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You searched for +publisher:"University of Adelaide" +contributor:("Speck, Catherine Margaret"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Woodburn, Susan. Alexander Schramm (1813-64) and the visual representation of Aboriginal people in mid-nineteenth century colonial Australia.

Degree: 2017, University of Adelaide

This thesis investigates a body of representations of Aboriginal people by the little known German-born artist Alexander Schramm (1813-64), made in the fifteen years after he emigrated to South Australia from Berlin in 1849. In these works, which consist of paintings, drawings and lithographs, Schramm depicted large and small groups of Aboriginal people travelling through the land, in camps, and in their interactions with colonists in and around the recently established settlement of Adelaide. At a time when artistic recognition of indigenous Australians was largely as a documentary record of ‘traditional’ life seen as inevitably in decline, as picturesque insertions into the landscape, or as an increasingly marginal element of daily life in colonial settlements, Schramm made them the focus of his works in their own right, seemingly without ethnographic or memorial intent, and with little suggestion of cultural and racial degeneration. It was this unusual engagement, and Schramm’s seeming independence of prevailing preconceptions about Aboriginal people, that provided the initial impetus for this study of his works. A further survey of comparable works by Schramm’s immediate predecessors and contemporaries was undertaken in order to identify the elements that make Schramm’s engagement and representations distinctive. As most attention to Schramm has been within the framework of a new consciousness of the impact of colonial settlement on Aboriginal Australians and of broader post-colonial discourse that takes a particular stance on visual representation of Indigenous people by colonial artists generally, this study also traces in some detail the changes in the appreciation and interpretation of his works between the time they were made and their gradual re-discovery more than a century later. The absence of Schramm’s own account of his reasons for making these works limits our understanding of the images he made and why he persisted in making them despite decreasing market appeal. There is no definitive evidence to support assertions of his personal or cultural sympathies with Aboriginal people, or whether he intended a critique of their situation under colonisation. Nonetheless, his works demonstrate that there were modes of artistic representation of Aboriginal people other than negative stereotyping or visual obliteration, and at the same time reflect not only the erosion of their numbers and traditional life with the expansion of colonial settlement but also resilience and adaptation in the face of dispossession. Advisors/Committee Members: Speck, Catherine Margaret (advisor), North, Ian (advisor), School of Humanities (school).

Subjects/Keywords: colonial art; Aboriginal Australians in art

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woodburn, S. (2017). Alexander Schramm (1813-64) and the visual representation of Aboriginal people in mid-nineteenth century colonial Australia. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/113390

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woodburn, Susan. “Alexander Schramm (1813-64) and the visual representation of Aboriginal people in mid-nineteenth century colonial Australia.” 2017. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/113390.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woodburn, Susan. “Alexander Schramm (1813-64) and the visual representation of Aboriginal people in mid-nineteenth century colonial Australia.” 2017. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Woodburn S. Alexander Schramm (1813-64) and the visual representation of Aboriginal people in mid-nineteenth century colonial Australia. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/113390.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Woodburn S. Alexander Schramm (1813-64) and the visual representation of Aboriginal people in mid-nineteenth century colonial Australia. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/113390

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

2. Harris, Jennifer Anne. The formation of the Japanese Art Collection at the Art Gallery of South Australia 1904-1940 : tangible evidence of Bunmei Kaika.

