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You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama – Birmingham" +contributor:("Sontheimer, Harald"). Showing records 1 – 20 of 20 total matches.

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1. Haas, Brian Robert. The sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in glioma biology.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The most common malignant primary brain tumor, gliomas usually derive from glial cells including oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. These tumors are characterized by high rates of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brain Neoplasms<; br>; Bumetanide  – pharmacology<; br>; Glioma<; br>; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases  – metabolism<; br>; Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors  – pharmacology<; br>; Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters  – metabolism

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APA (6th Edition):

Haas, B. R. (2011). The sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in glioma biology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1165

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haas, Brian Robert. “The sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in glioma biology.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1165.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haas, Brian Robert. “The sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in glioma biology.” 2011. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Haas BR. The sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in glioma biology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1165.

Council of Science Editors:

Haas BR. The sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in glioma biology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1165

2. Ernest, Nola Jean Sieber. The role of chloride in the volume regulation of human glioma cells.

Degree: PhD, 2007, University of Alabama – Birmingham

According to the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, the most common primary brain tumors are gliomas, tumors composed of cells of glial… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brain Neoplasms  – physiopathology <; br>; Cell Size <; br>; Chloride Channels  – physiology <; br>; Glioma  – physiopathology <; br>

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APA (6th Edition):

Ernest, N. J. S. (2007). The role of chloride in the volume regulation of human glioma cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,86

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ernest, Nola Jean Sieber. “The role of chloride in the volume regulation of human glioma cells.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,86.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ernest, Nola Jean Sieber. “The role of chloride in the volume regulation of human glioma cells.” 2007. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ernest NJS. The role of chloride in the volume regulation of human glioma cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2007. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,86.

Council of Science Editors:

Ernest NJS. The role of chloride in the volume regulation of human glioma cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2007. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,86

3. Bantug, Glenn Robert Burgner. CD8+ T-lymphocytes and the control of cytomegalovirus infection of the newborn central nervous system.

Degree: PhD, 2007, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Congenital HCMV infection of the developing brain is the leading viral cause of mental retardation and sensorineural hearing loss. To elucidate the pathogenesis of congenital… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brain  – pathology <; br>; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes  – immunology <; br>; Central Nervous System Diseases  – immunology <; br>; Central Nervous System Diseases  – virology <; br>; Cytomegalovirus Infections  – pathology <; br>; Muromegalovirus  – physiology <; br>; Virus Replication

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APA (6th Edition):

Bantug, G. R. B. (2007). CD8+ T-lymphocytes and the control of cytomegalovirus infection of the newborn central nervous system. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,359

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bantug, Glenn Robert Burgner. “CD8+ T-lymphocytes and the control of cytomegalovirus infection of the newborn central nervous system.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,359.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bantug, Glenn Robert Burgner. “CD8+ T-lymphocytes and the control of cytomegalovirus infection of the newborn central nervous system.” 2007. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Bantug GRB. CD8+ T-lymphocytes and the control of cytomegalovirus infection of the newborn central nervous system. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2007. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,359.

Council of Science Editors:

Bantug GRB. CD8+ T-lymphocytes and the control of cytomegalovirus infection of the newborn central nervous system. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2007. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,359

4. McFarland, Braden Cox. Targeting angiogenesis with plasminogen kringle 5.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The recombinant fifth kringle domain of plasminogen (rK5) has been shown to induce apoptosis of dermal microvessel endothelial cells (MvEC), and this pro-apoptotic effect required… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Angiogenesis Inhibitors  – metabolism<; br>; Apoptosis<; br>; Glioblastoma  – blood supply<; br>; Neovascularization, Pathologic  – drug therapy<; br>; Plasminogen  – therapeutic use

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APA (6th Edition):

McFarland, B. C. (2009). Targeting angiogenesis with plasminogen kringle 5. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,399

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McFarland, Braden Cox. “Targeting angiogenesis with plasminogen kringle 5.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,399.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McFarland, Braden Cox. “Targeting angiogenesis with plasminogen kringle 5.” 2009. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

McFarland BC. Targeting angiogenesis with plasminogen kringle 5. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,399.

Council of Science Editors:

McFarland BC. Targeting angiogenesis with plasminogen kringle 5. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,399

5. Habela, Christa Whelan. Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by dynamic chloride dependent changes in cell volumes.

