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You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama – Birmingham" +contributor:("Webb, Samantha"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Stewart, James C. The ghost of Godwin : intertextuality and embedded correspondence in the works of the Shelley circle.

Degree: MA, 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The members of the Shelley Circle attempted to live their lives by and produce works consistent with an arguably unrealistic and utopian political value system. Thematically, the writers show remarkable similarity in attempting to render the ideal real. During the period between 1816 and 1819, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, and William Godwin were struggling with living their ideals in a harsh reality. I examine two major works from each author: Godwin’s Political Justice and Caleb Williams, Percy Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound and The Cenci, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Mathilda. In each case (with the exception of Godwin), when moving from the former to the latter works, a thematic shift occurs which focuses on the father figure as an allegorical expression of tyranny. There is also a chronological component whereby ideals—and the attendant problems of implementing those ideals—give way to a more pragmatic explication of a “middle way,” between absolute tyranny and the New Philosophy’s brand of political anarchy. Godwin escapes the pattern because he establishes his utopian vision in Political Justice and dramatizes its precepts in Caleb Williams. And, perhaps more importantly, he is the central father figure in the Shelley Circle. The central idea in Political Justice of humanity’s “perfectibility” is extrapolated and realized over the course of these works in the cases of each author and the Circle as a group. With close reading of the primary texts, I show that there is a necessarily more discursive and recursive process unique to this writing community in effect. Although they were all radical thinkers and writers at different times, they realized that those who survive get to tell the tale and that pure reason sometimes does not triumph over tyranny.

M.A.

v, 71 p. : digital, PDF file.

English

Arts and Humanities

Shelly Godwin Intertextuality Correspondence Political justice Family

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Grimes, Kyle, Graves, Randa <br>, Siegel, Daniel <br>, Webb, Samantha.

Subjects/Keywords: Godwin, William, 1756-1836. Enquiry concerning political justice <; br>; Godwin, William, 1756-1836. Things as they are <; br>; Father figures in literature <; br>; Utopias in literature <; br>; Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822. Prometheus unbound <; br>; Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822. Cenci <; br>; Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, 1797-1851. Frankenstein <; br>; Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, 1797-1851. Matilda.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stewart, J. C. (2008). The ghost of Godwin : intertextuality and embedded correspondence in the works of the Shelley circle. (Masters Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,355

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stewart, James C. “The ghost of Godwin : intertextuality and embedded correspondence in the works of the Shelley circle.” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,355.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stewart, James C. “The ghost of Godwin : intertextuality and embedded correspondence in the works of the Shelley circle.” 2008. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Stewart JC. The ghost of Godwin : intertextuality and embedded correspondence in the works of the Shelley circle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,355.

Council of Science Editors:

Stewart JC. The ghost of Godwin : intertextuality and embedded correspondence in the works of the Shelley circle. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,355

2. Scott, Jonathan Harold. New moon light.

Degree: MA, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The title of this collection, New Moon Light, is meant to convey an underlying theme of discovery in nature. The implication is one of illumination in fresh perspectives. The new moon actually being an unseen or miniscule one, the light shed in many of these poems turns out to be a discovery best suited to relative darkness. Thematically, I seem to have roughly four tendencies. The first is my frequent use of images that seem to contradict with the rationale or sentiment of the poem. I like tension for its own sake and the potential for relief that it implies. A second tendency I have is to write about family dynamics—issues that arise from both interaction and separation. My third predilection involves poems that deal with the workings of memory. I am especially interested in the aspects of memory that suffer from ambiguity but nonetheless manage to produce vivid, insightful images for the speaker or the reader. The fourth category is comprised of poems that try to wrap flesh around the abstract concept of Time. Primarily, when I think of time poetically, I think of evanescence.

M.A.

1 online resource (vi, 41 p.) : digital, PDF file.

English

Arts and Humanities

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Anderson, Daniel, Collins, Robert <br>, Hoff, Ann <br>, Webb, Samantha.

Subjects/Keywords: Family life  – Poetry <; br>; Memory  – Poetry <; br>; Time  – Poetry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scott, J. H. (2009). New moon light. (Masters Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,555

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scott, Jonathan Harold. “New moon light.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,555.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scott, Jonathan Harold. “New moon light.” 2009. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Scott JH. New moon light. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,555.

Council of Science Editors:

Scott JH. New moon light. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,555

3. Busby, Clara Delene. John Keats And The Perceiving Subject In The Fall Of Hyperion: Poetics, Symbol, And Play.

Degree: 2014, University of Alabama – Birmingham

For my thesis, I claim that John Keats's poem, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, exemplifies the aesthetic theory of German philosopher/poet/playwright Friedrich Schiller as explicated in On the Aesthetic Education of Man in a Series of Letters. I am analyzing Keats's poem through Samuel Taylor Coleridge's theory of the symbol as asserted in The Statesman's Manual . . . in conjunction with Schiller's aesthetic letters, and my claim is that Keats's poem illustrates Schiller's theory of the play-drive. What Schiller terms as the play-drive is what happens cognitively when we make and/or encounter the beautiful in art. He claims that we transcend our material selves when we make and/or encounter the beautiful, and in transcending toward our formal selves, we are able to look back onto ourselves and feel pleasure from the beautiful. Schiller claims that because we are embodied, we first experience the beautiful through our sensuous drive, and when that happens, we then rationalize the experience and transcend to a higher plane of formal consciousness. This philosophy, along with Coleridge's ideas on the symbol, suggests that during the process of the human imagination, our subjectivity becomes projected onto an objectified symbol. When this happens, our subjectivity fuses with this objective symbol, we become free to be who we will ourselves to be, and we know ourselves as human beings. In that moment, as we can see ourselves as part of a universal humanity, we self-actualize. Schiller believed that beauty is what links the sense experience, what he terms to be the material impulse, or sensuous drive, with the rational, what he terms to be the formal impulse or formal drive; in other words, beauty synthesizes these two impulses, balancing the two drives. Schiller's play instinct integrates the two impulses and represents the movement between the faculties of sense and reason; this play-drive gives us freedom – as in, one faculty or the other cannot enslave us. On the literal, meta-level, Keats's acts of both imagination and composition function in the same way as Schiller's play-drive, and I see The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream following this aesthetic pattern structurally and figuratively.

MAE

1 online resource (xi, 120 pages)

M.A.University of Alabama at Birmingham2014.

English

College of Arts and Sciences

Aesthetics Coleridgean Symbol Keats Play Poetics Schiller

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Kyle Grimes, Siegel,Daniel Webb,Samantha.
Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Busby, C. D. (2014). John Keats And The Perceiving Subject In The Fall Of Hyperion: Poetics, Symbol, And Play. (Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1827

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Busby, Clara Delene. “John Keats And The Perceiving Subject In The Fall Of Hyperion: Poetics, Symbol, And Play.” 2014. Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1827.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Busby, Clara Delene. “John Keats And The Perceiving Subject In The Fall Of Hyperion: Poetics, Symbol, And Play.” 2014. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Busby CD. John Keats And The Perceiving Subject In The Fall Of Hyperion: Poetics, Symbol, And Play. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1827.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Busby CD. John Keats And The Perceiving Subject In The Fall Of Hyperion: Poetics, Symbol, And Play. [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2014. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1827

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.