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You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama – Birmingham" +contributor:("Austin, Erika L. <br>"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Mwaria, Mercy W. Multiple roles : benefits or strain? an examination of the effects of work and mothering on health lifestyle behaviors for women living with HIV/AIDS.

Degree: PhD, 2007, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Does occupying multiple roles cause strain or does it lead to health lifestyle practices for women living with HIV/AIDS? Previous research has established a relationship between multiple role occupation and physical and mental wellbeing for women. Health lifestyle modifications for persons living with HIV/AIDS benefit health by slowing down disease progression and enhancing the body’s tolerance to drug therapies. This study extends these findings to a specific population of women living with HIV/AIDS and examines health lifestyle outcomes for this population. Using data from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), the study draws on a subsample of women (N=847) from a larger nationally representative sample of persons living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Logistic regression results reveal that controlling for demographic, and other HIV-specific factors, women who have young children living with them in the household, as well as women that work longer paid hours are more likely to engage in health promoting behaviors. Specifically, occupying the roles of mother and working longer paid hours protected women against alcohol abuse and drug dependency. The findings support the role enhancement hypothesis that proposes the benefits of engaging in social roles for health and overall wellbeing. There was moderate support for role strain. Having children in the household and working longer paid hours reduced the odds of exercising. The results of this study are important for health, legal and social interventions that are targeted at women living with HIV/AIDS.

x, 104 p. : ill., digital, PDF file.

Sociology

Social and Behavioral Sciences

women HIV work children health lifestyle

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Drentea, Patricia, Austin, Erika L.<br>, Cockerham, William C.<br>, Davies, Susan L.<br>, McElderry, Cathy G..

Subjects/Keywords: Employment <; br>; Health Status <; br>; HIV Infections <; br>; Life Style <; br>; Mothers  – psychology <; br>; Quality of Life <; br>; Social Behavior

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mwaria, M. W. (2007). Multiple roles : benefits or strain? an examination of the effects of work and mothering on health lifestyle behaviors for women living with HIV/AIDS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,92

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mwaria, Mercy W. “Multiple roles : benefits or strain? an examination of the effects of work and mothering on health lifestyle behaviors for women living with HIV/AIDS.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,92.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mwaria, Mercy W. “Multiple roles : benefits or strain? an examination of the effects of work and mothering on health lifestyle behaviors for women living with HIV/AIDS.” 2007. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Mwaria MW. Multiple roles : benefits or strain? an examination of the effects of work and mothering on health lifestyle behaviors for women living with HIV/AIDS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2007. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,92.

Council of Science Editors:

Mwaria MW. Multiple roles : benefits or strain? an examination of the effects of work and mothering on health lifestyle behaviors for women living with HIV/AIDS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2007. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,92

2. Irwin, Jay A. Stress and support among Southern lesbians: an application of the stress process model.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Alabama – Birmingham

The research question to be addressed in this dissertation is: Among adult Southern lesbians, does stress, social support, family ties, and social capital affect feelings of well-being among adult lesbians? Well-being is operationalized as depressive symptoms in this investigation. A study of this magnitude has not been conducted on such a population in previous work, either in sexuality research, or in the stress literature. This dissertation uses the stress process model as the main theoretical perspective and contributes to the existing literature on minority populations regarding the importance of stress, resources, and mental health. Lesbians in the Southern region of the U.S. face many stressors in their everyday lives, some of which are unique to the population. Such lesbian-specific stressors are homophobia, discrimination, and familial issues. By using the stress process model, this research focuses on the importance of stressors, both general and population-specific, in understanding levels of depressive symptoms. Also, psychosocial resources are key to understanding possible mediation effects on the relationship between stressors and depression. Furthermore, the life course perspective, which looks at individuals as inextricably connected with others and bound to their social and temporal locations, informs the current investigation by highlighting unique characteristics of the population. In order to answer the research question put forward in this work, primary data are collected through the Lesbian Social Life (LSL) study. The LSL study consists of 1,141 self-identified lesbians living in 13 Southern U.S. states. Hypotheses are tested using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Overall, 5 of the 6 hypotheses are at least partially supported, showing that the stress process model is a good framework for understanding the experience of mental health issues in a lesbian population. General stress is the best predictor of depressive symptoms, and partial mediation of this relationship is present through the psychosocial resources of social support and mastery. Discrimination is also significant in predicting depression, with partial mediation present through social support. Residential partnership status is the strongest sociodemographic predictor of depressive symptoms, similar to marital status for heterosexual populations.

xii, 166 p. : ill., digital, PDF file

Medical Sociology

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Stress Social Support Lesbian Depression Mental Health

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Drentea, Patricia, Cotten, Shelia R.<br>Austin, Erika L.<br>Sawyer, Patricia L.<br>Vance, David E..