Degree: PhD, 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The hypothesis that cell volume and the progression of the cell cycle are interdependent has surfaced off and on in the cell cycle literature for… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cell Cycle  – physiology<; br>; Cell Movement  – physiology<; br>; Cell Proliferation<; br>; Cell Size<; br>; Chloride Channels  – physiology<; br>; Chlorides  – metabolism<; br>; Cytokinesis  – physiology<; br>; Glioma  – physiopathology<; br>; Mitosis  – physiology<; br>; Neuroglia  – physiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Habela, C. W. (2008). Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by dynamic chloride dependent changes in cell volumes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,444

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Habela, Christa Whelan. “Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by dynamic chloride dependent changes in cell volumes.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,444.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Habela, Christa Whelan. “Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by dynamic chloride dependent changes in cell volumes.” 2008. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Habela CW. Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by dynamic chloride dependent changes in cell volumes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,444.

Council of Science Editors:

Habela CW. Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by dynamic chloride dependent changes in cell volumes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,444

6. Majumdar, Debeshi. Localization and function of electrogenic Na/Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 in rat brain.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Na-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters (NCBTs) are members of the bicarbonate transporter superfamily that play important roles in regulating intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHo) in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brain  – metabolism<; br>; Nerve Tissue Proteins  – genetics<; br>; Protein Isoforms  – genetics<; br>; Protein Isoforms  – metabolism<; br>; Rats<; br>; Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters  – metabolism

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APA (6th Edition):

Majumdar, D. (2009). Localization and function of electrogenic Na/Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 in rat brain. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,571

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Majumdar, Debeshi. “Localization and function of electrogenic Na/Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 in rat brain.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,571.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Majumdar, Debeshi. “Localization and function of electrogenic Na/Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 in rat brain.” 2009. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Majumdar D. Localization and function of electrogenic Na/Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 in rat brain. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,571.

Council of Science Editors:

Majumdar D. Localization and function of electrogenic Na/Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 in rat brain. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,571

7. Bomben, Valerie Christine. Role of transient receptor potential canonical channels in glioma cell biology.

Degree: PhD, 2010, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Gliomas, primary brain tumors derived from glial cells, constitute the majority of malignant tumors within the central nervous system. The most malignant of these tumors,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brain Neoplasms  – pathology<; br>; Cell Cycle<; br>; Glioma  – pathology<; br>; Transient Receptor Potential Channels  – antagonists & inhibitors

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APA (6th Edition):

Bomben, V. C. (2010). Role of transient receptor potential canonical channels in glioma cell biology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,642

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bomben, Valerie Christine. “Role of transient receptor potential canonical channels in glioma cell biology.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,642.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bomben, Valerie Christine. “Role of transient receptor potential canonical channels in glioma cell biology.” 2010. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Bomben VC. Role of transient receptor potential canonical channels in glioma cell biology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,642.

Council of Science Editors:

Bomben VC. Role of transient receptor potential canonical channels in glioma cell biology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,642

8. Reyes, Reno Cervo. The role of mitochondria and plasma membrane CA²⁺ transport systems in CA²⁺-dependent glutamate release from rat cortical astrocytes.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Astrocytes, a type of glial cell in the central nervous system, are recognized for their support roles to neurons. They supply neurons with metabolites, maintain… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Astrocytes  – metabolism<; br>; Astrocytes  – ultrastructure<; br>; Calcium  – metabolism<; br>; Exocytosis  – physiology<; br>; Glutamic Acid  – metabolism<; br>; Mitochondria  – physiology<; br>; Visual Cortex  – cytology

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APA (6th Edition):

Reyes, R. C. (2009). The role of mitochondria and plasma membrane CA²⁺ transport systems in CA²⁺-dependent glutamate release from rat cortical astrocytes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,688

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reyes, Reno Cervo. “The role of mitochondria and plasma membrane CA²⁺ transport systems in CA²⁺-dependent glutamate release from rat cortical astrocytes.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,688.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reyes, Reno Cervo. “The role of mitochondria and plasma membrane CA²⁺ transport systems in CA²⁺-dependent glutamate release from rat cortical astrocytes.” 2009. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Reyes RC. The role of mitochondria and plasma membrane CA²⁺ transport systems in CA²⁺-dependent glutamate release from rat cortical astrocytes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,688.

