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You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama" +contributor:("University of Alabama. Dept. of Gender and Race Studies"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Alabama

1. Kruse, Kenneth James. Dream more while you are awake: a correctional fantasy.

Degree: 2015, University of Alabama

Before September 2013, I had been in four prisons, none of them currently used to incarcerate people. I had visited them all as a tourist – in Argentina, Cambodia, Chile, and Vietnam – for the purpose of understanding the histories of these countries. My participation in this tragedy tourism certainly informs the reader of the incredible amount of privilege (both personal and communal – to travel internationally as a tourist, to have had the luxury of not having been to prison or jail myself or to have had a incarcerated family member/friend, of having broken the law many times but never getting caught/arrested/charged due to my social and economic positions, to travel to sites of incredible violence out of curiosity, etc.) with which I first came to teach in the prison. For the past three semesters, I have been teaching composition, creative writing, and literature at Alabama prisons. I taught for one semester at Tutwiler Prison for Women in Wetumpka and for two semesters at. St. Clair Correctional Facility in Springville (I am currently teaching there); both of these are maximum-security state facilities run by the Alabama Department of Corrections. Both Tutwiler and St. Clair have been in the news repeatedly over the past few years for egregious abuses of people incarcerated there. This thesis will, in an associative way, weave together disparate experiences and sources. I will include my personal experiences imagining and then teaching in the prison. Because it is unethical for me to share specific responses, verbal or written, from the students I work(ed) with in the prison, the prisoner voice in the thesis will be limited to narratives of prisoners around the United States excerpted from various published memoirs and collections. I will discuss the Free Alabama Movement manifesto produced by Mevlin Ray, who is incarcerated at St. Clair, which sparked labor strikes at three Alabama prisons in protest of cheap and free prisoner labor in January 2014. I will also contextualize the contemporary prison in the United States by discussing the punitive nature of the prison and its place in a U. S. racist institutional history that evolved from slavery and Jim Crow. I will be in dialogue with such prison theorists as Michelle Alexander, Angela Davis, Michel Foucault, and Lisa Guenther. I will also reference the many depictions of prison in popular culture, including everything from television shows like Orange is the New Black and Oz, to leaders such as Bryan Stevenson and Collin Powell, to the Monopoly board game. With Dan Savage's idea that "we eroticize that which we fear," I will also bring the incredible amount of prison pornography into the conversation. The goal of this thesis is not to be a comprehensive analysis of the infinite flaws in the justice system of this country or of the ways in which we collectively support, deny, and necessitate this system. I will touch on, but not exhaust, state surveillance, for-profit prisons, detention of undocumented people, and juvenile detention. The goal is, rather, to attempt… Advisors/Committee Members: McKnight, Utz, Robinson, Michelle, Austin, Greg, University of Alabama. Dept. of Gender and Race Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation;  – thesis; Women's studies; Black studies; GLBT studies; Arts; Criminal Justice; Education; Gender; Prison; Race

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kruse, K. J. (2015). Dream more while you are awake: a correctional fantasy. (Thesis). University of Alabama. Retrieved from http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125622

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kruse, Kenneth James. “Dream more while you are awake: a correctional fantasy.” 2015. Thesis, University of Alabama. Accessed June 17, 2019. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125622.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kruse, Kenneth James. “Dream more while you are awake: a correctional fantasy.” 2015. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Kruse KJ. Dream more while you are awake: a correctional fantasy. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125622.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kruse KJ. Dream more while you are awake: a correctional fantasy. [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125622

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Alabama

2. Hill, Kiara Monique. "What don't Black girls do?": constructions of deviance and the performance of Black female sexuality.