Subjects/Keywords: Homosexuality, Female  – psychology<; br>; Mental Health<; br>; Models, Psychological<; br>; Social Support<; br>; Stress, Psychological

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Irwin, J. A. (2009). Stress and support among Southern lesbians: an application of the stress process model. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,393

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Irwin, Jay A. “Stress and support among Southern lesbians: an application of the stress process model.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,393.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Irwin, Jay A. “Stress and support among Southern lesbians: an application of the stress process model.” 2009. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Irwin JA. Stress and support among Southern lesbians: an application of the stress process model. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,393.

Council of Science Editors:

Irwin JA. Stress and support among Southern lesbians: an application of the stress process model. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2009. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,393

3. Jones, Tara L. Gender, race, power, and condom-use : understanding relationship power and condom-use among young heterosexually-active adults .

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Alabama – Birmingham

HIV/AIDS continues to be a significant public health threat among heterosexually- active females in the United States, particularly among Black females. Rates of HIV infection among heterosexually-active, non-injection drug using females have been increasing since the 1990s. Previous research recommends the need to consider the gendered and cultural context within which these infections are occurring. This research responds to these recommendations by using Connell’s (1987) theory of gender and power as a theoretical guide to test the following research questions: 1. Does relationship power differ by sex and race? 2. Does relationship power mediate the effect of condom-use? 3. Does condom-use differ by sex and race? 4. Is there an interaction effect of sex and race on condom-use? Using data from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Wave III), an analytic sample (n = 682) was created to examine sex and racial differences in relationship power and condom-use among heterosexually-active adults 18 – 27 years of age. Controlling for demographic factors, logistic regression results partially supported the hypothesis relationship power differs by sex and race. That is, results suggests that females are less likely to be sexually assertive and more likely to have a history of relationship violence, in their current relationship, than males; and Blacks are less likely to be satisfied with their current relationship than other races. Results also suggested that none of the measures of relationship power (sexual assertiveness, history of violence in relationship, relationship satisfaction, and decision-making dominance) have a signifi-cant relationship with condom-use, by sex or gender. Although, the results are not entire-ly as predicted, this research still contributes to the understanding of relationship power, and the health and well-being of heterosexual females. Future research should continue to focus on structural-related factors and condom-use, but not to the exclusion of agency.

1 online resource (x, 94 p.) : ill., forms.

Sociology

College of Arts and Sciences

Condom-use Relationship power Heterosexually-active

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Drentea, Patricia, Cotten, Shelia <br>, Austin, Erika L. <br>, Davies, Susan L. <br>, McElderry. Cathy G..

Subjects/Keywords: Condom use  – Social aspects  – United States <; br>; Condom use  – United States  – Statistics <; br>; Young adults  – Sexual behavior  – United States <; br>; Heterosexual women  – United States  – Psychology <; br>; Couples  – United States  – Psychology <; br>; Man-woman relationships  – United States  – Psychological aspects <; br>; Relationship quality <; br>; Power (Social sciences) <; br>; Sex role  – United States <; br>; Ethnopsychology  – United States <; br>; Communication and sex  – United States

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, T. L. (2011). Gender, race, power, and condom-use : understanding relationship power and condom-use among young heterosexually-active adults . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1029

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Tara L. “Gender, race, power, and condom-use : understanding relationship power and condom-use among young heterosexually-active adults .” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1029.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Tara L. “Gender, race, power, and condom-use : understanding relationship power and condom-use among young heterosexually-active adults .” 2011. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Jones TL. Gender, race, power, and condom-use : understanding relationship power and condom-use among young heterosexually-active adults . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1029.

Council of Science Editors:

Jones TL. Gender, race, power, and condom-use : understanding relationship power and condom-use among young heterosexually-active adults . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2011. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1029

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