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You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama – Birmingham" +contributor:("Baskin, Monica<br>"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Mullins, Monique S. Relating traumatic stress to hopelessness and risk behaviors among African American adolescents living within high poverty communities.

Degree: M.P.H., 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

While most are familiar with PTSD due to combat, few realize individuals growing up in communities with high poverty and high crime often experience tragedy to the degree which PTSD occurs. Although adolescents are often not the perpetrators of violent acts, adolescents still bear the strain of living in an environment where there is a constant threat of serious injury to themselves and/or to people they hold dear. By probing the relationship between traumatic stress and risk behavior such as drug abuse, fighting, weapon use, and risky sexual behaviors, policy makers and community leaders will have a better understanding of the beliefs and attitudes behind negative behaviors in traumatized adolescents and therefore be able to identify appropriate tools to combat deviant adolescent behavior. The purpose of this study is to relate traumatic stress to risk behaviors and hopelessness among African American children adolescences in high poverty communities in Mobile, AL. It uses data collected between 1998 and 2005 as part of the Mobile Youth Survey (MYS), a community-based, multiple cohort longitudinal study of mainly African American adolescents growing up in extremely impoverished neighborhoods in the Mobile Alabama. The linear mixed model analysis revealed that traumatic stress was a statistically significant predictor of the development variables hopelessness (p<0.001) and self worth (p<0.001), and the psychosocial variable worry (p<0.001). For violent risky behaviors, iii traumatic stress was a statistically significant predictor for carrying a gun or knife (p<0.01), weapon brandishment (p<0.01), and fighting (p<0.01), but did not predict weapon usage. No statistically significant differences were found for sexual activity, marijuana, tobacco, cocaine, or alcohol usage. Surprisingly, being the victim of violence did not predict traumatic stress, but instead was predicted by witnessing violence (p<0.05). The study findings underscore the importance of intervention programs arming participants with skills to understand their cognitive response to trauma, and how these responses can be internalized in the form of hopelessness, lack of self worth, and worry, and be externalized in the form of increased engagement in violent behavior.

M.P.H.

1 online resource (viii, 41 p. : ill., digital, PDF file)

Public Health;

traumatic stress risk behaviors high poverty communities African Americans adolescents

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Tucker, Jalie, Baskin, Monica<br>, Bolland, John<br>, Lian, Bradley.

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescent<; br>; Adolescent Behavior  – psychology<; br>; African Americans  – psychology<; br>; Depression  – psychology<; br>; Poverty  – psychology<; br>; Risk-Taking<; br>; Social Environment<; br>; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic  – ethnology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mullins, M. S. (2009). Relating traumatic stress to hopelessness and risk behaviors among African American adolescents living within high poverty communities. (Masters Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1024

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mullins, Monique S. “Relating traumatic stress to hopelessness and risk behaviors among African American adolescents living within high poverty communities.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1024.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mullins, Monique S. “Relating traumatic stress to hopelessness and risk behaviors among African American adolescents living within high poverty communities.” 2009. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Mullins MS. Relating traumatic stress to hopelessness and risk behaviors among African American adolescents living within high poverty communities. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1024.

Council of Science Editors:

Mullins MS. Relating traumatic stress to hopelessness and risk behaviors among African American adolescents living within high poverty communities. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1024

2. McMillan, Naya S. The role of neighborhood residency in the decision to evacuate.

Degree: D.P.H., 2008, University of Alabama – Birmingham

After Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast area, the US Congress directed the Department of Homeland Security to “report on the status of catastrophic planning, including mass evacuation planning, in all 50 States and the 75 largest urban areas.” The National Plan Review found that current evacuation guidelines, plans, and exercises are insufficient. Given these findings and previous knowledge that timely evacuation prevents and reduces injury, illness, and death associated with disasters, it is prudent to make efforts to improve the current state of evacuation through theoretically based research. The constructs of the socio-political ecology perspective and the warning response model are applied to the proposed evacuation compliance model, which includes the variables of neighborhood residency, preparedness plan, evacuation warning awareness, and threat belief. Neighborhoods are collectively characterized by their residents’ demographic attributes of gender, age, race, income, poverty, educational attainment, unemployment, residential stability, homeownership, disability, and vehicular accessibility. Secondary data analysis of a survey given to Hurricane Katrina survivors is used to evaluate the proposed evacuation compliance model. Based on the data analyzed, evacuation decision and evacuation warning awareness were shown to differ by neighborhood. Neighborhood residency, evacuation warning awareness, and threat belief variables were significant in the decision to evacuate. Demographic attributes assigned to the neighborhood expressed themselves differently than what is found when assigned to the individual, e.g., high home-ownership neighborhoods being more likely to result in the evacuation of its residents. The evacuation compliance model accounted for 13% of the unexplained variance suggesting unknown factors are involved in the evacuation decision-making process. The findings of the present study suggest that future evacuation compliance research should continue to explore the collective influence neighborhood residency has on evacuation decision for further use in emergency planning which will in turn improve the overall health of populations impacted by a catastrophic disaster.

