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You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama – Birmingham" +contributor:("Kvale, Elizabeth <br>"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Pullins, Jessica Erin. Pain in palliative and supportive care outpatients : a longitudinal exploration.

Degree: PhD, 2010, University of Alabama – Birmingham

This longitudinal observational study examined the pain experience of palliative care outpatients during their first four appointments. To illustrate the longitudinal methods used, the author first provides a general overview of the multilevel model for change and then applies it to the outpatients' pain data. Younger age and an existing or new opioid prescription at the first appointment were linked to higher pain intensity and interference scores. Pain intensity and interference trajectories were widely varied across appointments, with the overall effect of a gradual reduction in pain over time. The clinical and research implications of these results are discussed.

1 online resource (vii, 39 p.) : ill., facsim.

Medical Psychology

College of Arts and Sciences

Palliative Outpatient Pain Longitudinal Multilevel model Hierarchical linear model Brief pain inventory

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Tucker, Diane C., Kvale, Elizabeth <br>, Mugavero, Michael <br>, Ritchie, Christine <br>, Roth, David.

Subjects/Keywords: Pain  – Patients  – Psychology  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Pain  – Palliative treatment  – Longitudinal studies <; br>; Ambulatory medical care  – Longitudinal studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pullins, J. E. (2010). Pain in palliative and supportive care outpatients : a longitudinal exploration. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,721

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pullins, Jessica Erin. “Pain in palliative and supportive care outpatients : a longitudinal exploration.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,721.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pullins, Jessica Erin. “Pain in palliative and supportive care outpatients : a longitudinal exploration.” 2010. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Pullins JE. Pain in palliative and supportive care outpatients : a longitudinal exploration. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,721.

Council of Science Editors:

Pullins JE. Pain in palliative and supportive care outpatients : a longitudinal exploration. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,721

2. Okonkwo, Renata Marie. Psychosocial and affective mediators of ethnic group differences in stressor-evoked changes in systolic blood pressure and pain perception.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

African Americans, compared to non-Hispanic whites, report greater levels of clinical pain and experience more pain-related disability (AmericanHeartAssociation, 2005; C. L. Edwards, Fillingim, & Keefe, 2001; R. R. Edwards, Doleys, Fillingim, & Lowery, 2001; McCracken, Matthews, Tang, & Cuba, 2001; J. L. Riley et al., 2002). Furthermore, African Americans consistently differ from primarily non-Hispanic white samples on experimentally induced pain. We examined ethnic group differences in the effects of exposure to a brief stressor on individuals’ pain responses and changes in SBP and heart rate (HR). In addition, we examined the mediational role of perceived racial discrimination, and differences in the relationship between PA and NA on ethnic differences in pain and psychophysiological responses (SBP and HR). The results from our study are consistent with those of previous studies that have documented enhanced affective-motivational pain responses among African Americans compared to white Americans. Our study, then, is the first to find evidence of both positive and negative influences on the relationship between ethnicity and pain responses. These findings are consistent with our understanding of the function of the neuromatrix or gate control mechanisms that underlie variations in pain responses (Melzack & Loeser, 1999). Our findings represent important data that will be used to design studies of ethnic group differences in pain responses within patient samples. Future investigations will include use of psychosocial stressors that are highly relevant to patient participants, measurements of stressor-evoked changes in neuroendocrine factors involved in both pain and blood pressure regulation, and measures of negative and positive affect in order to advance the current understanding of ethnic group differences in pain regulatory systems. Furthermore, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the impact of experiences of discrimination and the possible role of PA and NA dynamics mediating the latter's impact on health outcomes among African Americans is recommended.

1 online resource (ix, 76 p.) : facsim.

Psychology

College of Arts and Sciences

Ethnic group differences Blood pressure Affect Experiences of discrimination Pain perception Stressor

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Bradley, Laurence, Banos, James <br>, Griffith, Elizabeth <br>, Kvale, Elizabeth <br>, Richards, J. Scott.

Subjects/Keywords: African Americans  – Psychology <; br>; Whites  – United States  – Psychology <; br>; Blood pressure <; br>; Pain perception <; br>; Stress (Psychology)  – Social aspects <; br>; Stress (Psychology)  – Physiological aspects <; br>; Race discrimination  – Psychological aspects <; br>; Race discrimination  – Physiological aspects

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Okonkwo, R. M. (2009). Psychosocial and affective mediators of ethnic group differences in stressor-evoked changes in systolic blood pressure and pain perception. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1006

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Okonkwo, Renata Marie. “Psychosocial and affective mediators of ethnic group differences in stressor-evoked changes in systolic blood pressure and pain perception.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1006.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Okonkwo, Renata Marie. “Psychosocial and affective mediators of ethnic group differences in stressor-evoked changes in systolic blood pressure and pain perception.” 2009. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Okonkwo RM. Psychosocial and affective mediators of ethnic group differences in stressor-evoked changes in systolic blood pressure and pain perception. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1006.

Council of Science Editors:

Okonkwo RM. Psychosocial and affective mediators of ethnic group differences in stressor-evoked changes in systolic blood pressure and pain perception. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1006

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