Degree: 2015, University of Alabama

This research interrogates the ways in which Black women process and negotiate their sexual identities. By connecting the historical exploitation of Black female bodies to the way Black female deviant identities are manufactured and consumed currently, I was able to show not only the evolution of Black women's attitudes towards sexuality, but also the ways in which these attitudes manifest when policing deviancy amongst each other. Chapter 1 gives historical insight to the way that deviancy has been inextricably linked to the construction of Blackness. Using the Post-Reconstruction Era as my point of entry, I demonstrate the ways in which Black bodies were stigmatized as sexually deviant, and how the use of Black caricatures buttressed the consumption of this narrative by whites. I explain how countering this narrative became fundamental to the evolution of Black female sexual politics, and how ultimately bodily agency was later restored through sexual deviancy. Chapter 2 interrogates the way "authenticity" is propagated within the genre of reality TV. Black women are expected to perform deviant identities that coincide with controlling images so that the "authenticity" of Black womanhood is consumed by mainstream audiences. Using Vh1's Love and Hip Hop Atlanta and Basketball Wives I analyze the way these identities are performed and policed by the women on both shows. Lastly, Chapter 3 is a reflexive analysis detailing the ways in which Black women process the performances of deviant Black female identities on reality TV using ethnographic methods. (Published By University of Alabama Libraries) Advisors/Committee Members: Shoaff, Jennifer L., Raimist, Rachel, McKnight, Utz, University of Alabama. Dept. of Gender and Race Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation;  – thesis; Women's studies; African American studies; Black Female; Reality TV; Representation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hill, K. M. (2015). "What don't Black girls do?": constructions of deviance and the performance of Black female sexuality. (Thesis). University of Alabama. Retrieved from http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125673

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hill, Kiara Monique. “"What don't Black girls do?": constructions of deviance and the performance of Black female sexuality.” 2015. Thesis, University of Alabama. Accessed June 17, 2019. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125673.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hill, Kiara Monique. “"What don't Black girls do?": constructions of deviance and the performance of Black female sexuality.” 2015. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Hill KM. "What don't Black girls do?": constructions of deviance and the performance of Black female sexuality. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125673.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hill KM. "What don't Black girls do?": constructions of deviance and the performance of Black female sexuality. [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/125673

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Alabama

3. Caddell, April. From margin to center: feminism in an era of mainstream co-optation.

Degree: 2015, University of Alabama

Contemporary American culture is witnessing the phenomenon of many high-profile celebrities proudly calling themselves, feminist – I refer to these individuals as celebrity feminists. This phenomenon comes as a shift from the historical avoidance with the term feminist and the feminist movement due to mainstream media's portrayal of feminism using negative and fallacious stereotypes. The current shift to "feminism is wonderful," in the mainstream media – as a reflection of a white supremacist and patriarchal society – de-politicizes feminism, making it less of a radical movement that seeks social change and more a portrayal of individual empowerment on the part of exceptional women. In essence, it seeks to separate the personal from the political. Following the lead of bell hooks, we must combat this co-optation and de-politicization of feminism and reclaim it as a transformative politics. We must come to a consensus on what feminism is, even if the definition is fluid and broad, determine the goals of feminism so that we do not mistake the individual success of women as proof of feminism accomplished, and challenge the so-called sex positivity of feminism as portrayed by the mainstream media for its lack of inclusion of all people and its portrayal of sex as the last frontier of feminism. In spite of these misrepresentations, feminism has a bright future in an era of social media that gives the power of media and message to more people who can portray a feminism that is radical and uses an intersectional lens. (Published By University of Alabama Libraries) Advisors/Committee Members: Purvis, Jennifer, Shoaff, Jennifer, Jones, Jennifer, Green, Sharony, University of Alabama. Dept. of Gender and Race Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation;  – thesis; Women's studies; feminism; intersectionality; radical feminism; transnational feminism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Caddell, A. (2015). From margin to center: feminism in an era of mainstream co-optation. (Thesis). University of Alabama. Retrieved from http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131930

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caddell, April. “From margin to center: feminism in an era of mainstream co-optation.” 2015. Thesis, University of Alabama. Accessed June 17, 2019. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131930.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caddell, April. “From margin to center: feminism in an era of mainstream co-optation.” 2015. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Caddell A. From margin to center: feminism in an era of mainstream co-optation. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131930.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Caddell A. From margin to center: feminism in an era of mainstream co-optation. [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131930

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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