Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Alabama" +contributor:("Dewar, Andrew"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Alabama

1. Ezell, Jonathan Elliot. Affective, attitudinal, and cognitive responses to music in modern U.S. political advertising.

Degree: 2012, University of Alabama

This dissertation investigated attitudinal, affective, and cognitive responses to musical and message content in modern U.S. political advertising by manipulating musical tempo, message valence, and music-message congruity as a function of musical modality in a within-subjects laboratory experiment. Conceptually, the present research adds to the understanding of the effects of music-message congruity by comparing it to music-message ambiguity; modally congruent messages featured either major- or minor-key musical content (when positive or negative, respectively), while musical content in modally ambiguous messages did not contain sufficient information to be classified as either major- or minor-key. Methodologically, a novel design was devised with the intent to control for verbal-visual content and isolate responses to musical content in the context of advertising messages. This design produced unexpected confounds for several of the dependent variables, particularly tests of memory and self-reported affective response. Initial findings were insignificant, with the exception of attitudinal measures relating to hedonic evaluation, which found significant main effects for music-message congruity and message valence, as well as an interaction between message valence and tempo, in the expected directions. Subsequent analysis of facial electromyography data along the zygomaticus major and corrugator supercilii muscle groups found that participants differed significantly in their responses to the independent variables based upon their level of political sophistication. Politically sophisticated participants exhibited psychophysiological affective contrast and the politically unsophisticated exhibited affective assimilation for the independent variables of music-message congruity, message valence, and musical tempo. The affective responses of political sophisticates that were inferred psychophysiologically were inconsistent with self-reported hedonic evaluation of the sample as a whole. These findings suggest that further research concerning the use of music as an affective cue is warranted, and that more thorough investigation of the role of political sophistication in affective and cognitive judgments be undertaken. Discrepancies between evaluative and psychophysiological results confirm the utility of response triangulation in experimental settings. For practical purposes, these results suggest the importance of utilizing affective content including music in different ways depending on the needs of the message and the level of topical sophistication estimated in the target audience. (Published By University of Alabama Libraries) Advisors/Committee Members: Zhou, Shuhua, Dewar, Andrew R., Pasadeos, Yorgo, Phelps, Joe, Potter, Robert F., University of Alabama. College of Communication and Information Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation;  – thesis; Mass communication; Psychology; Music; Advertising; Media; Music; Political; Psychology; Psychophysiology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ezell, J. E. (2012). Affective, attitudinal, and cognitive responses to music in modern U.S. political advertising. (Thesis). University of Alabama. Retrieved from http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81420

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ezell, Jonathan Elliot. “Affective, attitudinal, and cognitive responses to music in modern U.S. political advertising.” 2012. Thesis, University of Alabama. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81420.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ezell, Jonathan Elliot. “Affective, attitudinal, and cognitive responses to music in modern U.S. political advertising.” 2012. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Ezell JE. Affective, attitudinal, and cognitive responses to music in modern U.S. political advertising. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81420.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ezell JE. Affective, attitudinal, and cognitive responses to music in modern U.S. political advertising. [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2012. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81420

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Alabama

2. Woosley, Kevin Daniel. The lost art of improvisation: teaching improvisation to classical pianists.

Degree: 2012, University of Alabama

Musical improvisation is an art that was practiced by the majority of keyboard masters and pedagogues of the past. Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Liszt, and many others improvised during public performance and encouraged improvisation among their students. In today's music world, however, classical pianists are rarely comfortable improvising; as a result, they avoid teaching improvisatory skills at all levels, including in higher education facilities. Logically, if the teacher is not comfortable with improvisation, no attempt should be made to teach the art. Improvisation, however, is still a useful skill in the twenty-first century and should become a regular part of a classical pianist's training. This study primarily provides methods through which classical pianists can learn the fundamentals of improvisation and acquire the ability to teach improvisation to their students. These methods are useful to both student and teacher. Classical pianists must learn the foundations of improvisation in order to prevent the loss of an art that was once valuable to the historical masters of the keyboard and can be equally so to pianists today. (Published By University of Alabama Libraries) Advisors/Committee Members: Penick, Amanda, Gille, Tanya, Cummins, Linda, Peles, Stephen, Dewar, Andrew, Andrus, Fred, University of Alabama. School of Music.

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation;  – thesis; Music; Music education; Classical Piano; Extemporization; Improvisation; Piano; Piano Pedagogy

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woosley, K. D. (2012). The lost art of improvisation: teaching improvisation to classical pianists. (Thesis). University of Alabama. Retrieved from http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81407

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woosley, Kevin Daniel. “The lost art of improvisation: teaching improvisation to classical pianists.” 2012. Thesis, University of Alabama. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81407.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woosley, Kevin Daniel. “The lost art of improvisation: teaching improvisation to classical pianists.” 2012. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Woosley KD. The lost art of improvisation: teaching improvisation to classical pianists. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81407.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Woosley KD. The lost art of improvisation: teaching improvisation to classical pianists. [Thesis]. University of Alabama; 2012. Available from: http://purl.lib.ua.edu/81407

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.