Council of Science Editors:

Reyes RC. The role of mitochondria and plasma membrane CA²⁺ transport systems in CA²⁺-dependent glutamate release from rat cortical astrocytes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,688

9. McCoy, Eric. Expression and function of aquaporins in malignant and non-malignant astrocytes.

Degree: PhD, 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Aquaporins (AQP) constitute the primary pathway for water movement across cellular membrances. As a result, their expression and function are important for regulating cell volume.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Aquaporin 1 Aquaporin 4<; br>; Aquaporins  – metabolism<; br>; Astrocytes  – physiology<; br>; Brain Injuries  – physiopathology<; br>; Brain Neoplasms  – metabolism<; br>; Cell Movement<; br>; Neoplasm Invasiveness<; br>; Wounds, Stab  – physiopathology

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APA (6th Edition):

McCoy, E. (2008). Expression and function of aquaporins in malignant and non-malignant astrocytes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,774

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCoy, Eric. “Expression and function of aquaporins in malignant and non-malignant astrocytes.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,774.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCoy, Eric. “Expression and function of aquaporins in malignant and non-malignant astrocytes.” 2008. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

McCoy E. Expression and function of aquaporins in malignant and non-malignant astrocytes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,774.

Council of Science Editors:

McCoy E. Expression and function of aquaporins in malignant and non-malignant astrocytes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,774

10. Rubio, Maria Dolores. Myosin II in hippocampal synapses: regulation of synaptic plasticity, strength and actin dynamics by two distinct isoforms.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Cytoskeletal actin filaments underlie dendritic spine plasticity, critical for several forms of learning and memory. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate actin dynamics is essential… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Actins  – metabolism<; br>; Cardiac Myosins  – physiology<; br>; Long-Term Potentiation  – physiology<; br>; Memory  – physiology<; br>; Myosin Heavy Chains  – physiology<; br>; Neurons  – metabolism<; br>; Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIB  – metabolism<; br>; Synapses  – physiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Rubio, M. D. (2011). Myosin II in hippocampal synapses: regulation of synaptic plasticity, strength and actin dynamics by two distinct isoforms. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,878

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rubio, Maria Dolores. “Myosin II in hippocampal synapses: regulation of synaptic plasticity, strength and actin dynamics by two distinct isoforms.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,878.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rubio, Maria Dolores. “Myosin II in hippocampal synapses: regulation of synaptic plasticity, strength and actin dynamics by two distinct isoforms.” 2011. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Rubio MD. Myosin II in hippocampal synapses: regulation of synaptic plasticity, strength and actin dynamics by two distinct isoforms. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,878.

Council of Science Editors:

Rubio MD. Myosin II in hippocampal synapses: regulation of synaptic plasticity, strength and actin dynamics by two distinct isoforms. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,878

11. Ogunrinu, Toyin Adeyemi. Role of the cystine-glutamate exchanger in glioma cell biology.

Degree: PhD, 2010, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Changes in the glioma microenvironment including oxygen (O2) levels, supply of amino acid such as L-glutamate and L-cystine and glutathione (GSH) concentrations play a critical… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Anoxia  – metabolism<; br>; Brain Neoplasms  – metabolism<; br>; Glioblastoma  – metabolism<; br>; Glioma  – metabolism<; br>; Glutathione  – metabolism<; br>; Glutamic Acid  – metabolism

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APA (6th Edition):

Ogunrinu, T. A. (2010). Role of the cystine-glutamate exchanger in glioma cell biology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,956

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ogunrinu, Toyin Adeyemi. “Role of the cystine-glutamate exchanger in glioma cell biology.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,956.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ogunrinu, Toyin Adeyemi. “Role of the cystine-glutamate exchanger in glioma cell biology.” 2010. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ogunrinu TA. Role of the cystine-glutamate exchanger in glioma cell biology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,956.

Council of Science Editors:

Ogunrinu TA. Role of the cystine-glutamate exchanger in glioma cell biology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,956

12. McFerrin, Michael Bryan. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in glioblastoma cell volume regulation.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The most common and most malignant gliomas are the Grade IV Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), characterized by a highly proliferative tumor mass and extremely invasive phenotype… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Apoptosis<; br>; Glioblastoma  – metabolism<; br>; Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels<; br>; Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels<; br>; Potassium Channels, Calcium-Activated  – metabolism

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APA (6th Edition):

McFerrin, M. B. (2011). Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in glioblastoma cell volume regulation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1054

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McFerrin, Michael Bryan. “Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in glioblastoma cell volume regulation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1054.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McFerrin, Michael Bryan. “Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in glioblastoma cell volume regulation.” 2011. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

McFerrin MB. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in glioblastoma cell volume regulation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1054.

