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You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama" +contributor:("Howeth, Jennifer G."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Alabama

1. Limbaugh, Joelle M. The use of habitat classification and mapping of the threatened flattened musk turtle in the shoreline management of Smith Lake, Alabama.

Degree: 2012, University of Alabama

The purpose of this thesis was to develop a habitat classification system indicating suitability of shoreline for the federally threatened flattened musk turtle (Sternotherus depressus). The shoreline of Smith Lake was visually assessed by a biologist familiar with S. depressus. Segments of shoreline were designated "Good", "Moderate" or "Poor" relative to substrate type. Sternotherus depressus prefers large rock with an abundance of crevices which it uses for protection. To ground truth the habitat classifications, 155 sites along the shoreline were trapped for S. depressus for three trapping seasons (spring and fall 2011, spring 2012). A total of 58 S. depressus individuals were trapped at 25 separate sites. Of these 25 sites, 14 were in "Good" habitat, nine were in "Moderate" habitat, and two were located in "Poor" habitat. A chi-square test for independence indicated that there is an association between the presence or absence of S. depressus and habitat type (÷2 = 8.463, N = 155, p = 0.015) at the trap site. The habitat classification system will be used by Alabama Power Company in its shoreline development program to help reduce adverse effects upon S. depressus or its habitat on Smith Lake. (Published By University of Alabama Libraries) Advisors/Committee Members: Steinberg, Michael K., Bryan, C Hobson, Howeth, Jennifer G., University of Alabama. Dept. of Geography.

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation;  – thesis; Geography; Wildlife conservation; Environmental management; flattened musk turtle; habitat; management; mapping; shoreline; threatened

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Limbaugh, J. M. (2012). The use of habitat classification and mapping of the threatened flattened musk turtle in the shoreline management of Smith Lake, Alabama. (Thesis). University of Alabama. Retrieved from http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81688

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Limbaugh, Joelle M. “The use of habitat classification and mapping of the threatened flattened musk turtle in the shoreline management of Smith Lake, Alabama.” 2012. Thesis, University of Alabama. Accessed January 15, 2021. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81688.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Limbaugh, Joelle M. “The use of habitat classification and mapping of the threatened flattened musk turtle in the shoreline management of Smith Lake, Alabama.” 2012. Web. 15 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Limbaugh JM. The use of habitat classification and mapping of the threatened flattened musk turtle in the shoreline management of Smith Lake, Alabama. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 15]. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81688.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Limbaugh JM. The use of habitat classification and mapping of the threatened flattened musk turtle in the shoreline management of Smith Lake, Alabama. [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2012. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81688

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Alabama

2. Martin, Sara. Determining drivers of plant community composition in a restored marsh: a complementary field and greenhouse study.

Degree: 2015, University of Alabama

As climate change continues, tidal marshes are increasingly vulnerable to degradation or loss from sea-level rise (SLR). Restoration projects can recover ecosystem services provided by tidal marshes, but initial planting effort and continued SLR may influence the success of such projects. To test these effects on ecosystem structure, three fringing marshes were restored in Weeks Bay, Alabama by transplanting intact sods of Juncus roemerianus from a nearby donor marsh into restored marshes at varying percent efforts (0, 25, 50, 75, 100%). SLR effects were tested by installing weirs in half of the plots (+SLR) and leaving the other half as controls (-SLR). Subsequent changes in plant community structure were monitored over two growing seasons. In a companion study, intact sods of J. roemerianus were transplanted to the greenhouse facility at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, AL. These sods were exposed to three inundation (-5, 0, +5 cm) and salinity (0, 4, 8 psu) levels in a full factorial experiment to gain further insight into the plant community changes observed in the field. Plant species richness increased in the field and greenhouse studies (from 1 to 25 and 8 total, respectively). In the greenhouse experiment, the increase in species richness was not affected by inundation or salinity. In the field experiment, the increase in species richness was dependent on initial cover, but was independent of inundation. This suggests that species richness and shifts in community composition were not driven by flooding and salinity associated with SLR, but by the larger propagule bank and colonization space for species other than J. roemerianus. However, the relative abundances of the species present in the field study did differ with SLR and initial planting cover. J. roemerianus and Sagittaria lancifolia increased with increasing initial effort treatments, but the relative abundance of J. roemerianus was greater within control plots while S. lancifolia was greater within weirs. Furthermore, after two growing seasons, plant cover was similar among the 50, 75, and 100% initial effort treatments, suggesting that moderate levels of initial effort can regain marsh structure and function within a few years. (Published By University of Alabama Libraries) Advisors/Committee Members: Cherry, Julia A., Howeth, Jennifer G., Cebrian, Just, University of Alabama. Dept. of Biological Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation;  – thesis; Ecology; Plant sciences; Environmental science; Flooding; Juncus roemerianus; Plant community; Restored marsh; Salinity; Sea-level rise

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martin, S. (2015). Determining drivers of plant community composition in a restored marsh: a complementary field and greenhouse study. (Thesis). University of Alabama. Retrieved from http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131918

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martin, Sara. “Determining drivers of plant community composition in a restored marsh: a complementary field and greenhouse study.” 2015. Thesis, University of Alabama. Accessed January 15, 2021. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131918.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martin, Sara. “Determining drivers of plant community composition in a restored marsh: a complementary field and greenhouse study.” 2015. Web. 15 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Martin S. Determining drivers of plant community composition in a restored marsh: a complementary field and greenhouse study. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 15]. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131918.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Martin S. Determining drivers of plant community composition in a restored marsh: a complementary field and greenhouse study. [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2015. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/131918

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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