D.P.H.

1 online resource (xi, 86 p. : ill., digital, PDF file)

Environmental Health Sciences

Public Health;

evacuation neighborhood disaster emergency preparedness public health

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Greenup, Pat, Bartolucci, Al<br>, Baskin, Monica<br>, Lagory, Mark<br>, Maples, Elizabeth.

Subjects/Keywords: Decision Making<; br>; Disaster Planning<; br>; Disasters<; br>; Residence Characteristics<; br>; Social Support

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McMillan, N. S. (2008). The role of neighborhood residency in the decision to evacuate. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,684

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McMillan, Naya S. “The role of neighborhood residency in the decision to evacuate.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,684.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McMillan, Naya S. “The role of neighborhood residency in the decision to evacuate.” 2008. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

McMillan NS. The role of neighborhood residency in the decision to evacuate. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,684.

Council of Science Editors:

McMillan NS. The role of neighborhood residency in the decision to evacuate. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2008. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,684

3. Williams, Michelle Sharonda. A Mixed Methods Study Of Health Literacy And Its Role In Hpv Vaccine Uptake Among College Students.

Degree: 2014, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Health literacy includes the ability to understand and process written and spoken health information, and numbers and calculations related to health information. Low health literacy is associated with negative health outcomes, and poor patient-provider communication. In order to advance health literacy research, there is a need to assess health literacy comprehensively and to develop an understanding of how health literacy impacts people at various stages of their lives. A sequential explanatory mixed methods study was conducted to assess college students' health literacy. During the quantitative phase, the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA), the Newest Vital Sign (NVS), the Cancer Message Literacy Test-Listening (CMLT-Listening), and the e-Health Literacy Scale (eHEALS) were used to assess the students' print literacy, health-related numeracy, aural cancer literacy, and eHealth literacy, respectively. During the qualitative phase, in-depth interviews were conducted with a subset of the original participants to obtain further evidence supporting the results of the literacy assessments and to identify factors in their social cultural environment that influence their health-related decisions including uptake of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. During the quantitative phase, 160 students completed four health literacy assessments. The mean scores on the health literacy assessment were: S-TOFHLA: 35.2; CMLT-Listening: 82%; eHEALS: 80.9%; and NVS: 5.1. The scores of 3 of the 4 health literacy assessments were not correlated with their uptake of the HPV vaccine. Twenty students participated in in-depth interviews during the qualitative phase. The students' scores on the quantitative health literacy assessments indicated that they had adequate health literacy. However, the qualitative data showed that the students' cancer literacy, eHealth literacy, and numeracy skills were not as adequate as their health literacy test scores indicated. Furthermore, the qualitative data revealed that the majority of the students who had received the HPV vaccine had done so as the result of a recommendation from a healthcare provider or their parents. Therefore, it did not appear that they made an autonomous decision to get the HPV vaccine. The results of this study indicate that assessing health literacy using a one-dimensional approach may not accurately reflect college students' level of health literacy. In addition, students tend to rely on their aural literacy and eHealth literacy skills when seeking health information and making healthcare decisions. Therefore, there is a need for the development and implementation of intervention aimed at improving these skills among college students.

PhD

1 online resource (x, 206 pages) :illustrations

D.P.H.University of Alabama at Birmingham2014.

Public Health

cancer literacy college students Health literacy HPV vaccine mixed methods

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Connie Kohler, Baskin,Monica Harrington,Kathy Ivankova,Nataliya Jukkala,Angela Martin,Suzanne.

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescent Health Knowledge; Attitudes; Practice Health Literacy. Papillomavirus Infections – prevention & control. Papillomavirus Vaccines. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms – prevention & control Young Adult.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Williams, M. S. (2014). A Mixed Methods Study Of Health Literacy And Its Role In Hpv Vaccine Uptake Among College Students. (Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Michelle Sharonda. “A Mixed Methods Study Of Health Literacy And Its Role In Hpv Vaccine Uptake Among College Students.” 2014. Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Michelle Sharonda. “A Mixed Methods Study Of Health Literacy And Its Role In Hpv Vaccine Uptake Among College Students.” 2014. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Williams MS. A Mixed Methods Study Of Health Literacy And Its Role In Hpv Vaccine Uptake Among College Students. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2014. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Williams MS. A Mixed Methods Study Of Health Literacy And Its Role In Hpv Vaccine Uptake Among College Students. [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2014. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.