Council of Science Editors:

McFerrin MB. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in glioblastoma cell volume regulation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1054

13. Stout, Randy Franklin. Calcium dynamics of glial cells and genetic influences on behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Alabama – Birmingham

A major challenge in neuroscience is understanding how the different neural cell types work together to process information and produce a behavioral output. Glial cells… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Astrocytes  – metabolism<; br>; Caenorhabditis elegans<; br>; Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins  – metabolism<; br>; Calcium Channels, L-Type  – metabolism<; br>; Neuroglia  – metabolism<; br>; Oligodendroglia  – metabolism

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APA (6th Edition):

Stout, R. F. (2011). Calcium dynamics of glial cells and genetic influences on behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1066

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stout, Randy Franklin. “Calcium dynamics of glial cells and genetic influences on behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1066.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stout, Randy Franklin. “Calcium dynamics of glial cells and genetic influences on behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.” 2011. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Stout RF. Calcium dynamics of glial cells and genetic influences on behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1066.

Council of Science Editors:

Stout RF. Calcium dynamics of glial cells and genetic influences on behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1066

14. Johnson, G. The Role Of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response In Glioma Cell Death.

Degree: 2012, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Malignant gliomas, including glioblastomas, are the main primary adult brain tumor. Even with current therapies, the median survival time for patients diagnosed with glioblastomas is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols – therapeutic use Apoptosis – drug effects Endoplasmic Reticulum – physiology. Glioma – drug therapy Glioma – physiopathology Molecular Targeted Therapy. Spiperone.

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, G. (2012). The Role Of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response In Glioma Cell Death. (Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1741

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, G. “The Role Of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response In Glioma Cell Death.” 2012. Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1741.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, G. “The Role Of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response In Glioma Cell Death.” 2012. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Johnson G. The Role Of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response In Glioma Cell Death. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1741.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson G. The Role Of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response In Glioma Cell Death. [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2012. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1741

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

15. Qadri, Yawar J. Small molecule inhibitors of acid sensing ion channel-1.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1 is one of the many proteins in the Epithelial Sodium Channel/Degenerin family. The proteins in this family interact to form… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Amiloride  – pharmacology<; br>; Nerve Tissue Proteins  – chemistry<; br>; Nerve Tissue Proteins  – metabolism<; br>; Sodium Channels  – chemistry<; br>; Spider Venoms  – metabolism

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APA (6th Edition):

Qadri, Y. J. (2009). Small molecule inhibitors of acid sensing ion channel-1. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1174

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Qadri, Yawar J. “Small molecule inhibitors of acid sensing ion channel-1.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1174.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Qadri, Yawar J. “Small molecule inhibitors of acid sensing ion channel-1.” 2009. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Qadri YJ. Small molecule inhibitors of acid sensing ion channel-1. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1174.

Council of Science Editors:

Qadri YJ. Small molecule inhibitors of acid sensing ion channel-1. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1174

16. Penton, Rachel E. (Rachel Elizabeth). Changes in hippocampal excitability during withdrawal from chronic nicotine.

Degree: PhD, 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Drug-seeking behavior following chronic drug use lasts for many months or even years. Short-term withdrawal experiments have suggested that the neuroadaptations thought to underlie learning… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brain  – drug effects <; br>; Hippocampus  – drug effects <; br>; Nicotine  – adverse effects <; br>; Rats <; br>; Receptors, Nicotinic  – metabolism <; br>; Substance Withdrawal Syndrome  – physiopathology <; br>; Time Factors

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APA (6th Edition):

Penton, R. E. (. E. (2008). Changes in hippocampal excitability during withdrawal from chronic nicotine. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,334

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Penton, Rachel E (Rachel Elizabeth). “Changes in hippocampal excitability during withdrawal from chronic nicotine.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,334.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Penton, Rachel E (Rachel Elizabeth). “Changes in hippocampal excitability during withdrawal from chronic nicotine.” 2008. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Penton RE(E. Changes in hippocampal excitability during withdrawal from chronic nicotine. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,334.

