age. The findings indicate that adolescent cognitive ability is positively associated with adult physical health after controlling for differences in sociodemographics, region, place of residence, and parental SES. Adult SES is the stronger mechanism, explaining about 64 percent of the direct effect between adolescent cognitive ability and adult physical health. Health-related behaviors do not substantially mediate this relationship after controlling for adult SES. These results highlight that individual differences in cognitive ability influence health primarily through socially structured pathways—cognitive ability is positively associated with achieved SES that in turn positively influences health.

M.A.

xi, 83 p. : ill., facsim., digital, PDF file

Sociology

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Cognitive ability Intelligence Socioeconomic status Health behavior Fundamental cause Medical sociology

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Hwang, Sean-Shong, Cotten, Sheila R. <br>, Wright, Rex A..

Subjects/Keywords: Cognition in adolescence  – Health aspects  – United States  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Young adults  – Health and hygiene  – United States  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Young adults  – Social conditions  – Health aspects  – United States  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Young adults  – Economic conditions  – Health aspects  – United States  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Middle-aged persons  – Health and hygiene  – United States  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Middle-aged persons  – Social conditions  – Health aspects  – United States  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Middle-aged persons  – Economic conditions  – Health aspects  – United States  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Health behavior  – Age factors  – United States  – Longitudinal studies.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hale, T. M. (2008). The relationship of adolescent cognitive ability to adult physical health : socioeconomic status and health behavior as mediating variables. (Masters Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,445

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hale, Timothy M. “The relationship of adolescent cognitive ability to adult physical health : socioeconomic status and health behavior as mediating variables.” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,445.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hale, Timothy M. “The relationship of adolescent cognitive ability to adult physical health : socioeconomic status and health behavior as mediating variables.” 2008. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hale TM. The relationship of adolescent cognitive ability to adult physical health : socioeconomic status and health behavior as mediating variables. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,445.

Council of Science Editors:

Hale TM. The relationship of adolescent cognitive ability to adult physical health : socioeconomic status and health behavior as mediating variables. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,445

2. LaGory, Jason. The effects of naturally-occurring fatigue and task difficulty on effort related cardiovascular response.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Wright’s integrative analysis suggests that effort can be measured via cardiovascular (CV) response. In addition, the analysis breaks with tradition in suggesting that effort varies not with benefit alone, but also with the difficulty of the behavioral challenge at hand. Recent research has focused upon the effects of fatigue on effort related CV response, assuming that fatigue negatively affects perceived ability. Results have supported interactional predictions. Specifically, they have indicated higher levels of CV response among high- as compared to low fatigue participants when tasks were possible and worthwhile and the reverse response pattern when tasks were excessively difficult (given the incentive) or impossible. One implication is that high fatigue individuals may strive harder than low fatigue individuals in meeting challenges perceived as possible and worthwhile. If they do so chronically, this could yield chronically elevated CV responses and increased risk for negative health outcomes such as hypertension and heart disease. The purpose of the present study was to extend the preceding fatigue research by (1) studying participants with low and high levels of naturally occurring fatigue, and (2) doing so across multiple task difficulty levels, including an extreme difficulty condition. Each participant calculated mentally the sum of increasingly difficult series of audible numbers and was offered a modest monetary reward for each correct sum total. Analysis of CV responses measured during the task periods indicated that for Low Fatigue participants, a quadratic trend for SBP, DBP, and HR responsiveness was present, with responses rising with difficulty up to a point and then declining. CV response was low for High Fatigue participants, regardless of difficulty, and especially low in the impossible task condition. Results were interpreted to suggest that fatigue in High Fatigue participants was so high that it discouraged engagement even when difficulty was low. Wright’s integrative fatigue analysis implies that a different cardiovascular response pattern might have been observed for High Fatigue participants had a more powerful performance incentive been provided. This work has practical implications not only for health, but also for performance outcomes in social, educational, and occupational settings.

1 online resource (xi, 132 p.) : ill., forms.

Psychology

College of Arts and Sciences

Fatigue Cardiovascular response Motivation Effort Active coping

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Wright, Rex A., Griffith, Elizabeth <br>, Mrug, Sylvie <br>, Schwebel, David <br>, Tucker, Diane.

Subjects/Keywords: Cardiovascular system  – Psychophysiology <; br>; Fatigue  – Physiological aspects  – Measurement <; br>; Fatigue  – Psychological aspects <; br>; Motivation (Psychology) <; br>; Struggle  – Measurement <; br>; Fatigue  – Health aspects

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

LaGory, J. (2009). The effects of naturally-occurring fatigue and task difficulty on effort related cardiovascular response. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1009

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

LaGory, Jason. “The effects of naturally-occurring fatigue and task difficulty on effort related cardiovascular response.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1009.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

LaGory, Jason. “The effects of naturally-occurring fatigue and task difficulty on effort related cardiovascular response.” 2009. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

LaGory J. The effects of naturally-occurring fatigue and task difficulty on effort related cardiovascular response. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1009.

Council of Science Editors:

LaGory J. The effects of naturally-occurring fatigue and task difficulty on effort related cardiovascular response. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1009

.