Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama – Birmingham" +contributor:("Schroeder, Harry W.<br>"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Alder, Matthew N. The adaptive immune system of sea lamprey.

Degree: PhD, 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Jawed vertebrates rearrange their immunoglobulin V, D, and J gene segments to generate a large repertoire of antibody receptors. Jawless vertebrates instead have evolved an adaptive immune system that does not use immunoglobulin genes. We show that lamprey and hagfish lymphocytes generate a large repertoire of variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) by randomly assembling leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) gene segments. The assembly proceeds by insertion of flanking LRR cassettes into an incomplete germline VLR gene via a multi-step, piecewise gene conversion process. Monoallelic VLR assembly leads to the expression of unique cell surface VLRs by individual lymphocytes as the basis for a clonally diverse lamprey lymphocyte repertoire that is comparable to the antigen receptor repertoire of mammalian B lymphocytes (>1014). We also characterize the cellular and humoral responses of lamprey to different immunogens. To identify the VLR-bearing cells and their soluble VLR products we used monoclonal antibodies specific for the invariant stalk region of VLRs. Immunization of lampreys with Bacillus anthracis exosporium induced lymphocyte transformation, differentiation, and secretion of multivalent VLR antibodies specific for the BclA spore surface protein. Lampreys immunized with blood group O erythrocytes produced VLR antibodies with specificity for the carbohydrate H antigen. The results of these experiments provide new insights into the evolution of adaptive immune systems.

vi, 78 p. : ill., digital, PDF file

Microbiology

Joint Health Sciences

Lamprey Evolution Immune

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Cooper, Max D., Briles, David E.<br>Burrows, Peter D.<br>Schroeder, Harry W.<br>Sorscher, Eric J..

Subjects/Keywords: Adaptation, Biological<; br>; Immunity  – genetics<; br>; Immunoglobulin Variable Region<; br>; Lampreys  – immunology<; br>; Lymphocytes  – immunology<; br>; Receptors, Immunologic  – genetics

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alder, M. N. (2008). The adaptive immune system of sea lamprey. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,428

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alder, Matthew N. “The adaptive immune system of sea lamprey.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,428.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alder, Matthew N. “The adaptive immune system of sea lamprey.” 2008. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Alder MN. The adaptive immune system of sea lamprey. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,428.

Council of Science Editors:

Alder MN. The adaptive immune system of sea lamprey. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,428

2. Foote, Jeremy B. Polysaccharide specific B cells: a study of their development and function.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Polysaccharides are important structural components of bacterial capsule and cell walls. Polysaccharide-specific antibodies are an important component of serologic memory capable of protecting against infection by pathogenic microorganisms. An understanding of the biology and function of polysaccharide specific B cells is necessary for formulation of vaccines designed to induce polysaccharide specific memory and longlived antibody production. The goal of this dissertation was to examine the development of naïve DEX-specific B cells and examine their capacity to generate memory and longlived plasma cells in response to polysaccharide [alpha] 1->3-dextran (DEX), which is expressed by the opportunistic pathogens Enterobacter cloacae, Histoplasma capsulatum and Aspergilillus fumigatus. In the first study we examined the development of DEX-specific B cells in naïve mice and the ability of DEX-expressing microorganisms to promote development of DEX-specific memory B cells. In naive mice DEX-specific B cells preferentially enriched in MZ and B1b B cell populations. Challenge with DEX or DEX-expressing microorganisms resulted in the activation of MZ B cells and rapid production of peak titers of DEX-specific antibodies followed by the formation of long-lived DEX-specific B1b B cells capable of sustaining DEX-specific antibody production for up to 150 days. DEX-specific B1b B cells provided enhanced production of DEX-specific antibodies after secondary challenge in a manner independent of germinal center and T cell help, but instead dependent upon their capacity to self-renew. In the second study we investigated the ability of DEX to induce the formation of long-lived plasma cells. We examined the biology of DEX-specific plasma cells induced in response to DEX demonstrating that DEX did not generate long-lived plasma cells, but instead the generation of short-lived plasmablast and plasma cells, which were dependent upon DEX persistence. This study demonstrated an essential role for polysaccharide persistence in the maintaining long-lived polysaccharide-specific antibody production. Collectively these findings demonstrated that polysaccharides are capable of generating long-lived memory B cells and that maintenance of DEX-specific antibody production was dependent upon persistence of DEX, which continually stimulated the generation of short-lived plasmablast and plasma cells.

ix, 127 p. : ill., digital, PDF file

Microbiology

Joint Health Sciences

Antibody Memory Persistance Dextran Polysaccharide B cells

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Kearney, John F., Burrows, Peter D.<br>, Lorenz, Robinna G.<br>, Elson, Charles O.<br>, Schroeder, Harry W.<br>, Weaver, Casey T..

Subjects/Keywords: Antibodies, Bacterial<; br>; Antibody Specificity<; br>; B-Lymphocyte Subsets  – immunology<; br>; Dextrans  – immunology<; br>; Mice<; br>; Polysaccharides, Bacterial  – pharmacology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Foote, J. B. (2009). Polysaccharide specific B cells: a study of their development and function. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,497

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Foote, Jeremy B. “Polysaccharide specific B cells: a study of their development and function.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,497.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Foote, Jeremy B. “Polysaccharide specific B cells: a study of their development and function.” 2009. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Foote JB. Polysaccharide specific B cells: a study of their development and function. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,497.

Council of Science Editors:

Foote JB. Polysaccharide specific B cells: a study of their development and function. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,497

.