Council of Science Editors:

Penton RE(E. Changes in hippocampal excitability during withdrawal from chronic nicotine. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,334

17. Yuskaitis, Christopher Joseph. Neuroinflammation and Fragile X syndrome: regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Neuroinflammation and Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are two particularly devastating neurologic conditions for which no adequate treatment exists and much is still unknown about the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein  – genetics<; br>; Gene Expression Regulation  – genetics<; br>; Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3  – antagonists & inhibitors<; br>; Inflammation Mediators  – metabolism<; br>; Lithium Chloride  – pharmacology<; br>; Microglia  – drug effects

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APA (6th Edition):

Yuskaitis, C. J. (2009). Neuroinflammation and Fragile X syndrome: regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,507

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yuskaitis, Christopher Joseph. “Neuroinflammation and Fragile X syndrome: regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,507.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yuskaitis, Christopher Joseph. “Neuroinflammation and Fragile X syndrome: regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3.” 2009. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Yuskaitis CJ. Neuroinflammation and Fragile X syndrome: regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,507.

Council of Science Editors:

Yuskaitis CJ. Neuroinflammation and Fragile X syndrome: regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,507

18. McCoy, Portia Anne. Intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying muscarinic dependent plasticity in visual cortex and the impact of cholinergic degeneration.

Degree: PhD, 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Cholinergic innervation to visual cortex is essential for spatial learning and memory as well as normal visual function. Long-term depression (LTD) or potentiation (LTP) dependent… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Adrenergic Fibers  – physiology<; br>; Cholinergic Fibers  – physiology<; br>; Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases  – physiology<; br>; Long-Term Synaptic Depression<; br>; Neuronal Plasticity  – physiology<; br>; Protein Kinase C  – physiology<; br>; Receptors, Muscarinic  – physiology<; br>; Sympathetic Fibers, Postganglionic  – physiology<; br>; Visual Cortex  – physiology

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APA (6th Edition):

McCoy, P. A. (2008). Intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying muscarinic dependent plasticity in visual cortex and the impact of cholinergic degeneration. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,750

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCoy, Portia Anne. “Intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying muscarinic dependent plasticity in visual cortex and the impact of cholinergic degeneration.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,750.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCoy, Portia Anne. “Intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying muscarinic dependent plasticity in visual cortex and the impact of cholinergic degeneration.” 2008. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

McCoy PA. Intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying muscarinic dependent plasticity in visual cortex and the impact of cholinergic degeneration. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,750.

Council of Science Editors:

McCoy PA. Intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying muscarinic dependent plasticity in visual cortex and the impact of cholinergic degeneration. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,750

19. Almonte, Antoine Gabriel. The role of protease-activated reseptor-1 in synaptic plasticity and memory.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is an unusual G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated through proteolytic cleavage by extracellular serine proteases. While previous work has shown… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Association Learning  – physiology<; br>; Avoidance Learning  – physiology<; br>; Conditioning, Classical  – physiology<; br>; Hippocampus<; br>; Long-Term Potentiation<; br>; Receptor, PAR-1  – metabolism<; br>; Retention (Psychology)  – physiology<; br>; Serine Proteases

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APA (6th Edition):

Almonte, A. G. (2011). The role of protease-activated reseptor-1 in synaptic plasticity and memory. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,944

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Almonte, Antoine Gabriel. “The role of protease-activated reseptor-1 in synaptic plasticity and memory.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,944.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Almonte, Antoine Gabriel. “The role of protease-activated reseptor-1 in synaptic plasticity and memory.” 2011. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Almonte AG. The role of protease-activated reseptor-1 in synaptic plasticity and memory. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,944.

Council of Science Editors:

Almonte AG. The role of protease-activated reseptor-1 in synaptic plasticity and memory. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,944

20. Atkins, Kelly Dunham. The effect of sulfasalazine on functional recovery and neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition resulting in loss of motor function as well as sensory abnormalities. Insight into the pathophysiology of SCI… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Gliosis  – pathology<; br>; NF-kappa B  – metabolism<; br>; Pain  – metabolism<; br>; Spinal Cord Injuries  – complications<; br>; Spinal Cord Injuries  – pathology<; br>; Sulfasalazine

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APA (6th Edition):

Atkins, K. D. (2011). The effect of sulfasalazine on functional recovery and neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1034

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Atkins, Kelly Dunham. “The effect of sulfasalazine on functional recovery and neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1034.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Atkins, Kelly Dunham. “The effect of sulfasalazine on functional recovery and neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.” 2011. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Atkins KD. The effect of sulfasalazine on functional recovery and neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1034.

Council of Science Editors:

Atkins KD. The effect of sulfasalazine on functional recovery and neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1034

.