Degree: 2012, University of Adelaide

The momentous signing of the Treaty of Kanagawa in 1854 marked the turning point to end Japan’s long seclusion from the West. Its subsequent ‘opening’ unveiled the refreshingly different aesthetic canon of Japanese art which was enthusiastically hailed by nineteenth century Western artists and designers. As a much sought after commodity, Japanese art was collected in unprecedented quantities throughout Europe, the British Empire and the United States. The mania for things Japanese also reached the far-flung colonies in Australia and New Zealand. This phenomenon, referred to in the English-speaking world as ‘Mikado Mania’ or the ‘Cult of Japan’, coincided with the establishment of public museums, the proliferation of international exhibitions and ease of global travel. These innovations fostered and facilitated the formation of Japanese art collections internationally. A survey of Australian and New Zealand collections and a particular examination of the Art Gallery of South Australia’s collection formed between the years 1904-1940 reveal the circumstances and personalities that shaped the nature and content of the collections. It is argued in this thesis that while nascent colonial public museums and private collectors such as those in South Australia were guided by British tastes, the genesis of which predated the nineteenth century ‘opening’ of Japan, the collecting of Japanese art in nineteenth-century Australia and New Zealand served as a signifier of international discourse and modernity. For Japan, its art became a tool to fend off foreign hegemony. Driven by the slogan bunmei kaika ‘civilisation and enlightenment’, Japan throughout the Meiji era (1868-1912) exploited the mania for its art in order to achieve status and recognition as a world power. It will be further argued that the spirit of bunmei kaika also encapsulated the cultural aspirations of the fledgling colonies in Australia and New Zealand which, by the late nineteenth century, were endeavouring to articulate their own ‘civilisation and enlightenment’ within the British Empire. Through their efforts to advance onto the world stage, the Australian colonies played a significant, though unrecognised role in Japan’s experimentation and investment in its self-promotion as a civilised country. The cause and effect of measures undertaken by the Japanese government to achieve bunmei kaika through the applied arts of ceramics, metalware, ivories and lacquer can be directly demonstrated through the very objects collected in South Australia and the other colonies. A study of their intrinsic qualities and provenance provides tangible evidence of Japan’s strategic efforts to advance its national identity through art. It also serves to shed light on the curatorial expertise and connoisseurship being exercised at the time by colonial museums and collectors. Japanese objects acquired during the formative period of Australian and New Zealand museums have long been ignored or dismissed as hybridised and inauthentic. Recently their technological ingenuity and… Advisors/Committee Members: Speck, Catherine Margaret (advisor), School of History and Politics (school).

Subjects/Keywords: Japanese art; collections; Australia and New Zealand; Meiji era; exhibitions; bunmei kaika; civilisation and enlightenment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harris, J. A. (2012). The formation of the Japanese Art Collection at the Art Gallery of South Australia 1904-1940 : tangible evidence of Bunmei Kaika. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/84054

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harris, Jennifer Anne. “The formation of the Japanese Art Collection at the Art Gallery of South Australia 1904-1940 : tangible evidence of Bunmei Kaika.” 2012. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/84054.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harris, Jennifer Anne. “The formation of the Japanese Art Collection at the Art Gallery of South Australia 1904-1940 : tangible evidence of Bunmei Kaika.” 2012. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Harris JA. The formation of the Japanese Art Collection at the Art Gallery of South Australia 1904-1940 : tangible evidence of Bunmei Kaika. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/84054.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harris JA. The formation of the Japanese Art Collection at the Art Gallery of South Australia 1904-1940 : tangible evidence of Bunmei Kaika. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/84054

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

3. Osborne, Margot. Post-imperial perspectives: British art since 1940 at the Art Gallery of South Australia.

Degree: 2016, University of Adelaide

This dissertation examines the Art Gallery of South Australia’s patterns of collecting modern and contemporary British art since the outbreak of the Second World War. It analyses the relative influence on these collecting patterns of Australia’s transition from a mono-cultural British dominion to a post-imperial multicultural nation positioned in the Asia/Pacific region, in comparison to the influence of institutional and art world changes. It evaluates the resulting strengths and weaknesses of the collection and assesses post-imperial museological issues pertaining to collection management. Advisors/Committee Members: Speck, Catherine Margaret (advisor), North, Ian (advisor), School of Humanities (school).

Subjects/Keywords: Post-imperial Australia; British art; Twentieth century; Art Gallery of South Australia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Osborne, M. (2016). Post-imperial perspectives: British art since 1940 at the Art Gallery of South Australia. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103311

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Osborne, Margot. “Post-imperial perspectives: British art since 1940 at the Art Gallery of South Australia.” 2016. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103311.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Osborne, Margot. “Post-imperial perspectives: British art since 1940 at the Art Gallery of South Australia.” 2016. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Osborne M. Post-imperial perspectives: British art since 1940 at the Art Gallery of South Australia. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103311.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Osborne M. Post-imperial perspectives: British art since 1940 at the Art Gallery of South Australia. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103311

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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